why does Shakespeare use words like thee and thou in his poems?

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GnomeMage
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Is it english?
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simplylldxo
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Of course it's English, it's old English however.
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karmacrunch
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Seriously? :lolwut:


It's English yes.

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Sanctimonious
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(Original post by GnomeMage)
Is it english?
No. Its the BC version of Cantonese.
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simplylldxo
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(Original post by karmacrunch)
Seriously? :lolwut:


Old English....

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You didn't listen in English at school then. You poor soul.
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karmacrunch
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(Original post by simplylldxo)
You didn't listen in English at school then. You poor soul.
I'm in Year 9. :rolleyes:... Going to Year 10. What is it then?

Both mean 'you' :confused:
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RayApparently
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It is very archaic English. In his time it would be considered normal.

It is also worth noting that Shakespeare himself coined many phrases and created many words that are still in use today. Surely the sign of a man far ahead in his time, who wondered of things that could not be yet expressed.
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Old_Simon
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All Shakespeare plays are on the net in "translated" form lol. Google them up to see plain English.
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Comus
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(Original post by GnomeMage)
Is it english?
It is English, its not modern English as we would use it today but nor is it Old English - Shakespeare wrote in early modern English, so you can more or less understand it if you pay attention (Old English looks more like one of the Nordic languages).
Thou, thee and thine are second person pronouns which were eventually superseded by 'you' and, in some dialects - such as Hiberno-English - 'ye'.
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Caedus
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Shakespeare wrote in Middle English, not Old English. Many of the words he did use are, however, quite obsolete.
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Comus
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(Original post by Caedus)
Shakespeare wrote in Middle English, not Old English. Many of the words he did use are, however, quite obsolete.
Perhaps veering a little off topic, but I'm fairly certain that Shakespeare was born nearly one hundred years after the middle English period ended?
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simplylldxo
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(Original post by karmacrunch)
I'm in Year 9. :rolleyes:... Going to Year 10. What is it then?

Both mean 'you' :confused:
It's the language they used back when Shakespeare wrote the plays...
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King Max
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(Original post by GnomeMage)
Is it english?
Yes. Old english þū (pronounced thoo) changed to you because people started changing the þ sound into y, which is why we have ye olde pub which would have been þe olde pubso thou and thee are simply in between þū and you where it was pronounced thou.
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karmacrunch
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(Original post by simplylldxo)
It's the language they used back when Shakespeare wrote the plays...
What is/was it called?
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King Max
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(Original post by karmacrunch)
What's it called?
Middle English.
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King Max
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Indo European ---> Proto-Germanic ---> Old Germanic ---> Anglo-Frisian ---> Old English ---> Middle English ---> Modern English
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Caedus
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There's a huge authorship battle going on at the moment and I'm not convinced that Shakespeare actually wrote any of his work, there's very little evidence to prove that Shakespeare was educated to he degree required to write his sonnets, and there's a lot of conjecture surrounding his travels. Even the Stratfordians no longer believe he visited Italy despite writing 106 scenes set in Italy, 800 general references to Italy, 400 references to Rome, 52 to Venice, 34 to Naples, 25 to Milan, 23 to Florence, 22 to Padova, 20 to Verona, 9 to Mantua along with numerous smaller towns and settlements. Under close scrutiny, not a great deal of Shakespeare's life actually adds up. I honestly think Shakespeare was a nom de plume.
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karmacrunch
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(Original post by King Max)
Middle English.
Thanks. Also, what's the difference between Old English and Middle English?
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Caedus
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(Original post by Comus)
Perhaps veering a little off topic, but I'm fairly certain that Shakespeare was born nearly one hundred years after the middle English period ended?
Quite right. It's Early Modern English.
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zippity.doodah
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because he was a hipster, of course
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