Not meeting requirements for Finance/Economics MSc at LSE?

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x-Natalie-x
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I'm currently going into my 2nd year on a Business Management degree with a placement and I'm thinking about my future options after I graduate.

Surprisingly, i've enjoyed the finance aspects of my first year, and have thought about undertaking a finance & economics masters after. I'd like to study at a more prestigious university however. Ideally, I have LSE in mind, but I'm beginning to think I have absolutely no chance of ever getting onto one of their post-grad courses.

This is primarily because my current course (Business Management), doesn't have a significant amount of both finance modules, and economics. Despite it covering a wide spectrum of topics, it's very varied, which is seemly making it difficult for me to acquire the requirements needed for the post-grad courses.

I don't mean to jump the gun, and I am very aware that I'm planning for something that's 3 years away in which time my situation and decisions might change, but I don't want to leave it too late, and be disappointed and angry with myself for doing nothing sooner.

I should mention that I'm very hard working, and came out with 90+% in all modules for my first year, with 2 deans list awards. (Not sure whether this is of any relevance when it comes to choosing post-grad students).

I just would like to know whether I should consider changing my course (last case scenario), or whether I could still be accepted if there's some way of 'evidencing' that i'm capable of coping with both the workload and the quantitive side of the course?

If this is the case, i'm willing to do whatever is required to teach myself the basics.

Thanks!
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Mr.Econometrics
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Hey, I study Economics and just finished my first year. Having done Economics at A-Level, let me tell you that the jump from A-Level to first year alone is quite big. You mentioned your course briefly touching on Economics, however you do realise the subject is a lot more rigorous and at times tough to understand.

You mention being able to cope with the quantitative side of the course, could you explain a bit more about that? Do you mean a Mathematics module of some sort? Or some Finance based calculations? The Mathematics (in particular Statistics) which will be required at LSE will be very difficult. Unfortunately, Mathematical capacity at MSc level is not easily picked up easily via self-teaching. Unless you did very well at Mathematics A-Level.

I would recommend you to consider transferring onto an Economics BSc course if you really want to study it at Post-Grad level.
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x-Natalie-x
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(Original post by Mr.Econometrics)
Hey, I study Economics and just finished my first year. Having done Economics at A-Level, let me tell you that the jump from A-Level to first year alone is quite big. You mentioned your course briefly touching on Economics, however you do realise the subject is a lot more rigorous and at times tough to understand.

You mention being able to cope with the quantitative side of the course, could you explain a bit more about that? Do you mean a Mathematics module of some sort? Or some Finance based calculations? The Mathematics (in particular Statistics) which will be required at LSE will be very difficult. Unfortunately, Mathematical capacity at MSc level is not easily picked up easily via self-teaching. Unless you did very well at Mathematics A-Level.

I would recommend you to consider transferring onto an Economics BSc course if you really want to study it at Post-Grad level.
Thanks for your reply. By quantitative, I meant finance based (Finance and Accounting module), and I know for certain we only 'touched' on it.

I don't mean to sound too big for my boots, or undermine the people studying Economics at MSc by suggesting it's 'easy' in any way. I think deep down I know that my current course just won't cut it in terms of providing me with the knowledge required to apply for the MSc course. I just feel like I'm not challenging myself enough currently, and this concerns me.

I believe you're right in that possibly moving to an Economics BSc would be the best, and the only route or alternatively re-evauating my options and making a different career choice.

Yeeesh. I need to be more decisive. :unimpressed:

Thanks again, and good luck with the rest of your degree :rolleyes:
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NuriaM
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(Original post by x-Natalie-x)
I'm currently going into my 2nd year on a Business Management degree with a placement and I'm thinking about my future options after I graduate.

Surprisingly, i've enjoyed the finance aspects of my first year, and have thought about undertaking a finance & economics masters after. I'd like to study at a more prestigious university however. Ideally, I have LSE in mind, but I'm beginning to think I have absolutely no chance of ever getting onto one of their post-grad courses.

This is primarily because my current course (Business Management), doesn't have a significant amount of both finance modules, and economics. Despite it covering a wide spectrum of topics, it's very varied, which is seemly making it difficult for me to acquire the requirements needed for the post-grad courses.

I don't mean to jump the gun, and I am very aware that I'm planning for something that's 3 years away in which time my situation and decisions might change, but I don't want to leave it too late, and be disappointed and angry with myself for doing nothing sooner.

I should mention that I'm very hard working, and came out with 90+% in all modules for my first year, with 2 deans list awards. (Not sure whether this is of any relevance when it comes to choosing post-grad students).

I just would like to know whether I should consider changing my course (last case scenario), or whether I could still be accepted if there's some way of 'evidencing' that i'm capable of coping with both the workload and the quantitive side of the course?

If this is the case, i'm willing to do whatever is required to teach myself the basics.

Thanks!
Are you planning on doing a placement year?
My boyfriend was/is in a similar situation to you. He graduated with BA International Management, once he realised that he wanted to pursue Economics or Finance during his time at university, it was already too late for him to switch courses, he also didn't do a year placement which would have been of great benefit to him. So, instead he has now graduated and is currently working in the finance services industry to then pursue either a Masters in finance or MBA.
The reason why I asked if whether you're planning on doing a year placement or not is because, getting a financial based placement with companies like the big 4 (Kmpg, Ernst and young, delottite and PWC), in an investment bank, or any financial based company, will demonstrate to them (universities) that you have the skills needed to do the masters. One thing students tend to forget is that universities also accept students based on the experience they have, if your experience matches the majority of the requirements + your grades for your course, am sure you will be accepted.

Also based on the fact that you are doing business management it will be much easier for u to do a masters in Finance, rather then a masters in Economics. Just like was mentioned before, Economics is very mathematically based and if you do not have a strong background in Economics there's a higher chance that you will not be accepted into this course.


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Mr.Econometrics
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(Original post by x-Natalie-x)
Thanks for your reply. By quantitative, I meant finance based (Finance and Accounting module), and I know for certain we only 'touched' on it.

I don't mean to sound too big for my boots, or undermine the people studying Economics at MSc by suggesting it's 'easy' in any way. I think deep down I know that my current course just won't cut it in terms of providing me with the knowledge required to apply for the MSc course. I just feel like I'm not challenging myself enough currently, and this concerns me.

I believe you're right in that possibly moving to an Economics BSc would be the best, and the only route or alternatively re-evauating my options and making a different career choice.

Yeeesh. I need to be more decisive. :unimpressed:

Thanks again, and good luck with the rest of your degree :rolleyes:
Fair enough, but the pure Mathematics at LSE will be a lot different. Yeah, I agree that you weren't trying to undermine the course, but I was just pointing out that it's insanely difficult at that level, especially at LSE (3rd in the world for Econ I believe). I certainly advise you to re-think this a lot over the next few weeks before university starts again, because a Masters is very expensive, and Student Finance don't give you a loan for it. Another thing is, a Masters tends to be more useful for those who want to be Economists rather than working in Banking/Finance; a Masters at LSE wouldn't necessarily make a bank choose you over another individual who did better at a top university at Undergraduate level. Just make sure you feel the £23,000 odd is worth it. You're welcome, feel free to PM me if you've got any more questions before University starts about Economics etc. More than willing to help. All the best in your degree, and I hope you make the right choice! (Economics rules)
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sj27
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(Original post by NuriaM)
The reason why I asked if whether you're planning on doing a year placement or not is because, getting a financial based placement with companies like the big 4 (Kmpg, Ernst and young, delottite and PWC), in an investment bank, or any financial based company, will demonstrate to them (universities) that you have the skills needed to do the masters. One thing students tend to forget is that universities also accept students based on the experience they have, if your experience matches the majority of the requirements + your grades for your course, am sure you will be accepted.

Also based on the fact that you are doing business management it will be much easier for u to do a masters in Finance, rather then a masters in Economics. Just like was mentioned before, Economics is very mathematically based and if you do not have a strong background in Economics there's a higher chance that you will not be accepted into this course.


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If the advice above about work experience is supposed to be for an economics masters, it's absolutely incorrect. There is absolutely no way a year of internship - even if it was in an economics department (which would be difficult to get without the right training anyway) - would be seen as equivalent by any decent university to the academic requirements for a masters in economics. Work experience is incredibly difficult as an avenue for meeting requirements for just about any masters anyway, and would absolutely not be the route for one such as economics which requires specific technical expertise. I would be highly surprised indeed to find any decent university accepting a year of the most junior work experience as equivalent to meeting the requirements for any masters in fact...

I agree it is easier to get onto a straight finance course, simply because some of them are less restrictive in what they require as prerequisites.

I also agree that unless you specifically want to be an economist, it is probably not worth doing an economics msc.
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Protagoras
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I graduated in business management

Definitely do a placement (I didn't )..

Well finance is looking at analysing a business - it's share price - annual reports - AGM (if public) and getting to grips with the company's strategy - is it cutting costs? is it expanding?

As a manager you will want to have a good head on your shoulders about the financial workings of a business.

- Choose optional modules that will compliment your goals.

I chose an optional module: 'small business and entrepreneurship', thinking as we had to present for finance (bank / private equity) which meant analysing the credentials and the viability of financial projections. With this I could work in a bank and manage lending to small businesses.

LSE is very prestigious and with that very competitive. (So be realistic, it's not the end of the world!) Queen Mary (which has a private equity module) looks like a good bet for a name that will be something in London banks. I personally think Cass is too pricey.

Consider going for the ACA (accountancy) and the CFA (chartered financial analyst).

Your ability to analyse operations will be more critical than analysing the economic environment.
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NuriaM
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(Original post by sj27)
If the advice above about work experience is supposed to be for an economics masters, it's absolutely incorrect. There is absolutely no way a year of internship - even if it was in an economics department (which would be difficult to get without the right training anyway) - would be seen as equivalent by any decent university to the academic requirements for a masters in economics. Work experience is incredibly difficult as an avenue for meeting requirements for just about any masters anyway, and would absolutely not be the route for one such as economics which requires specific technical expertise. I would be highly surprised indeed to find any decent university accepting a year of the most junior work experience as equivalent to meeting the requirements for any masters in fact...

I agree it is easier to get onto a straight finance course, simply because some of them are less restrictive in what they require as prerequisites.

I also agree that unless you specifically want to be an economist, it is probably not worth doing an economics msc.
The advice I gave is for finance based masters, I mentioned at the bottom of my comment that it will be extremely difficult for them to do a masters in economics with a business management degree


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sj27
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(Original post by NuriaM)
The advice I gave is for finance based masters, I mentioned at the bottom of my comment that it will be extremely difficult for them to do a masters in economics with a business management degree


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The comment doesn't make much sense for finance masters as many of them accept any undergrad degree - including the one at LSE.
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NuriaM
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(Original post by sj27)
The comment doesn't make much sense for finance based masters as many of them accept any undergrad degree.
But u still stand out if u have relevant experience in your chosen field then just with a undergraduate degree, that was my personal advice to them that is all.


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sj27
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(Original post by NuriaM)
But u still stand out if u have relevant experience in your chosen field then just with a undergraduate degree, that was my personal advice to them that is all.


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Then perhaps you should say what you mean, not things like "if your experience matches the majority of the requirements + your grades for your course, am sure you will be accepted".
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NuriaM
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(Original post by sj27)
Then perhaps you should say what you mean, not things like "if your experience matches the majority of the requirements + your grades for your course, am sure you will be accepted".
Thank you for pointing that out


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