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    I want this to be informative as possible which is why it'll be in great detail and hopefully people will get a true view of what the subject and A - levels are like.

    A - levels are brutal - that's the first thing. I'm not a student who got AAA nor a student who applied to Russell Group universities. I guess you could say I'm the 'average Joe at the bus stop' (if such a thing exists). Unlike other people who say GCSE's were easy... I found GCSE's hard. In fact every exam I've took was hard if it was easy surely everyone would get As? A - levels require hard work however this doesn't mean you'll get a C. In fact revising is simply for your own conscious when it comes to A - levels. I know people say 'if you don't get the grade you're doing something wrong'... My take is... People aren't machines. People try hard and it doesn't get them the grade they want, then what?

    A - levels are hard and unbearable. I've seen a lot of people on here saying they revised and got AAA. Everyone I know who does my subjects revised yet they didn't get AAA and neither did I. The truth is... Working hard means you tried and that's all you can ever do. The reason I'm saying that is because I'm a bit tired of people saying how hard work pays off and how working hard means a good grade - it doesn't.

    Work hard in your A - levels and have no regrets - that's my advice. I revised a lot and didn't get AAA and people I know revised a lot and did everything they could. Whilst on here it may seem 'normal' for people to get AAA in 'real life'... I know very few people who even got As.

    A - levels require a good memory. Once you have that you can know apply what you know to the questions ect. Most people can't get past the first stage... The problem most people have is remembering the information, if you can't do that then you can't apply what you know to the question... Memory plays a big role in A - levels and exams in general.

    Slightly off track but here's my take on the subjects...

    Geography (WJEC)

    A memory test. The exam questions are simply horrible. I revised for my exam and got a U, yet in the resit exam which I barely revised for I got an A. How is this possible? This subject is simply memorising loads and loads of information. That's all it is. Even if you do remember everything the questions are just... Tbh, this is the one subject I would avoid. There are MAJOR timing issues with this exam and the amount you have to write is more so than any other exam. This subject is a complete joke imo.

    Psychology (OCR)

    This subject isn't what you'd expect from Psychology. The problem is in the first year the exams are spilt 30% and 70%... The weight of the second exam is a lot and it can make or break you like that. Trust me I would know. This subject is so easy that's hard. You get studies and you have to learn the aim, sample, procedure, results and some evaluation issues. The sample could be something like 75 males from Devon, middle class, aged between 30 and 60. What's hard about that? Nothing really. The subject in it self isn't actually that difficult in comparison to other subjects.

    When the teacher explains something... You might not understand it but afterwards you probably will. The issue with this subject is the amount of detail and the amount you have to learn - that's what makes it hard. You have 15 studies in the first year and over 50 in the second year... Say you put 74 as your answer you don't get the mark. You have to be precise. Now when you've got A LOT of numbers, locations and information you have to remember you are bound to make mistakes.

    I'd say any student could do this subject. For example a Maths student could do this subject because what you're learning is not exactly Psychology. It's simply aim, sample, procedure, results and evaluation issues. That's it throughout AS and A2 (there's also two other things as well - perspectives and approaches). It's boring and tedious. You'll simply be remembering information then writing it down... In terms of the approaches and perspectives. Take an approach (social approach)... Your teacher will give you set answers for the social approach. For example what it's about, studies that use that approach, strengths and weaknesses, in the exam you will simply write that information down.

    This subject is boring in a sense of you always know what's coming. It's always going to be aim, sample, procedure, results and evaluation issues. The procedures are usually long and detailed as are the results...

    I'd say this subject requires memory more than anything.

    Economics (OCR)

    I'd say this subject requires memory but it also requires an interest in Economics. This subject is interesting and the work is difficult at times. The issue with this subject is the exam questions... The questions can be extremely difficult at times and it's frustrating when you revise so much. Also, in one of the exams you learn 3 topics in a lot of depth however in the exams you'll get asked very few questions on the 3 topics and 1 topic will barely even get mentioned. It's a case of hit and miss really... But I guess it's the same with any subject.

    Overall, I'd say this is a okay subject. It is difficult but it's far better than Geography and it does require more application than Psychology meaning you have to rely less on your memory... However, it still has A LOT of information to memorise.

    Philosophy (AQA)

    An interesting subject... This is a subject which is truly interesting. However, I wouldn't recommend it. This is an EXTREMELY hard subject. People struggle to get a C in this subject. The work is very difficult more so than any other subject. Understanding what you've been taught is an uphill battle. I really struggled with this subject and so did everyone in my class. Everyone enjoyed it but everyone found it hard to grasp the concepts. Then you get the exam questions... Unlike other subjects it's hit or miss. In AS you get 4 questions, say you don't understand one question you can't move on. The 4 questions you get are the questions you have. If you don't understand then it's simply of a case of 'you have to understand otherwise you're going to fail'. The paper is worth 90 marks and two of them questions are worth 30 marks. If you don't understand the 30 mark question then...?

    The second year is better because you get a choice however the work is still hard. Plus, you have to read a Philosophy book which is in old English and simply impossible to understand. The subject is simply so hard that it's not worth the small amount of fascination you get from it.

    So this is my experience and other people may disagree with what I said... A lot of what I said it from the teachers I had and the college I went to. If anyone has any questions feel free to ask...

    I hope this was helpful to anyone who read it.
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    (Original post by >Username<)
    Psychology (OCR)

    This subject isn't what you'd expect from Psychology. The problem is in the first year the exams are spilt 30% and 70%... The weight of the second exam is a lot and it can make or break you like that. Trust me I would know. This subject is so easy that's hard. You get studies and you have to learn the aim, sample, procedure, results and some evaluation issues. The sample could be something like 75 males from Devon, middle class, aged between 30 and 60. What's hard about that? Nothing really. The subject in it self isn't actually that difficult in comparison to other subjects.

    When the teacher explains something... You might not understand it but afterwards you probably will. The issue with this subject is the amount of detail and the amount you have to learn - that's what makes it hard. You have 15 studies in the first year and over 50 in the second year... Say you put 74 as your answer you don't get the mark. You have to be precise. Now when you've got A LOT of numbers, locations and information you have to remember you are bound to make mistakes.

    I'd say any student could do this subject. For example a Maths student could do this subject because what you're learning is not exactly Psychology. It's simply aim, sample, procedure, results and evaluation issues. That's it throughout AS and A2 (there's also two other things as well - perspectives and approaches). It's boring and tedious. You'll simply be remembering information then writing it down... In terms of the approaches and perspectives. Take an approach (social approach)... Your teacher will give you set answers for the social approach. For example what it's about, studies that use that approach, strengths and weaknesses, in the exam you will simply write that information down.

    This subject is boring in a sense of you always know what's coming. It's always going to be aim, sample, procedure, results and evaluation issues. The procedures are usually long and detailed as are the results...

    I'd say this subject requires memory more than anything.
    Hey,
    I finished doing my AS levels this year and one of the subjects I did was also psychology for which I got an A. However, I completely agree with what you've said about psychology! It's so frustrating, it annoys me how you barely actually learn any actual psychology, but rather there is more emphasis placed on learning minor details such as the sample sizes, place in which the study took place, exact percentages etc. Honestly this is such a big flaw and would put anyone off the subject. For me when I chose psychology I was so excited about learning more about human behaviour and other disciplines but I was so disappointed. It's unfair as it's a wrong portrayal of what psychology actually is. Psychology is such an interesting subject and human behaviour is a fascinating phenomenon. The A level syllabus is a joke and a complete memory test. I don't know about OCR but for AQA for AS we had to learn literally around 100 studies (not an exaggeration) when in the exam the most you'll use are about 10. For revision I literally had around 60 odd flash cards and learnt them all off by heart.
 
 
 

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