Alexithymia
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I've researched into ethernet cables but I'm still a bit confused as to what they are. I know it's used to connect to the internet but would it strengthen the connectivity? I would appreciate it if someone could please explain to me what it is and if they would recommend I should get one for uni. I have a Macbook Pro.
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Alex347_
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(Original post by cassicles)
I've researched into ethernet cables but I'm still a bit confused as to what they are. I know it's used to connect to the internet but would it strengthen the connectivity? I would appreciate it if someone could please explain to me what it is and if they would recommend I should get one for uni. I have a Macbook Pro.
It is a cable that goes straight from the router (or network adapter) into your computer. Typically, you would expect greater speeds, if you're in an area where Wifi signal is poor. For example, my room is an extension, and subsequently it fails to pick up wifi signals from the router downstairs.

However, if the wifi signal in a room is already strong and uninhibited, I doubt you'll recognise a huge difference- maybe it'd feel faster, but it would be luxury speed rather than a necessity. Now, an important detail is that you have a Macbook, as it happens I got the most recent 15" Macbook Pro just two weeks ago. Where my iPad, iPod and my old iMac struggled to establish wifi connectivity, my Macbook connects uninhibited wonderfully. That's something to consider.

Another thing to consider is, all Macbook Pro's with Retina Display require a Thunderbolt to Ethernet adapted, which costs £29. I rushed to purchase this, and don't even need to use it.

So my message is, make sure you test what the Wifi signal is like in your accommodation, before you rush and purchase this adapter, or indeed search like a madman through your box of tangled up cables, for the ethernet adapter.
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by cassicles)
I've researched into ethernet cables but I'm still a bit confused as to what they are. I know it's used to connect to the internet but would it strengthen the connectivity? I would appreciate it if someone could please explain to me what it is and if they would recommend I should get one for uni. I have a Macbook Pro.
Basically, it means that the data is transmitted through a wire rather than though a wireless network, think of it like a keyboard or a mouse
Ethernet is like a wired mouse, Wifi is like a wireless mouse, it's a simple as that.
the ethernet will almost certainly be faster (although the wifi will probably still be more than fast enough) and should also be much more reliable, in that as long as there is internet, unless the port or wire is broken (or the device being connected) you WILL have access, whereas wifi relies on there being a signal.

I expect that you will be provided with one anyway. Really, it's a matter of two things:
1) Is there wifi?
IF no: you will probably want ethernet; if yes:
2) Do you need the extra speed and reliability?
If yes, use the ethernet; if no, only use the ethernet when the wifi isn't working.

EDIT: I was unaware that you needed an adapter for MBPr (although really it's not at all surprising given it's Apple), so I would say just don't bother with the ethernet at all if there is wifi, nothing should be urgent enough to need the extra speed
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Alexithymia
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(Original post by Alex347_)
It is a cable that goes straight from the router (or network adapter) into your computer. Typically, you would expect greater speeds, if you're in an area where Wifi signal is poor. For example, my room is an extension, and subsequently it fails to pick up wifi signals from the router downstairs.

However, if the wifi signal in a room is already strong and uninhibited, I doubt you'll recognise a huge difference- maybe it'd feel faster, but it would be luxury speed rather than a necessity. Now, an important detail is that you have a Macbook, as it happens I got the most recent 15" Macbook Pro just two weeks ago. Where my iPad, iPod and my old iMac struggled to establish wifi connectivity, my Macbook connects uninhibited wonderfully. That's something to consider.

Another thing to consider is, all Macbook Pro's with Retina Display require a Thunderbolt to Ethernet adapted, which costs £29. I rushed to purchase this, and don't even need to use it.

So my message is, make sure you test what the Wifi signal is like in your accommodation, before you rush and purchase this adapter, or indeed search like a madman through your box of tangled up cables, for the ethernet adapter.
Brilliant reply, just what I was looking for! I probably should get to my accommodation before already assuming I'll need an ethernet cable.

(Original post by Jammy Duel)
Basically, it means that the data is transmitted through a wire rather than though a wireless network, think of it like a keyboard or a mouse
Ethernet is like a wired mouse, Wifi is like a wireless mouse, it's a simple as that.
the ethernet will almost certainly be faster (although the wifi will probably still be more than fast enough) and should also be much more reliable, in that as long as there is internet, unless the port or wire is broken (or the device being connected) you WILL have access, whereas wifi relies on there being a signal.

I expect that you will be provided with one anyway. Really, it's a matter of two things:
1) Is there wifi?
IF no: you will probably want ethernet; if yes:
2) Do you need the extra speed and reliability?
If yes, use the ethernet; if no, only use the ethernet when the wifi isn't working.
Thank you for your reply, I'll make sure to test the wifi once I'm at my halls then see if I really need to invest in an ethernet cable.
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ihavemooedtoday
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
EDIT: I was unaware that you needed an adapter for MBPr (although really it's not at all surprising given it's Apple), so I would say just don't bother with the ethernet at all if there is wifi, nothing should be urgent enough to need the extra speed
Many thinner Windows laptops also don't have an ethernet port. If you haven't seen a 2013/2014 MBP... they are incredibly thin. The laptop is thinner than the height of a RJ45 connector, so there is no way they could have included one without making the laptop substantially thicker just for it.

The base of the laptop is only about 1mm thicker than a USB port.

(Original post by cassicles)
Thank you for your reply, I'll make sure to test the wifi once I'm at my halls then see if I really need to invest in an ethernet cable.
By the way, you can also use a USB 3.0 to ethernet cable, but then it would tie up a USB 3.0 port (unless you have a hub), so it's probably better to go with Thunderbolt-to-Ethernet. You can often find USB 3.0 adapters cheaper, though.
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