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    (Original post by Cellardore)
    i like focusing on one particular person. But that does sound good. Just have to find a dictator who was actually interesting, lol. There's alot of wierd ones tho:rolleyes:
    i dont know what type of history your doing but a good tip i found is to link it with what your going to be studying in the summer of christmas. for example,

    we studied Lenin and Communist Russia, so alot of people asked questions such as "to what extent was Lenin crucial to the Ocober Revolution" or "was Lenin a red tsar by inclination?" the advantage of that is that for that paper you need to know historical schools of thought anyway, so your effectively revising for your exam and doing an interesting piece of coursework that covers all the assessment objectives.

    i opted to study Hitler (a little bit boring I know) and used a quote in the title, which immediatly allowed me to discuss controversy. Again, advantage of studying Hitler is that it covers what you have already done, basically doing most of your work for you...examiners can't mark you down for that!!

    what ever you do do though, is have a look at the set questions and try to set your work around that. For example, although I was looking at Hitler and the nazi dictatorship, i also applied it to the broader question of 'can individuals shape history?'...this shows your looking beyond your coursework, broadly and into the future which displays your a top grade candidate.
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    Very true. We were advised to make our assignment cover the whole timeframe of our course (AS and A2), apparently you get more marks for that. In my case it was mid-19th to mid-20th century.
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    (Original post by B00kwOrm)
    Very true. We were advised to make our assignment the whole timeframe of our course (AS and A2), apparently you get more marks for that. In my case it was mid-19th to mid-20th century.
    Someone a couple of years ago did the Eygptians (how about that for total off topic! ) :rolleyes: She ended up getting full marks and our teacher knew nothing about the subject!
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    (Original post by Cellardore)
    Someone a couple of years ago did the Eygptians (how about that for total off topic! ) :rolleyes: She ended up getting full marks and our teacher knew nothing about the subject!
    Yeah, you don't have to do a topic that falls within your history course. But we were strongly encouraged to do it and the teacher supervising our personal studies had a PhD in British social history, and trust me, it doesn't hurt to have an expert on your period to help you! So you might want to choose something your teacher knows about, it can be quite handy. For example, my teacher gave me literature and knew all the dates off by heart, it really helps.
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    (Original post by B00kwOrm)
    Yeah, you don't have to do a topic that falls within your history course. But we were strongly encouraged to do it and the teacher supervising our personal studies had a PhD in British social history, and trust me, it doesn't hurt to have an expert on your period to help you! So you might want to choose something your teacher knows about, it can be quite handy. For example, my teacher gave me literature and knew all the dates off by heart, it really helps.
    lol, yeah that is true. Are teacher is an expert on the French Revolution, but i'm a bit rusty on that subject. hmmmm....all the better to consider doing it! :rolleyes: could be interesting.
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    (Original post by Cellardore)
    lol, yeah that is true. Are teacher is an expert on the French Revolution, but i'm a bit rusty on that subject. hmmmm....all the better to consider doing it! :rolleyes: could be interesting.
    Yeah, why not? I like the French Revolution, great topic!!
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    (Original post by B00kwOrm)
    Yeah, you don't have to do a topic that falls within your history course. But we were strongly encouraged to do it and the teacher supervising our personal studies had a PhD in British social history, and trust me, it doesn't hurt to have an expert on your period to help you! So you might want to choose something your teacher knows about, it can be quite handy. For example, my teacher gave me literature and knew all the dates off by heart, it really helps.
    yeh i agree, my teacher specialises in india and europe and warfare, so I probably should have taken advantage of that. although to be honest, hitler is such a well known subject I dont think I missed out too much on studying the effects of his leadership.
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    what question would be a good one to pose on the French Rev. as i haven't studied this subject at all just thought it would be interesting as i have never done it.
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    (Original post by Cellardore)
    what question would be a good one to pose on the French Rev. as i haven't studied this subject at all just thought it would be interesting as i have never done it.
    hmmnnn i only know about the type of guns, strategy, tactics etc used during the revolutions (had to study changing nature of warfare at A level) so im not able to help much...what about asking your teacher for pointers?
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    Yeah, or you could read a couple of books on the French Revolution over the summer holidays... They make for good reading!
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    (Original post by B00kwOrm)
    Yeah, or you could read a couple of books on the French Revolution over the summer holidays... They make for good reading!

    Thomas Carlyle - The French Revolution: A history


    you just can't beat Carlyle - he's amazing
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    (Original post by B00kwOrm)
    Yeah, or you could read a couple of books on the French Revolution over the summer holidays... They make for good reading!

    what about my membership? how can you forget me? i am erudite in the study of History !!!!
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    ok guys, just thought of a question. Not the most original i must admit, but i've done a bit reseach:

    "to what extent in relation to other factors was social class a cause of the French Revolution?"

    not sure about the "class" bit, but i can't think of anything else to write in there

    how does that sound?
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    (Original post by John Paul Jones)
    what about my membership? how can you forget me? i am erudite in the study of History !!!!
    I'm sorry! Just added you... Btw, who's John Paul Jones? The name rings a bell...:confused:
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    (Original post by B00kwOrm)
    I'm sorry! Just added you... Btw, who's John Paul Jones? The name rings a bell...:confused:

    lol cheers - he was a Scotsman who joined the Americans during the American Revolution, and he 'captured' a small town in Scotland with his ship from America lol and he sunk a British galleon in the Irish sea lol
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    (Original post by Cellardore)
    ok guys, just thought of a question. Not the most original i must admit, but i've done a bit reseach:

    "to what extent in relation to other factors was social class a cause of the French Revolution?"

    not sure about the "class" bit, but i can't think of anything else to write in there

    how does that sound?
    Interesting question. Far too tired to write coherent response, but the class bit leads for interesting discussion on the works of Marx, and his constant references to 1789.
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    (Original post by teamvillage)
    Interesting question. Far too tired to write coherent response, but the class bit leads for interesting discussion on the works of Marx, and his constant references to 1789.

    not at all - Thomas Carlyle is the authoritative figure whence concerning writing on the issue of the French Revolution
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    (Original post by John Paul Jones)
    not at all - Thomas Carlyle is the authoritative figure whence concerning writing on the issue of the French Revolution
    do you think that would be an interesting question to use for my personal study?
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    (Original post by Cellardore)
    do you think that would be an interesting question to use for my personal study?
    I know you're not talking to me , but I'd say read that book he's talking about sounds very good and see what you think after that.
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    (Original post by John Paul Jones)
    not at all - Thomas Carlyle is the authoritative figure whence concerning writing on the issue of the French Revolution
    no he has got a piont, there are Marxist/classic interpretation /the revisionist critique for social conflict

    i was told that the question (previous) will be too much work to do, so i have narrowed it down to social class or could i do louis the 16th?
 
 
 

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