Confounded
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Hey!
The brain fascinates me, I mean think about it. It controls all our biological functions and also our consciousness. It is the ultimate multitasker and we know more about Space than we know about whats going on inside our own heads.
So I want to study neuroscience but I want to specialize in clinical neuroscience and become a neurologist. So i was wondering if getting a bachelors in neuroscience will help me in gaining graduate entry to a medical program. Also would a bachelors in neuroscience benefit some one who wants to become a neurologist.

Can some one please explain to me the route through which one specializes in neurology. I read somewhere it takes 16 years (absurd)!! But that's not true...riiight?
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lilixxx1000
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You would have to study medicine as a neurologist is a doctor. So you would have to go to medical school which is 5 or 6 years, then you work as a junior doctor for 2 years, and then you specialise into neurology which probably takes between 5 and 8 years (I'm not sure exactly you could contact the Royal College of Physicians). But remember during your specialist training you would be a neurologist, you just wouldn't be a consultant yet. Alternatively you could do a neuroscience bachelors and then graduate entry medicine (GEM) but this would take even longer (7 years at uni total) and GEM is incredibly competitive, even more so than undergrad medicine, not to mention much more expensive.
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Confounded
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(Original post by lilixxx1000)
You would have to study medicine as a neurologist is a doctor. So you would have to go to medical school which is 5 or 6 years, then you work as a junior doctor for 2 years, and then you specialise into neurology which probably takes between 5 and 8 years (I'm not sure exactly you could contact the Royal College of Physicians). But remember during your specialist training you would be a neurologist, you just wouldn't be a consultant yet. Alternatively you could do a neuroscience bachelors and then graduate entry medicine (GEM) but this would take even longer (7 years at uni total) and GEM is incredibly competitive, even more so than undergrad medicine, not to mention much more expensive.
What about a masters in clinical neuroscience. I know that UCL has a program that allows students who have an honors in Neuroscience...
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lilixxx1000
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(Original post by Confounded)
What about a masters in clinical neuroscience. I know that UCL has a program that allows students who have an honors in Neuroscience...
I'm not sure - I don't really know anything about that. You shuold email UCL and ask!
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Confounded
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ok. I just emailed kings....are you a neuroscience student yourself? or perhaps medical?
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Confounded
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(Original post by lilixxx1000)
I'm not sure - I don't really know anything about that. You shuold email UCL and ask!
ok. I just emailed kings....are you a neuroscience student yourself? or perhaps medical?
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Confounded
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btw can neuroscience be classified as a health care subject?


(Original post by lilixxx1000)
You would have to study medicine as a neurologist is a doctor. So you would have to go to medical school which is 5 or 6 years, then you work as a junior doctor for 2 years, and then you specialise into neurology which probably takes between 5 and 8 years (I'm not sure exactly you could contact the Royal College of Physicians). But remember during your specialist training you would be a neurologist, you just wouldn't be a consultant yet. Alternatively you could do a neuroscience bachelors and then graduate entry medicine (GEM) but this would take even longer (7 years at uni total) and GEM is incredibly competitive, even more so than undergrad medicine, not to mention much more expensive.
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lilixxx1000
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(Original post by Confounded)
ok. I just emailed kings....are you a neuroscience student yourself? or perhaps medical?
Ok. No but I'm applying for medicine this year
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lilixxx1000
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(Original post by Confounded)
btw can neuroscience be classified as a health care subject?
I'm sorry I don't know! I wouldn't think so though but don't quote me on that.
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Confounded
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(Original post by lilixxx1000)
Ok. No but I'm applying for medicine this year
I was going to apply for med too, to do neurology eventually. But my final year didnt go so well and I missed all my grades. It kinda sucks cos I went from 4A* prediction to utter hopeless. But unis are gonna look at my final performence and from what I heard it doesn't matter how amazing i was in the previous years. Man 1 mistake can destroy everything....so this is me picking myself up and looking for alternative routes to do what I want.

Thanks any way and good luck!
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lilixxx1000
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(Original post by Confounded)
I was going to apply for med too, to do neurology eventually. But my final year didnt go so well and I missed all my grades. It kinda sucks cos I went from 4A* prediction to utter hopeless. But unis are gonna look at my final performence and from what I heard it doesn't matter how amazing i was in the previous years. Man 1 mistake can destroy everything....so this is me picking myself up and looking for alternative routes to do what I want.

Thanks any way and good luck!
Oh dear I'm sorry to hear that Thanks and good luck to you too !
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nexttime
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(Original post by lilixxx1000)
You would have to study medicine as a neurologist is a doctor. So you would have to go to medical school which is 5 or 6 years, then you work as a junior doctor for 2 years, and then you specialise into neurology which probably takes between 5 and 8 years (I'm not sure exactly you could contact the Royal College of Physicians). But remember during your specialist training you would be a neurologist, you just wouldn't be a consultant yet. Alternatively you could do a neuroscience bachelors and then graduate entry medicine (GEM) but this would take even longer (7 years at uni total) and GEM is incredibly competitive, even more so than undergrad medicine, not to mention much more expensive.
Actually, you'd have to go through Core Medical Training (or medical ACCS) for two years first. Then its neurology for 4. So, assuming no years out, successful completion of exams and remaining full time for the entire period, its 9-10 years before being a trainee neurologist, then 4 more until consultant.

And then that might all change with the Shape of Training Review planning to make doctors all generalists again.
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lilixxx1000
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(Original post by nexttime)
Actually, you'd have to go through Core Medical Training (or medical ACCS) for two years first. Then its neurology for 4. So, assuming no years out, successful completion of exams and remaining full time for the entire period, its 9-10 years before being a trainee neurologist, then 4 more until consultant.

And then that might all change with the Shape of Training Review planning to make doctors all generalists again.
Thanks for the clarification I wasn't sure on the specifics of specialist neurology training
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hellodave5
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I just did a degree in psychology, and I am about to start a MSc in clinical and cognitive neuroscience.
Would like to work in a hospital personally, rather than only do research etc. I'm not sure I can do it with a PhD in neuroscience, but I may look at a DClinPsy to be a clinical neuropsychologist.
I was contemplating being a medical doctor to specialise in neuroscience (through possible graduate entry scheme after my masters degree), but it is rather expensive and a long route (I would be gaining another undergraduate degree).
Let me know if I can help with anything
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Confounded
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(Original post by hellodave5)
I just did a degree in psychology, and I am about to start a MSc in clinical and cognitive neuroscience.
Would like to work in a hospital personally, rather than only do research etc. I'm not sure I can do it with a PhD in neuroscience, but I may look at a DClinPsy to be a clinical neuropsychologist.
I was contemplating being a medical doctor to specialise in neuroscience (through possible graduate entry scheme after my masters degree), but it is rather expensive and a long route (I would be gaining another undergraduate degree).
Let me know if I can help with anything
(Original post by nexttime)
Actually, you'd have to go through Core Medical Training (or medical ACCS) for two years first. Then its neurology for 4. So, assuming no years out, successful completion of exams and remaining full time for the entire period, its 9-10 years before being a trainee neurologist, then 4 more until consultant.

And then that might all change with the Shape of Training Review planning to make doctors all generalists again.

Would it be any different if i was studying in the US?
Anyway I am also working on my personal statement, i only have the first draft, can anyone recommend a good reliable site, or person that can help with my PS?
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hellodave5
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(Original post by Confounded)
Would it be any different if i was studying in the US?
Anyway I am also working on my personal statement, i only have the first draft, can anyone recommend a good reliable site, or person that can help with my PS?
I dunno but I don't think there is a huge amount of difference in the medical and neuroscience fields certification between US and UK.

What is the personal statement for?
I would be happy to read over it. My summer holidays still, so I have too much time on my hands.
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