Why do we lose things, before finding them in a place that we've already checked?

Watch
RocketCiaranJ
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Is this innate? Do we lose things in this way to force ourselves to keep moving, in an attempt to find them? By moving, we more likely to find food and resources; and even make ourselves less vulnerable to predators, because we're not staying in the same place.
0
reply
pjm600
Badges: 18
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
I'd imagine a much simpler explanation is that our memories aren't strong enough to remember the position of all the objects we posses.
0
reply
KeepYourChinUp
Badges: 17
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
Because when you're looking for something, especially when it's next to a lot of clutter you tend to glaze over the total objects rather than look at each specific object. I'm sure if you had 0 objects in your draw and looked in your draw, you'd see your keys.
0
reply
RocketCiaranJ
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by KeepYourChinUp)
Because when you're looking for something, especially when it's next to a lot of clutter you tend to glaze over the total objects rather than look at each specific object. I'm sure if you had 0 objects in your draw and looked in your draw, you'd see your keys.
Makes sense. Really, I'm not sure why I posted the last couple of threads. Anyway why is our body so adept at fighting disease and doing all of its 'things' yet we have never evolved a brain capable of properly retaining information - which would be a necessary survival requirement.
0
reply
KeepYourChinUp
Badges: 17
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
(Original post by RocketCiaranJ)
Makes sense. Really, I'm not sure why I posted the last couple of threads. Anyway why is our body so adept at fighting disease and doing all of its 'things' yet we have never evolved a brain capable of properly retaining information - which would be a necessary survival requirement.
I'm not sure what you mean exactly but our brains are quite capable of retaining enough information for us to survive, we are here are we not? lol.

In regards to memory, the brain actively filters out what it thinks isn't important or worth remembering. It's called stimuli and our brains block out a portion of incoming stimuli, it has to for us to keep our sanity. For example right now as you're reading this comment, you're probably sitting in a chair, looking at a monitor, which is on a desk, which might have objects on them etc but you don't process this information... those objects are there and even when you use them you don't actually acknowledge them, that is because your brain doesn't see them as important.

There is a mental illness called low latent inhibition where your brain doesn't block out the "clutter" stimuli and you process everything. People with a high level of intelligence can handle the stimuli and will most likely become extremely creative, perhaps even a genius. Those with low or average intelligence will most likely spend the rest of their lives doped up on pills and in a psych ward because they just can't handle the extreme amount of information.

I hope this sheds some light on why the brain blocks out junk information.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Would you give consent for uni's to contact your parent/trusted person in a mental health crisis?

Yes - my parent/carer (67)
33.33%
Yes - a trusted person (54)
26.87%
No (53)
26.37%
I'm not sure (27)
13.43%

Watched Threads

View All