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#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
I'm thinking about doing an English degree at univeristy (which will hopefully be in 2015) and I was looking at modules at different universities and wondering how much literature study there is in a course? I only take english language for A level and not literature, and I'm just worried I'm going to look really stupid because I don't read, or particularly enjoy, old english literature (shakespeare, jane austen novels, etc). Any responses would be appreciated!
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The Empire Odyssey
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#2
Report 7 years ago
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(Original post by s-w)
I'm thinking about doing an English degree at univeristy (which will hopefully be in 2015) and I was looking at modules at different universities and wondering how much literature study there is in a course? I only take english language for A level and not literature, and I'm just worried I'm going to look really stupid because I don't read, or particularly enjoy, old english literature (shakespeare, jane austen novels, etc). Any responses would be appreciated!
Unfortunately, in order to study English Literature at degree level, universities require all their applicant to at least have an A-level in either English Literature or English Language and Literature (combined). Many universities will not look at your application with only English Language A-level, as the rest of their applicants will have an English Lit A-level.

Some universities (I must admit not very well respected/vigorous ones) do accept English Language A-level, but this is very rare. If you study English Language A-level, you will only encounter Middle English. At uni, you will most likely study Old English if you were to do an English Language degree.

I must admit, if you don't enjoy Shakespeare, I honestly don't think you are the best fit for an English degree. Shakespeare's plays is just as important in Literature as it is in Language; as he changed the a lot of English during his time that we use in our everyday lives.

If you can't appreciate classic literature such as Austen, Dickens, Collins, etc then you would struggle with 1st year and 2nd year uni as they are mostly compulsory modules; such as the Restoration Era, Romantics and Victorians.

English Literature A-level is required for you to study English Literature at degree level. However, you might get away with applying to uni with English Lang and English Lit. Do you study History, Drama or perhaps Philosophy? If so, that would strengthen your application to study Literature. Language A-level doesn't give you the skill of close reading a fictional text; Language does for non-fiction. But all Lit modules are fictional texts. It also teaches you how to analyse character, settings, themes and A2 introduces you to Literary Criticism. All these specific things are what's needed for to study Lit at degree level; first year.

You should contact all your universities you plan to apply to and ask if they would consider you BEFORE you put them down.
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#3
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
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(Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
Unfortunately, in order to study English Literature at degree level, universities require all their applicant to at least have an A-level in either English Literature or English Language and Literature (combined). Many universities will not look at your application with only English Language A-level, as the rest of their applicants will have an English Lit A-level.

Some universities (I must admit not very well respected/vigorous ones) do accept English Language A-level, but this is very rare. If you study English Language A-level, you will only encounter Middle English. At uni, you will most likely study Old English if you were to do an English Language degree.

I must admit, if you don't enjoy Shakespeare, I honestly don't think you are the best fit for an English degree. Shakespeare's plays is just as important in Literature as it is in Language; as he changed the a lot of English during his time that we use in our everyday lives.

If you can't appreciate classic literature such as Austen, Dickens, Collins, etc then you would struggle with 1st year and 2nd year uni as they are mostly compulsory modules; such as the Restoration Era, Romantics and Victorians.

English Literature A-level is required for you to study English Literature at degree level. However, you might get away with applying to uni with English Lang and English Lit. Do you study History, Drama or perhaps Philosophy? If so, that would strengthen your application to study Literature. Language A-level doesn't give you the skill of close reading a fictional text; Language does for non-fiction. But all Lit modules are fictional texts. It also teaches you how to analyse character, settings, themes and A2 introduces you to Literary Criticism. All these specific things are what's needed for to study Lit at degree level; first year.

You should contact all your universities you plan to apply to and ask if they would consider you BEFORE you put them down.
Thank you for the helpful reply! I actually wasn't considering an English Lit degree but just an English degree, however I'm not sure how similar they actually are. I'm also considering English Language and Linguistics as I feel like I will enjoy it more.

Unfortunately my other A-Level subjects are Chemistry and Psychology, which probably won't strengthen my application.
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The Empire Odyssey
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#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by s-w)
Thank you for the helpful reply! I actually wasn't considering an English Lit degree but just an English degree, however I'm not sure how similar they actually are. I'm also considering English Language and Linguistics as I feel like I will enjoy it more.

Unfortunately my other A-Level subjects are Chemistry and Psychology, which probably won't strengthen my application.
Well it depends on as it varies from uni to uni. For example Edge Hill uni have a singles honour in "English", which has different modules from Language, Literature, Drama, Media and Creative Writing. Whereas Nottingham Trent "English" degree is only everything to do with Literature and modules associated with that.

You will have to research a lot more as it would just vary from uni to uni
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TritonSails
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#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
(Original post by s-w)
I'm thinking about doing an English degree at univeristy (which will hopefully be in 2015) and I was looking at modules at different universities and wondering how much literature study there is in a course? I only take english language for A level and not literature, and I'm just worried I'm going to look really stupid because I don't read, or particularly enjoy, old english literature (shakespeare, jane austen novels, etc). Any responses would be appreciated!
English degrees predominantly involve the study of literature, and Shakespeare and Jane Austen are not even that old. I think you really want a degree called "English Language", or maybe "Linguistics".
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joonyjoonbug
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#6
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far too late a reply but others may find it useful... probably a Linguistics course in and of itself may be of more interest, given more mathematical/scientific approach I saw to it from fellow students studying it (SOAS)
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