Books similar to To Kill a Mockingbird?

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LavishLinguist
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#1
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I read To Kill a Mockingbird a few years ago for the first time and now we are studying it for one of our GCSE English texts at school, which I absolutely love!

I was wondering if anyone knows of any similar books that are set around that time period in the southern states of America because I think I would particularly enjoy reading some more books like it!

Also, does anyone know of any good novels set around the WW2 period that are set in France/Germany/The Netherlands, because I particularly enjoy those too!


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Mr...
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:bump:
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Jezebelle
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The Color Purple deals with similar issues though it's more explicit. I did enjoy it but the tone is quite different to Mockingbird.

On the WWII front maybe Boy In The Striped Pajamas? It's also from a child's perspective.
The Book Thief is an amazing book, I'd recommend it to anyone.
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labby
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Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry. Sorry can't remember who it is by but it is from the point of view of a young black girl living in the South in the 1930s and it is really good.
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thewishfulwriter
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(Original post by Jezebelle)
The Color Purple deals with similar issues though it's more explicit. I did enjoy it but the tone is quite different to Mockingbird.

On the WWII front maybe Boy In The Striped Pajamas? It's also from a child's perspective.
The Book Thief is an amazing book, I'd recommend it to anyone.
Agreed- especially on The Book Thief idea. A brilliant book!


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LavishLinguist
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Thanks guys I just really enjoy historical fiction stories!


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Mackay
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The Book Thief is great.

I'd give One Hundred Years of Solitude a punt, too. Think you'd like it.
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Tochai
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If you liked To Kill a Mockingbird, you should look into In Cold Blood by Truman Capote. Its got a similar southern court-case kind of vibe, if that's what appeals to you about Mockingbird. Harper Lee was also involved in Capote's research, which is a nice link between the two and may be of some use in your GCSE if there's any kind of credit for literary context.

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison deals with a lot of the same themes as Mockingbird, so it would be worth a punt if you're particularly into the race relations and gender roles in the American south bits of Mockingbird. Fair warning though, its pretty graphic at times. Still, its really good and probably worth powering through even if you're the squeamish type.
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LavishLinguist
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(Original post by Tochai)
If you liked To Kill a Mockingbird, you should look into In Cold Blood by Truman Capote. Its got a similar southern court-case kind of vibe, if that's what appeals to you about Mockingbird. Harper Lee was also involved in Capote's research, which is a nice link between the two and may be of some use in your GCSE if there's any kind of credit for literary context.

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison deals with a lot of the same themes as Mockingbird, so it would be worth a punt if you're particularly into the race relations and gender roles in the American south bits of Mockingbird. Fair warning though, its pretty graphic at times. Still, its really good and probably worth powering through even if you're the squeamish type.
Thanks, that is more what I was thinking of - racial relations and gender roles in southern America - I just didn't know how to phrase it!



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Solivagant
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I have nothing to add to this, but did people actually like To Kill a Mockingbird? I finished reading it yesterday and I thought it was complete tripe. The worst book I've ever read.
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LavishLinguist
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(Original post by Solivagant)
I have nothing to add to this, but did people actually like To Kill a Mockingbird? I finished reading it yesterday and I thought it was complete tripe. The worst book I've ever read.
Yeah, I really enjoyed it. I'm really interested in racial (and other forms of) prejudice and novels set in periods of American/world history, so that's probably why.




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Stannisbaratheon
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To kill a pigeon
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Mackay
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(Original post by Solivagant)
I have nothing to add to this, but did people actually like To Kill a Mockingbird? I finished reading it yesterday and I thought it was complete tripe. The worst book I've ever read.
The worst book you've ever read? Surely hyperbole?
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Solivagant
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(Original post by Mackay)
The worst book you've ever read? Surely hyperbole?
Worst book I've ever read. Nothing happened. First 27 chapters were completely dull. Chapter 28 was okay. Chapters 29-31 were crap.
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Mackay
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(Original post by Solivagant)
Chapter 28 was okay. .
Thank Christ you enjoyed it.
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Comus
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(Original post by LavishLinguist)
Yeah, I really enjoyed it. I'm really interested in racial (and other forms of) prejudice and novels set in periods of American/world history, so that's probably why.
Some John Steinbeck, perhaps?
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Starrstruck
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The Help. There's a movie adaptation too


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Solivagant
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(Original post by LavishLinguist)
Yeah, I really enjoyed it. I'm really interested in racial (and other forms of) prejudice and novels set in periods of American/world history, so that's probably why.




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Have you read Grapes of Wrath?
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Solivagant
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(Original post by Mackay)
Thank Christ you enjoyed it.
It was awful.
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subjunctivehistorian
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(Original post by LavishLinguist)
Thanks guys I just really enjoy historical fiction stories!


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Hi! I'd really recommend The Reader by Bernard Schlink. It's about WW2 but from a really interesting perspective and also discusses the idea of literacy and thoughts being linked. It's great!

Historical fiction is the absolute best! I've had a whole summer of reading books and now I have to read Tess of the Durbervilles for college...

Being told what I have to read is like preventing free speech.
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