Are medical students segregrated from people doing other degrees? Watch

ja1
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May sound weird, but this is one of my main worries about a possible medical degree. Thought I'd post my queries here as most people reading will have been through/are in med school.

So basically I'm worried that medicine students will be almost segregated from people doing more 'normal' degrees. Now while I'm of course prepared and committed to work harder and longer for a medical career, especially for the first couple of years I kind of hope there still is time for socialising, going out and enjoying student life, outside of the 'medical bubble' I'm kind of picturing.

However as medical students have more work, possibly more lectures/tutoring time, and also start lectures earlier in the year, surely they never really mix with people doing other degrees? Hell I've even checked Cardiff and Queen Mary's websites (there are probably more) and people doing health degrees there live totally off main campus where majority of students and amenities are. I have spoken to a couple of students, one was at Durham and the other at one of the London unis, and they both found that people doing medicine (and engineering) degrees were separated from other students.

I also spoke to someone doing a medicine degree from Cambridge however and she said she found no such separation - however with their collegiate system maybe that is expected.

Does it change for each uni? The unis I am considering right now are Liverpool, Newcastle, Birmingham, Leicester, Keele, Edinburgh, Manchester, H&Y and Nottingham.

Also on a similar note, was there even time to socialise and get out and enjoy yourself in the first couple of years?

Would love to hear your views, thanks


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Asklepios
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(Original post by ja1)
May sound weird, but this is one of my main worries about a possible medical degree. Thought I'd post my queries here as most people reading will have been through/are in med school.

So basically I'm worried that medicine students will be almost segregated from people doing more 'normal' degrees. Now while I'm of course prepared and committed to work harder and longer for a medical career, especially for the first couple of years I kind of hope there still is time for socialising, going out and enjoying student life, outside of the 'medical bubble' I'm kind of picturing.

However as medical students have more work, possibly more lectures/tutoring time, and also start lectures earlier in the year, surely they never really mix with people doing other degrees? Hell I've even checked Cardiff and Queen Mary's websites (there are probably more) and people doing health degrees there live totally off main campus where majority of students and amenities are. I have spoken to a couple of students, one was at Durham and the other at one of the London unis, and they both found that people doing medicine (and engineering) degrees were separated from other students.

I also spoke to someone doing a medicine degree from Cambridge however and she said she found no such separation - however with their collegiate system maybe that is expected.

Does it change for each uni? The unis I am considering right now are Liverpool, Newcastle, Birmingham, Leicester, Keele, Edinburgh, Manchester, H&Y and Nottingham.

Also on a similar note, was there even time to socialise and get out and enjoy yourself in the first couple of years?

Would love to hear your views, thanks


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It depends on the university. Here at Edinburgh, for preclinical years we are very much part of the university as a whole. Same term dates, same area for lectures, same halls of residence for first year Etc. For clinicals though, term dates are different and all the time is spent in hospitals.

I've just finished first year and I have quite a few non-medic friends


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Democracy
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(Original post by ja1)
May sound weird, but this is one of my main worries about a possible medical degree. Thought I'd post my queries here as most people reading will have been through/are in med school.
We share a campus with some of the life sciences students during pre-clin, but our building is separate to theirs. I've never spoken to a life sciences student here despite (at least in name) sharing the same campus as them.

During the clinical phase of the course we're sent out on placements in hospitals all over the place so we're not even on campus very much.

We follow a different academic calendar too. I'm a clinical student and we start again in a few days then it's two weeks off for Christmas, two weeks off next summer and that's it. No Easter, no reading week, etc. It feels more like a job than a degree most of the time (though without the added benefit of a salary ).

Things like academic calendar, campus etc vary from uni to uni and some unis are more mixed, others less, but ultimately medicine is a pretty segregated degree. No matter how you square it, our degree can be up to six years long but a normal undergrad degree is half that - even if you make friends with all the non-medics in your hall in first year, in two years time they'll be graduating and leaving whereas you'll still have several more years to go. Segregation just kinda happens naturally.

Med school timetables are demanding and there are a lot more contact hours than other degrees so its not always easy to join non-med school societies etc which meet during hours when we have placements or lectures.

That said, there's certainly enough time and opportunity to socialise and go out, though probably not to the same level as some students studying other degrees.
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Helenia
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I was at Cambridge and, like your friend, didn't really feel there was a split, certainly for the first three years. I think that this is mostly because you live and predominantly socialise in your college rather than within your subject group. Once you get into clinical years most of your undergraduate friends leave and college life is less close-knit for those remaining, so medics do tend to stick together more.

At other universities I think it varies more. It is possible to be friends with non-medics but I think you have to do it through halls and/or societies. Some universities seem to have a bit of an "anti-medic" vibe in the general student population, not entirely sure why.
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Alice_95
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I'm not a medic although a number of my friends are.

I can concur with much written here in that in pre-clinical years you can socialise like all other students and you don't have to remain in a medical bubble. It does depend on the structure of your chosen university as to which other disciplines you will mix with, but given the time you will have there may be societies you choose to join which expands your social pool, as it were. It's quite different as a nursing student as we are clinical throughout and go into placement frequently throughout the years. Saying that, I've had a pretty good social life and have friends from many different courses. I hope this helps!
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nexttime
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I was at Oxford which was collegiate again but I must say; there does seem to be a lot of segregation at other universities. Medics even have their own separate sports teams!

I'd draw a distinction between being segregated and it being fun though - i think most medics would agree that there very much is time to be social and have a good time alongside the course, especially in the early years.
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shiggydiggy
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I don't think I would have even had a single conversation with a non-medic student during my entire degree had I have not gone out of my own way to join non-medic societies.

That said, now that I'm a clinical student, I'm almost never on campus and when I am, it's seperate to the university anyway.
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tnetennba
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Medical students party the hardest.

The reason most of them don't integrate is because they tend to consider themselves superior to other students. I have never met a male medical student without finding out he studies Medicine within ~40 seconds

edit: please can people stop quoting this. I really don't care. It's well known that Medicine & Law students commonly name-drop their subject to pull on nights out
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shiggydiggy
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(Original post by tnetennba)
The reason most of them don't integrate is because they tend to consider themselves superior to other students.
Please.
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Nottie
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In Nottingham, medics have their own fresher week, societies and building that is separated by a road fr the rest of the campus (although there is a passage). However, halls are mixed and you get the opportunity to socialise with other degrees as well.
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nexttime
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(Original post by tnetennba)
Medical students party the hardest.

The reason most of them don't integrate is because they tend to consider themselves superior to other students. I have never met a male medical student without finding out he studies Medicine within ~40 seconds
That's probably because all the medical students who didn't mention it to you... didn't mention it to you.

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But no seriously, some of the levels of segregation is pretty staggering and I can see how it causes tension. I think i'd be crazy if I'd spent my time with medics all day every day throughout med school
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Helenia
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My sister (non-medic) was at QMUL and there was a lot of general resentment towards the Bart's medics - not least probably because of their (perfectly reasonable, IMO) determination to keep their name. I've heard similar stuff about medics from friends at some other unis, which baffled me as there was nothing like that at Cambridge, beyond a bit of banter with the NatScis about us not being "real" scientists.

Forgot to answer the other point in the OP - yes, there is time to socialise and have fun!
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junior.doctor
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I was a Fresher at Birmingham >10 years ago, but seeing as no-one's commented on Birmingham yet, then for what it's worth: Birmingham medical school is right on the edge of the main university campus. Unfortunately the student union building is right on the other side of campus, at the other extreme, which means it takes about 15-20 mins to walk there, so if you have a free hour, it's not worth the walk. But there are other more central places to meet up with non-medics. The SU counts the medical school as a 'satellite campus' even though it's at the far end of the main campus. You could easily do everything with medics at Birmingham - medic sports, socialise with medics at the medical school cafe, the medics have their separate library within the medical school. However, if you want to make the effort, I found it easy enough to mix with non medics in the first couple of years. I joined a couple of main uni societies that met at the SU, and we also had Wednesday afternoon off like the rest of the uni, which meant that we could do uni sport if we wanted to. During Freshers week, there were loads of medsoc events, and it would have been very easy to have done all medsoc, but again I made the effort to do some hall stuff, and some uni stuff as well. My experience back then was that whilst you had to be proactive in mixing with non-medics, it was perfectly possible and there was no bad feeling against medics.
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em.d_4
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It'll depend where you go if you go to QMUL where the med school is barts and I think theres sseparate halls.I can see segregation may occur. Or at Durham where medics are on a campus miles from everyone else and have separate colleges again 100%.
But if you're somewhere like QUB or Leicester where halls are all mixed and med school is near most other things then it's only segregated if you choose to be.

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Le Nombre
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(Original post by em.d_4)
It'll depend where you go if you go to QMUL where the med school is barts and I think theres sseparate halls.I can see segregation may occur. Or at Durham where medics are on a campus miles from everyone else and have separate colleges again 100%.
But if you're somewhere like QUB or Leicester where halls are all mixed and med school is near most other things then it's only segregated if you choose to be.

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My sister's a Leicester medic, and it's more that you have to choose to integrate, not vice versa.

They have a separate Freshers, a week before anyone else gets there, and in real Freshers they are in lectures all day. They are encouraged to join LUSUMA societies instead of uni ones, to go to Med socials instead of halls etc. She lives with 1 medic and 6 non-medics, but the vast majority of her medic mates live and socialise with just medics.
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ab192
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(Original post by ja1)
\

Does it change for each uni? The unis I am considering right now are Liverpool, Newcastle, Birmingham, Leicester, Keele, Edinburgh, Manchester, H&Y and Nottingham.

Also on a similar note, was there even time to socialise and get out and enjoy yourself in the first couple of years?

Would love to hear your views, thanks


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Hi,
I go to HYMS and you're not segregated from the rest of the uni (either campus) as you will live on the campus with non-medics and have plenty of opportunity to join societies/ go to non-medic events.
Having said that the majority of people choose to stick with other medics- although there are a good number of people who spend most of their time with non-medics, these are generally people who join non-medic societies and sports teams. So it is totally up to you whether you want to mix outside of the medic bubble or not.
Is there any reason you specifically want to mix with non-medics anyway?
HYMS is a pretty small school but there are still a good range of personalities and people with different hobbies/ interests and plenty of it's own societies and sports teams. So you can still have a pretty active social life even if you choose to 'segregate' yourself from the rest of the uni.
What I've noticed from people on other courses is that they stick to people who they live with or people on their course anyway, so people will always have their own little 'bubble,' it's totally up to the person if they want to expand their bubble.
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Doomlar
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(Original post by tnetennba)
Medical students party the hardest.

The reason most of them don't integrate is because they tend to consider themselves superior to other students. I have never met a male medical student without finding out he studies Medicine within ~40 seconds

But what if one of your opening questions is "What are you studying?" :O
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06shawm
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(Original post by Doomlar)
But what if one of your opening questions is "What are you studying?" :O
I hate getting asked this question. :nooo:
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Doomlar
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(Original post by 06shawm)
I hate getting asked this question. :nooo:
I imagine I would too But you have to admit it's one of the first questions that will be in most peoples heads, especially at freshers, etc.
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shiggydiggy
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(Original post by 06shawm)
I hate getting asked this question. :nooo:
Why?
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