Who's your favourite composer and why?

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DylanJ96
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For me, my favourite composer has to be Beethoven.

Why? I find his music to be worthy of being described in the first place of all art which the music as my evidence for such a claim. There's something profoundly moving, fiercely passionate and everlastingly beautiful about his music - something which presents our humanity in a way more moving and accurate than anything I know of and, most probably, will ever know of. His music has a touching honesty to it, that I don't find as much in the works of other composers, which forces us to realise our own humanity. For me, Beethoven elevates music, and us in turn, to as close as we humans can get to the "divine"! His music forces us to engage with the bigger questions - freedom, brotherhood, our perception of beautiful and our very human nature, among others.

As well as his music, Beethoven the man is a miracle! He lived an awfully depressive life with a horrific childhood and countless heartbreaks; the women whom he admired didn't return his favors, his nephew tried to shoot himself after Beethoven's influence on him and the one thing which he lived for, his music, was robbed from him by his deafness which almost drove him to suicide if not for the salvation of his art! Out of this pitiful existence comes beautiful music of the most optimistic philosophy that had and has ever been conceived; full of love for humanity and wanting for universal brotherhood. To think that this music, the music of an eternal optimist, comes from someone like that (an apparently unpleasant man if not for his music who would likely be a pessimist) is just a miracle of the most humanistic kind. He always looks for the light at the end of the tunnel - always wanting to make us humans better in every sense of the word though his art and this is what makes his music so beautiful.

To me, Beethoven is the greatest genius with one, among many others, main message: when there is darkness, may we find light!
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metalthrashin'mad
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Can I count a duo?

[youtube]9Iaxe5K3Ljo/youtube]

Most classical to my own mind sounds a lot like a pompous display of technicality and soulless virtuousity, whereas AWVFTS really delve into soundscapes and emotions through the use of tone and minimalism. I've played this album so many times now, and it's still brilliant.
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overthelove
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For me, it has to be Tchaikovsky. I can't write an essay as beautiful as yours about why I enjoy his pieces, but since I was born my parents played some to me. For me, his pieces remind me of home, of a happy childhood, of serenity. Nothing ever makes me as happy as listening to some good ol' Tchaikovsky.
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DylanJ96
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(Original post by metalthrashin'mad)
Can I count a duo?

[youtube]9Iaxe5K3Ljo/youtube]

Most classical to my own mind sounds a lot like a pompous display of technicality and soulless virtuousity, whereas AWVFTS really delve into soundscapes and emotions through the use of tone and minimalism. I've played this album so many times now, and it's still brilliant.
Although I do understand that people interpret things diffidently (bit of a musical pun there ), I can say for a fact that most classical music is neither pompous nor a meaningless display of virtuosity. Someone else said to me that classical music is pompous and I responded like this:

"People see the world of classical music as mannered, civilised and pompous but I, for one, can't think of anything less mannered, civilised or pompous- it's terribly crude, in the best sense of the word, and universal!"

If music is pompous then it isn't good music, simple - good music is, and always will be, universal and open to everyone without the slightest snobbery and this is especially true of Beethoven's music which calls for universal brotherhood. It's how classical music is presented and perceived that makes it seem pompous. As for most classical music being "technicality and soulless virtuosity", all I can say is that, in all respect, you're completely wrong - again, in good music nothing is soulless but rather soulful which is true of most of the classical repertoire. Being technical is another thing as much classical music demands excellent technique from the players but it isn't technical in the sense that the music is only to do with structure and nothing else.
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Teh Smart One
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I love Debussy, not sure why, but his music calms me during revision


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metalthrashin'mad
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(Original post by DylanJ96)
Although I do understand that people interpret things diffidently (bit of a musical pun there ), I can say for a fact that most classical music is neither pompous nor a meaningless display of virtuosity. Someone else said to me that classical music is pompous and I responded like this:

"People see the world of classical music as mannered, civilised and pompous but I, for one, can't think of anything less mannered, civilised or pompous- it's terribly crude, in the best sense of the word, and universal!"

If music is pompous then it isn't good music, simple - good music is, and always will be, universal and open to everyone without the slightest snobbery and this is especially true of Beethoven's music which calls for universal brotherhood. It's how classical music is presented and perceived that makes it seem pompous. As for most classical music being "technicality and soulless virtuosity", all I can say is that, in all respect, you're completely wrong - again, in good music nothing is soulless but rather soulful which is true of most of the classical repertoire. Being technical is another thing as much classical music demands excellent technique from the players but it isn't technical in the sense that the music is only to do with structure and nothing else.
Would still much rather listen to A winged victory for the sullen, christina vantzou and stars of the lid.

Just far prefer modern classical.
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AnEvolvedApe
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#7
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Classical Composer: Bach
Modern Orchestral Composer: Jeremy Soule (Elder Scrolls)
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_NMcC_
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Impressionist: Debussy and Chopin dead tie. I love debussy's arabesque and Chopin's nocturne's equally

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6s49OKp6aE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m5qeuVOIbHk

Modern: Jimmy Page, Phenomenal technical guitarist and creative genius. My favourite is probably 'The song remains the same' closely followed by 'Achilles last stand'.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4m2FhRv8xF0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-Rf1I9htJk

All are best listened turned up loud with headphones on.
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aytuiq
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John Rutter - a musical genius.
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Gribby2
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John Barry- love the serenity of 'The Beyondness of Things,' and the theme for 'The Persuaders!' (great show too) is pretty snazzy.
I like the drama of Beethoven too, especially his 5th and 9th symphonies.
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username3079870
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(Original post by DylanJ96)
For me, my favourite composer has to be Beethoven.

Why? I find his music to be worthy of being described in the first place of all art which the music as my evidence for such a claim. There's something profoundly moving, fiercely passionate and everlastingly beautiful about his music - something which presents our humanity in a way more moving and accurate than anything I know of and, most probably, will ever know of. His music has a touching honesty to it, that I don't find as much in the works of other composers, which forces us to realise our own humanity. For me, Beethoven elevates music, and us in turn, to as close as we humans can get to the "divine"! His music forces us to engage with the bigger questions - freedom, brotherhood, our perception of beautiful and our very human nature, among others.

As well as his music, Beethoven the man is a miracle! He lived an awfully depressive life with a horrific childhood and countless heartbreaks; the women whom he admired didn't return his favors, his nephew tried to shoot himself after Beethoven's influence on him and the one thing which he lived for, his music, was robbed from him by his deafness which almost drove him to suicide if not for the salvation of his art! Out of this pitiful existence comes beautiful music of the most optimistic philosophy that had and has ever been conceived; full of love for humanity and wanting for universal brotherhood. To think that this music, the music of an eternal optimist, comes from someone like that (an apparently unpleasant man if not for his music who would likely be a pessimist) is just a miracle of the most humanistic kind. He always looks for the light at the end of the tunnel - always wanting to make us humans better in every sense of the word though his art and this is what makes his music so beautiful.

To me, Beethoven is the greatest genius with one, among many others, main message: when there is darkness, may we find light!
Just to be different and because I love Pictures of an Exhibition (especially The Great Gate of Kiev/The Bogatyr Gates) I'll say Mussorgsky:

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LlamaLikeEllie
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I love Chopin's nocturnes and waltzes. Also Debussy's pieces are so soothing and relaxing.
My favourite modern composer would have to be Ian Clarke on the flute. I love his pieces.
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Picnic1
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In classical terms, Holst. Venus in particular I find magical, haunting.
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gonzoid
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Debussy for study
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Picnic1
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#15
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You know, John Lennon was a great composer.

A weird thing is, for all the interviews John Lennon ever did, he rarely if ever spoke about the composition of his
music.

All you'd really glean from him is he liked bluesy rock and roll.

Despite the big range of his music, and his interest in childhood surrealism like Alice in Wonderland, he probably wouldn't have cared if he'd only gone down in history as a pretty good country rocker, a
Roger McGuinn really. He wasn't even interested in being a mystical force like Jim Morrison or, indeed on occasion, George Harrison. And yet he must have had a love/hate relationship at the very least with some classical music too.
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Euci
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Mike Oldfield. His music is fantastic.
Especially Tubular Bells
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khookie
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Chopin and Beethoven. I switch between the two, depending on what mood I'm in
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