Should I go to university if I am feeling like this?

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Anonymous #1
#1
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#1
Have anxiety and depression
Low self-esteem
Not social
Sometimes completely lose interest in everything

Other reasons also...
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tealites
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#2
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then, probably not.

You might want to consider taking a gap year, just try to seek help with what you're struggling with, and then consider university next year..
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coldhell
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Have anxiety and depression
Low self-esteem
Not social
Sometimes completely lose interest in everything

Other reasons also...
It would be really difficult. Imagine being in a university with a depression! Your grades will suffer and you would not fully experience the university life. Like the other user has said, take a gap year and talk to a doctor or someone regarding your depression.
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gr8wizard10
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Yeah, you should develop as a person.
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A future Midwife
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Yes you should go! You can't let these things stop you or hold you back! You'd regret it if that was your reason for not going!
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doodle_333
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it could give you lots of opportunity to get involved and move on, or it could be too much and cause you to deteriorate and be miserable

there isn't really any way to tell
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LauraB101
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The reason for your depression may be due to the people you're around and environment you're in at the moment. Moving away to uni and making new friends could be the best thing for you!
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Libbybaloo
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I suffered from Depression, anxiety and I had a really bad social life. Going to Uni was the best decision I've ever made, however it's not for everyone I guess. Personally if you feel too insecure, take a gap year and get some help to fight those niggles then when you're ready, take the plunge. You won't be alone. My second advice is when you do get to uni, sign for societies and sports, have socials with your flatmates and course mates, put yourself out there, that way you can tackle the bad social life head on.

But just to be sure, take a gap year and talk to someone to deal with the depression and anxiety first.
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CallMeBatwoman
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From what I understand via my own social groups a lot of people are having similar problems at the moment in some respects. With such a long summer it's easy to get stuck in an unoccupied loop and just do nothing, which then makes it easy for having any interests to seem like a lot of effort. Also with everyone moving away social groups are breaking apart and you do probably feel pretty unstable with your life atm (I know I do!) I'd advise university might well be very good for you in terms of applying yourself and becoming active socially again, just make a really conscious effort to be social! Don't sit in your room avoiding everyone. Plus as someone else pointed out you'll regret not going and having to go through the stress of applying again, plus a gap year means finding an entire year to fill!

Also quick question: Was the anxiety and depression present before summer holidays? Or did it develop more recently?
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Per
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I have terrible anxiety but I'm at uni and have been for the past couple of years. It's difficult but it's possible. You should ask yourself what you want and if you aren't certain you want to go to uni now you should take a gap year to work or explore your interests and maybe seek help for your problems. Good luck!

also, I will add that although it's been difficult, since I moved over 200 miles from home to my uni, it's been the best couple of years of my life so far. Sometimes you need to take a leap and have a bit of faith in yourself and hope that you can have a bright future. Everyone is different though, just make sure you know what you want for yourself
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Pomum96
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#11
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Have anxiety and depression
Low self-esteem
Not social
Sometimes completely lose interest in everything

Other reasons also...
Similar situation here. I am currently taking a year out. Just trying to learn to enjoy myself again and also trying to pluck up the courage to speak to my GP. It's entirely up to you (moving out can feel like a fresh start and might be the kick you need, but may cause excessive stress and prevent you from taking the time you need to feel like yourself again).
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LaughingKitsune
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I developed severe anxiety and moderate depression while I was at uni, to the point where, by the end of the first term, I was missing around 3/4 of my lectures and my seminars. I ended up leaving anyway, but the aftermath (accommodation issues) made it much worse.

I'd probably suggest taking a gap year, if you think that you can't handle uni right now. It's not for everyone.
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Old_Simon
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It is amazing how common various forms of anxiety are. It is a hidden epidemic of ill health.
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Kabloomybuzz
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Personally, I didn't because it wasn't the right time for me and I knew I wouldn't get as much out of the experience as I could. I ended up taking 3 years out, working and getting some "real world" experience and independence while still living with my parents, I travelled a lot, and took a lot of opportunities.

I'm not saying you wouldn't get those with uni, but being out of the education system for a bit can do some people the world of good. Doing all your education in on 16/17 year chunk is not for everyone. The freedom and independence I got from taking those 3 years out did wonder for my confidence, enabled me to deal with and sort out most of my issues,, it meant I was more able to see the bigger picture, and when i started uni I was all the better for it. I also learned a lot about myself and ended up doing a slightly different course than I originally applied for, and was able to make the decision not to go into halls but into a small student house because I knew better what was right for me and what would suit me.

If you're doubting your ability or readiness for uni now, then you can always deferr your place a year, spend a year out focusing on yourself, self experience and learning to be more independent etc, and you'll be able to start university fresh, after a good break from education
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Arkarian
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I managed to pass last year and I've got all of those plus a few extras like schizo/aspies/ADD/bipolar/OCPD(split personalities) plus physical pains like curvature of the spine. I'm now doing a second year.

Your disabilities are only obstacles you create for yourself. Yes life is bad, but it can get worse but is more likely to get better there is only so low you can go before it's impossible to have anything bad happen to you, look at the bright side you have a home and family who support you and you could get extra time for stuff based upon some of the things you may have.
now time for my favourite "quoteto combat depression that never works"

The world won't stop while you ask questions, so while you think about the past the world moves to the future.

Basically, even if everything is bad there is always a tomorrow and you can't stop that so just get used to it and soon you will find out who you are truly.
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Mr. Nice Guy
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I think it would depend on how severe your depression and anxiety is. How well is it managed? What symptoms do you have?

If it was less bad, and you engage with the university, you may enjoy university and your depression may improve. Your self-esteem may improve if you went to societies and met people, for example.

Of course, you need to be able to cope with the demands of the course. Talk to your trusted family and friends, they know you better than I do. You could also talk to your doctor, but doctors tend to be biased towards encouraging people to do stuff.
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0907714
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I disagree with a lot of these posts telling you to basically "put your mind to it and you can achieve anything".

If you have these problems and have not yet seen a GP about them, please do so. They will assess you and begin treatment. It is important to find a GP you click with and don't feel like you are intimidated be them (which can be hard with social problems I know, but for me out of seven GPs there is one/two who I prefer to use).

Your health is the most important thing next to family (imo). You might think throwing yourself into a situation that forces you to act might develop you as a person. I have a few things I want to tell you from my experience on this.

I have been to university twice and dropped out in the second semester of first year because I exhausted dealing with depression on top of university life. I thought throwing myself to see if I could "swim" instead of sink might work. I also moved into accommodation with 11 others and it was awful. I reclused into my room and only ate when everyone else was out the kitchen. I just didn't want to talk to anyone because I was dealing with so much and would probably just burst and have an emotional breakdown lol.

If you already have reservations about going to uni, and that doesnt mean you can never go, then I think it would be best as I said to seek help just like you have sought help from this forum.

The fact that you have made the first step of admitting you have some problems is a huge step. Don't ignore them, deal with them now and you will have a better time at uni in the future.
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Katy100
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#18
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If your illnesses are very severe then you should take a gap year and seek treatment. If they are less severe then you might cope with getting treatment whilst studying.
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BlueSheep32
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It depends on whether you feel like you could cope with studying whilst suffering from mental illness. Most universities have a really good support system for those with mental health problems, and you can access services like counselling a lot more easily than you could on the NHS. If you get a proper diagnosis and let the uni know about any mental health issues you have, they can do a lot to help you, like being more sympathetic if you ask for an extension on a piece of work, or giving you extra time in exams, which can both really help to ease the pressure - even if you don't use them, it helps to know they're an option for you.

I was mildly depressed in 6th form and my issues got worse at uni - I developed really bad anxiety that just kept getting worse - but I think that probably would have happened to me regardless of where I was. I reached my lowest point in 2nd year at exam time, when I felt like I was having a breakdown, and it affected my marks. Thankfully I was having counselling and not long after exams ended things started to improve for me. It's been long and difficult, but a year later and I finally feel like I can control my anxiety & depression and although it'll take a lot of hard work I can still get a first in my degree. I don't think I would have been able to find the courage to face up to my issues if I'd stayed at home as it would have been harder for me to access the kind of help and support that I did get at uni.

I (somehow) managed to stick with my degree whilst I was feeling at my worst and turn myself around and get better, but not everyone is able to do that. There's no shame in dropping out because you don't feel like you can cope. I had a friend who dropped out in January of first year due to depression triggered by a bad break-up and his mum being seriously ill; he took a year out, came back and dropped out again as he realised that uni wasn't for him. At the end of the day, your health is a priority and if going to university makes that worse then it would be worth dropping out to try and get better and give it a better shot later on. I would say give it a try now though as the change might be what you need, and if you feel like you're struggling too much, then drop out - you can always try again later.
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Anonymous #2
#20
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Have anxiety and depression
Low self-esteem
Not social
Sometimes completely lose interest in everything

Other reasons also...
I am exactly the same minus depression. Going in September to University. Anxiety/Stress has caused illness i have PACs/PVCs daily every 3rd to 4th heartbeat. Its scary i cannot do anything slightly stressful now without feeling ill. Pair that with bowel problems too.
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