Mickey mouse degrees by non Mickey mouse universities? Watch

GandalfWhite
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Would top universities waste their time on mickey mouse degrees? http://www.businessinsider.my/what-p.../#.U_cNEoEZ7qA
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godd
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Yes they do.

It's all income for them.

LSE do a tonne of "mickey mouse" degrees. Though the LSE name makes up for the less academic subject.
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jelly1000
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(Original post by GandalfWhite)
Would top universities waste their time on mickey mouse degrees? http://www.businessinsider.my/what-p.../#.U_cNEoEZ7qA
Depends what your idea of mickey mouse is. Not everyone whose academic is good at science/technological degrees- I know we need more engineers but I'm terrible at practical things.
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GandalfWhite
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Some consider business degrees mickey mouse degrees, yet they are offered by top universities like Harvard, Stanford, MIT, LSE and LBS. Are these mickey mouse Professors of Mickey Mouse subjects not respected by theur peers? So who is right? The top universities and their peers or those who may not know or appreciate the academic rigor that are also in so called mickey mouse disciplines?
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godd
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LSE could do a degree in People Management and because of the LSE name, you would have people paying top $$$
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GandalfWhite
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(Original post by godd)
LSE could do a degree in People Management and because of the LSE name, you would have people paying top $$$
The list goes beyond just LSE which is only no8. Why are you so focused on bashing LSE?
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godd
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(Original post by GandalfWhite)
The list goes beyond just LSE which is only no8. Why are you so focused on bashing LSE?
Obviously.


I'll bash Imperial from now on.
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Edminzodo
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Harry Potter modules at Durham . . .

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GandalfWhite
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Ah.... so..... only the tall poppies qualify to be bashed. Bash on then .... tell everyone why they should not study at the best universities esp their mickey mouse degrees. Run down their graduates even as they get paid above average salaries working for international companies who should know better thsn to just rely on the reputation of universities such as LSE. That way, everyone shall know the truth and the truth shall set them free.
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lozasaurus99
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Mickey mouse degrees= sociology/art/sports/media studies/gardening/fashion & beauty/btec hnd etc etc..

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GandalfWhite
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(Original post by jelly1000)
Depends what your idea of mickey mouse is. Not everyone whose academic is good at science/technological degrees- I know we need more engineers but I'm terrible at practical things.
Most do not notice that career progression starts from a functional role to a general role. Functional and technical expertise are highly regarded and important. Most functional people underestimate the impact and importance of soft mickey mouse skills which only some develop over time and move on to management, general management and then to top strategic management.

Don't underestimate mickey mouse degrees such as sociology or politics. People with those degrees are better leaders and they can impact on a nation.
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returnmigrant
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The biggest Mickey Mouse subject that is a even offered by Cambridge is Creative WRiting.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by returnmigrant)
The biggest Mickey Mouse subject that is a even offered by Cambridge is Creative WRiting.
Look, if wasn't for their MSts in creative writing Wordsworth would have been wandering lonely as a hippopotamus; Tennyson would have preferred his Charge of the Heavy Brigade, Sylvia Plath would have been intelligible and Marlowe would never have written "To be or not to be".
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Clip
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Look, if wasn't for their MSts in creative writing Wordsworth would have been wandering lonely as a hippopotamus; Tennyson would have preferred his Charge of the Heavy Brigade, Sylvia Plath would have been intelligible and Marlowe would never have written "To be or not to be".
Cheddar to the right of them,
Cheddar to the left of them,
Cheddar in front of them
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Okorange
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(Original post by GandalfWhite)
Most do not notice that career progression starts from a functional role to a general role. Functional and technical expertise are highly regarded and important. Most functional people underestimate the impact and importance of soft mickey mouse skills which only some develop over time and move on to management, general management and then to top strategic management.

Don't underestimate mickey mouse degrees such as sociology or politics. People with those degrees are better leaders and they can impact on a nation.
Studying politics or sociology doesn't make you a better leader. Only the leaders in those classes ever become politicians. Nothing about those classes actually teaches leadership.

All it takes to be a good politician are good people skills and leadership. Thats why most politicians never did politics in university. You don't need to know the inner workings of politics and the history of political systems to be a politician. I would argue most politicians don't and what they do know they learned on the job.

The reason people consider sociology and politics mickey mouse degrees is that they aren't particularly hard to learn. It doesn't make most people quiver with fear when they are told to study sociology or politics whereas for physics and maths it may. The other thing is that what you gain from those specific subjects is just what you learn in the course. You'll probably be a better writer but unless they make you give speeches you probably aren't going to be a better presenter. Any other "life experiences" were probably gained outside the classroom. Most people with those degrees don't actually use their degrees, its just a general "arts" degree, you'll come out with better writing skills and maybe a different way of thinking but the actual facts you learned are most likely useless for your career.
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nerdcake
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(Original post by Okorange)
Thats why most politicians never did politics in university.
This country's political class is overrun with public school boys who did PPE at Oxford. That's nothing to do with the degree content and everything to do with the elitist and insular nature of the top tier of politics, but you're still wrong.

As an aside, I would quiver in fear if you asked me to study Sociology or Politics. Not only would the essay writing drive me insane, but I like to be able to apply rigorous scientific methods to arguments. In the case of political and sociological ideologies, that's more or less impossible.
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Okorange
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(Original post by nerdcake)
This country's political class is overrun with public school boys who did PPE at Oxford. That's nothing to do with the degree content and everything to do with the elitist and insular nature of the top tier of politics, but you're still wrong.

As an aside, I would quiver in fear if you asked me to study Sociology or Politics. Not only would the essay writing drive me insane, but I like to be able to apply rigorous scientific methods to arguments. In the case of political and sociological ideologies, that's more or less impossible.
That might just be you. I think more people are afraid of maths than they are of a sociology degree.

I knew someone would cite the PM and the opposition leader as examples. Except the average MP did not do a politics degree and that was what I was referring to. And like you said, it had very little to do with what they learned (sure if you want to be in the leadership you'll probably need to know some history/theory but stuff you can learn on the job), everything to do with who they are, their personal skills and who they know/got to know.
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nerdcake
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(Original post by Okorange)
That might just be you. I think more people are afraid of maths than they are of a sociology degree.

I knew someone would cite the PM and the opposition leader as examples. Except the average MP did not do a politics degree and that was what I was referring to. And like you said, it had very little to do with what they learned (sure if you want to be in the leadership you'll probably need to know some history/theory but stuff you can learn on the job), everything to do with who they are, their personal skills and who they know/got to know.
I didn't claim everybody was scared of sociology. I know I'm weird

Just to be pedantic, I didn't cite the PM and opposition leader as examples. I just said that most of the top tier have Oxford PPE degrees. That includes most of the cabinet and shadow cabinet (ie anyone who could potentially wield any power). It has **** all to do with anything about them personally or even any skills they have. It is just a self perpetuating vicious circle in which the people at the top support people who are just like them.

The average MP is involved in very little real politics, and with all the personal skills in the world they will still find it hugely difficult to break into the elitist 'top'.

But whatever. I don't even think Politics is a 'Mickey Mouse' subject (though Sociology is). I just dropped in to argue one point about politicians with PPE degrees.
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Snufkin
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(Original post by Okorange)
The reason people consider sociology and politics mickey mouse degrees is that they aren't particularly hard to learn. It doesn't make most people quiver with fear when they are told to study sociology or politics whereas for physics and maths it may.
As a medic who plainly has zero experience studying sociology or politics, you are in no position to judge these subject's difficulty or speculate on their worth.

Your second statement is absurdly simplistic. Difficulty is relative, someone who is naturally mathematical and who probably hasn't studied any arts subjects since their GCSEs would be equally disconcerted if they were told to study sociology, or any non-STEM subject for that matter.
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GandalfWhite
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(Original post by Samual)
As a medic who plainly has zero experience studying sociology or politics, you are in no position to judge these subject's difficulty or speculate on their worth.

Your second statement is absurdly simplistic. Difficulty is relative, someone who is naturally mathematical and who probably hasn't studied any arts subjects since their GCSEs would be equally disconcerted if they were told to study sociology, or any non-STEM subject for that matter.
Yep. Right brain left brain and all that. And sometimes very smart people may hv high IQ but not as blessed in EQ.
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