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    Hello, I'm just going into year 11 and I'm wondering what:
    1. How long you revised for?
    2. When did you start?
    3. What grades you got?
    4. Any tips for essay writing subjects? (English lit and lang, History, Classics and Humanities)

    I need help mainly with the humanities subjects as at the moment in triple science and math I am working at A* and the rest at c/b.

    Thank you
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    (Original post by IamBulgarian)
    Hello, I'm just going into year 11 and I'm wondering what:
    1. How long you revised for?
    2. When did you start?
    3. What grades you got?
    4. Any tips for essay writing subjects? (English lit and lang, History, Classics and Humanities)

    I need help mainly with the humanities subjects as at the moment in triple science and math I am working at A* and the rest at c/b.

    Thank you
    Hi, I received my results yesterday and I got 3A*s (history,english lit,re), 5As (english lang,biology,chemistry,maths,ICT ), and 2Bs (physics and spanish). I didn't set myself a time limit when I did my revision - I gave myself a goal instead. For example, I used revision cards as my main technique, so I would say to myself I needed to remember 15 revision cards that evening (with breaks in between) - the amount of revision cards you learn in an evening/day is up to you, it depends on your memory and what you feel capable of. I also made posters around Easter and stuck them all over my house so I would read them when I went to the kitchen etc. I started revising from Easter, but I worked up to the amount of revision I did each day,like when I started I went on BBC Bitesize,made posters etc, then I would work up to remembering revision cards. And yes all this did work!
    For essay subjects, I would say practise essay technique and learn an essay plan so that in the exam you know exactly how do write it. For history,know dates and events inside out! English lang is just practise questions,english lit - I picked 2/3 quotes for each poem so it was easier to write about in the exam (bitesize is fab for english lit)! The books are the same,pick 2/3 quotes or events from each chapter or even do chapter summaries - it does help.
    I'm very sorry that this has turned into an essay! I hope this has helped!
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    (Original post by VickyIsabelle)
    Hi, I received my results yesterday and I got 3A*s (history,english lit,re), 5As (english lang,biology,chemistry,maths,ICT ), and 2Bs (physics and spanish). I didn't set myself a time limit when I did my revision - I gave myself a goal instead. For example, I used revision cards as my main technique, so I would say to myself I needed to remember 15 revision cards that evening (with breaks in between) - the amount of revision cards you learn in an evening/day is up to you, it depends on your memory and what you feel capable of. I also made posters around Easter and stuck them all over my house so I would read them when I went to the kitchen etc. I started revising from Easter, but I worked up to the amount of revision I did each day,like when I started I went on BBC Bitesize,made posters etc, then I would work up to remembering revision cards. And yes all this did work!
    For essay subjects, I would say practise essay technique and learn an essay plan so that in the exam you know exactly how do write it. For history,know dates and events inside out! English lang is just practise questions,english lit - I picked 2/3 quotes for each poem so it was easier to write about in the exam (bitesize is fab for english lit)! The books are the same,pick 2/3 quotes or events from each chapter or even do chapter summaries - it does help.
    I'm very sorry that this has turned into an essay! I hope this has helped!
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    Thank you for the detailed explanation and there great results :3 well done
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    Its okay,hope it helped and thanks
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    Oops :erm:

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    Hey there! I'm going into year 11 too!

    I took a few exams last year, including some for my English coursework and my Core Science exams.

    So far, I have:

    - Core science (A*)
    - English Lit (Mockinbird is all I have done so far - 40/40 (A*)
    - English Language, descriptive, narrative and spoken language all 19/20
    - Spanish Writing - A* (30/30)

    In terms of revising for science, my advise would be to start revising quite a while in advance and do so gradually, rather than trying to do it all during the last couple of days, which I learned the hard way turns you into a, quite hysterical, ball of stress. Making flash cards from the information is a good idea, putting questions on one side of the card and answers on the other is really helpful, as well as making sure to evenly distribute your time between the subjects if you feel that you are equally good at all of them, or to focus on the ones that give you greater difficulty.

    Studying past papers and mark schemes is really helpful, especially for science, because there is a likelihood - as happened with the GCSE Core papers in June this year - that many of the questions or very similar questions will have appeared on past exam papers, as there are only so many questions that the exam can ask from a certain amount of information that you are required to learn for the syllabus. (Especially in ISAs, knowing the mark scheme will give you the techniques to use to answer every question how they want it to be answered.)

    In terms of English literature exams, I think that one of the best things that you can do in your essays to improve your grade (it really helped me on my Mockingbird essay) is to research the context of the texts that you are studying thoroughly in relation to the actions of the characters and the themes that are in the text, as well as the author's own background and what messages they may be trying to coney to an audience as a result of their own situation/experiences/views and the time in which the text was written.

    For example, the thing that (I think, anyway) got me such high marks in my first English literature essay was including comparisons between the town in the story and the author's own childhood town, as well as making contextual references to the time period in which the book was written and certain quotes in the book that gave clues as to when the book was set. For instance, there is a quote 'Maycomb had recently been told it had nothing to fear but fear itself' which is a close reference to (not an exact quotation from) Franklin D. Roosevelt's First Inaugural Speech, which took place in early 1933, which therefore suggests that the story is set the summer following this, which makes it set during the Great Depression. This, therefore, sets up the context for many of the events that happen in the story and creates a basis for them to be based on racial prejudice as it was still particularly significant during this time in the southern states of America, despite it being many years after the abolition of slavery. I also talked about how an event which took place during the author's childhood may have been her inspiration for the crime/trial that took place in the story, as there is much similarity there too.


    Stuff like that helps a lot - it shows the examiner that you have a thorough understanding of the context in which the text was written and the basis for the events that happen in the book. (Obviously that was for To Kill a Mockingbird, but it can be applied to other texts that you are studying too -
    I don't know which ones you are studying so I can't really help you on that!)

    For English Language, keep a close eye on your spelling and grammar. I made two spelling errors in one of my writing pieces which prevented me from getting full marks. Also, for the top grades you need to use adventurous punctuation and vocabularly, as well as making sure that your content is imaginative and fits in with your given title.

    For humanities subjects (I can't help you with history or classics, neither of which my school offers), I always find that including a lot of facts and explaining the significance of the event (which unfortunately means memorising, ugh) is really helpful for providing a strong basis for any type of humanitarian essay.

    If you're taking languages, then my biggest advice would be to pay really close attention to your grammar and variety of language. Use what you have already had checked and that you know is correct to help you to write your piece, and if you are unsure of something don't use it. However, you want to make sure that you don't just use the simple structures that are shown to you, but instead you want to show your understanding of the language by including more adventurous things that you can find by searching around on online reference forums and in other language textbooks.

    I hope this helps a little?!

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