Poll : What do you think is the best Engineering degree?

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Poll: What is the best overall Engineering degree?
Aeronautical/Aerospace Engineering (7)
23.33%
Chemical Engineering (6)
20%
Civil Engineering (3)
10%
Electrical Engineering (4)
13.33%
Mechanical Engineering (6)
20%
Petroleum/Oil&Gas Engineering (1)
3.33%
Other (please specify) (3)
10%
JonTheMathGuy
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#1
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#1
From the options given, please vote the field of engineering, which you deem best overall, considering :


  1. Employment & Salary
  2. Flexibility of job and promotions
  3. Respect by others for the degree
  4. Variety of jobs (e.g. being able to enter other professional fields e.g. Finance or other engineering fields)


And if you could possibly rank the fields, in your view, from 1. being the best, to 6. being the worst of the rest.

Thank you all
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tarmaclover
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#2
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#2
(Original post by JonTheMathGuy)
From the options given, please vote the field of engineering, which you deem best overall, considering :


  1. Employment & Salary
  2. Flexibility of job and promotions
  3. Respect by others for the degree
  4. Variety of jobs (e.g. being able to enter other professional fields e.g. Finance or other engineering fields)


And if you could possibly rank the fields, in your view, from 1. being the best, to 5. being the worst of the rest.

Thank you all
Water wheel engineering should be added.


RIP Arkwright
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JonTheMathGuy
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#3
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#3
(Original post by tarmaclover)
Water wheel engineering should be added.


RIP Arkwright
That is not an engineering degree you can get from UK universities.
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shahbaz
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#4
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#4
Other, Physicist.
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JonTheMathGuy
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#5
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#5
(Original post by shahbaz)
Other, Physicist.
Physics is not really engineering in applied form
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shahbaz
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#6
(Original post by JonTheMathGuy)
Physics is not really engineering in applied form
Its okay, we all which ones better .
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Summit
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#7
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#7
Materials, great starting salary and HUGE flexibility!
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Martina_
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#8
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#8
Chemical.
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Armin.
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#9
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#9
Is this a trick question? Engineering is a **** degree.
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SNOOP LAYAN
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Armin.)
Is this a trick question? Engineering is a **** degree.
LOL What makes you say that?
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Darkwarrior23
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#11
The one that fixes boilers,had one come over the other day... top lad
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JonTheMathGuy
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#12
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#12
anyone else
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username1398367
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#13
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#13
EE is the easiest
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interstitial
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#14
(Original post by dire wolf)
EE is the easiest
u wot m8

Posted from TSR Mobile
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superduper9
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#15
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#15
This is a hard question.

Civil, mechanical and aeronautical are very similar. Yes, the end application is different, but the the bulk of the basic physics, mechanics and maths you learn are identical for these three subjects. It is just that the context in which you learn it is different.

It is debatable whether these three fields, and indeed electrical engineering, will be able to thrive (or even survive) in the absence of energy. With fossil fuels depleting, and the focus turning to other energy sources, I am inclined to say that Chemical Engineering will have the most prospects for development, jobs etc.
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TurboCretin
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#16
(Original post by superduper9)
This is a hard question.

Civil, mechanical and aeronautical are very similar. Yes, the end application is different, but the the bulk of the basic physics, mechanics and maths you learn are identical for these three subjects. It is just that the context in which you learn it is different.

It is debatable whether these three fields, and indeed electrical engineering, will be able to thrive (or even survive) in the absence of energy. With fossil fuels depleting, and the focus turning to other energy sources, I am inclined to say that Chemical Engineering will have the most prospects for development, jobs etc.
You think that mechanical engineers will die out?

Okay then.
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superduper9
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#17
(Original post by TurboCretin)
You think that mechanical engineers will die out?

Okay then.
No I didn't say that.

I said of the engineering fields, chemical will likely have the most opportunities.

The other point was that the other fields are somewhat dependent on chemical.

PS. I'm a civil engineer, so I'm not exactly bragging about my own field!
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TurboCretin
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#18
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#18
(Original post by superduper9)
No I didn't say that.

I said of the engineering fields, chemical will likely have the most opportunities.

The other point was that the other fields are somewhat dependent on chemical.
You said it's debatable whether the other fields will survive, in the absence of energy (fossil fuels??). Perhaps I misunderstood what you were saying, but that sounded like you thought mechanical engineering might cease to exist.

I can understand saying that about aeronautical engineering to an extent, given how dependent planes are currently on fossil fuels. That said, the need to find alternatives for powering planes arguably makes aeronautical engineers rather important for the future...
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username1398367
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#19
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#19
(Original post by Arithmeticae)
u wot m8

Posted from TSR Mobile
cause of its unintuitive nature, degrees in EE tend to be very plug-and-chug'y
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superduper9
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#20
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#20
(Original post by TurboCretin)
You said it's debatable whether the other fields will survive, in the absence of energy (fossil fuels??). Perhaps I misunderstood what you were saying, but that sounded like you thought mechanical engineering might cease to exist.

I can understand saying that about aeronautical engineering to an extent, given how dependent planes are currently on fossil fuels. That said, the need to find alternatives for powering planes arguably makes aeronautical engineers rather important for the future...
Well yes, in the absence of energy, how can we work mechanical equipment like vehicles, TVs, fridges, heating etc. These things are primarily designed by mechanical engineers, which is why I said that it's a field that may not survive of we didn't have energy/electricity. But same goes for civil too - how can we construct things without power?

Finding alternative means of energy is not really down to aeronautical engineers - primarily it lies with chemists, chemical engineers, some physicists and those who specialised in the study of renewable energy sources.
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