Applying to oxford with anorexia....

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PhysGeek
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#1
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#1
Will they point blank refuse you or will they still consider you.

I'm currently in recovery but I'm still underweight and suffering. I'm applying to oxford, and was wondering if it was worth it or if I'll get rejected?? Xx


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Planckton
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#2
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#2
They're technically not allowed to discriminate against you for causes of disability (which mental illness falls into). There's a thing on UCAS where you can declare it, but not everyone does.
Oxford's mental health policy states that applications are considered purely on an academic basis, and disability declarations are only used to provide additional support (eg at interview)
I've had various mental issues and I'm gonna declare it on UCAS but not put it in reference cause it didn't affect my grades
Hope you're doing okay x
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ΘTheta
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#3
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#3
You won't get rejected because that is discrimination, if the decision was based on you anorexia. =)
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PhysGeek
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#4
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Thanks for the replies. That's really helpful.

But my dad was talking to one of the admissions tutors and apparently he said that they wouldn't consider your application if they found out (I don't know if he's just trying to scare me into recovery though).

And thanks- I'm getting better it's just hard. Xxxx


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Planckton
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#5
(Original post by PhysGeek)
Thanks for the replies. That's really helpful.

But my dad was talking to one of the admissions tutors and apparently he said that they wouldn't consider your application if they found out (I don't know if he's just trying to scare me into recovery though).

And thanks- I'm getting better it's just hard. Xxxx


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Yeah don't worry, they're not allowed to do that!
I get you, keep taking it one day at a time :hugs:
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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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#6
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#6
They'd still consider you, don't worry. I'd like to suggest, though, that moving to a different city/environment whilst still in recovery (I'm presuming you don't already live in Central Oxford?) - and a high-pressure environment at that - might not necessarily be the best thing for your mental state.

In short, don't worry about them discriminating against you... but do think over it carefully and discuss it with your care team :yes:
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fluteflute
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#7
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(Original post by PhysGeek)
he said that they wouldn't consider your application if they found out
That's definitely not true
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PhysGeek
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#8
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(Original post by fluteflute)
That's definitely not true
But don't some universities point blank refuse you unless you've been recovered for 2 years?? Xx


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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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(Original post by PhysGeek)
But don't some universities point blank refuse you unless you've been recovered for 2 years?? Xx


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I've never heard of such a thing (I suffer from mental health problems too) :nah:
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fluteflute
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#10
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(Original post by PhysGeek)
But don't some universities point blank refuse you unless you've been recovered for 2 years?? Xx
No that's definitely not the case (at least in the UK)

Oxford aim to be as supportive as possible

Send them an email if you want to hear it from the University directly:

[email protected] or [email protected]
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nexttime
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#11
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A scarily high proportion of Oxford have eating disorders. Its a disease of highly strung perfectionists and that's what Oxford's full of! You'll be far from alone don't worry.
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Nathanielle
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#12
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#12
(Original post by PhysGeek)
Thanks for the replies. That's really helpful.

But my dad was talking to one of the admissions tutors and apparently he said that they wouldn't consider your application if they found out (I don't know if he's just trying to scare me into recovery though).

And thanks- I'm getting better it's just hard. Xxxx


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What can allways that someone is preferred over you, because he shows more overall ability than you to perform on the course. So a disability won't prevent you from people making assumptions about you. It is the same with underage applicants, they may be advised to apply to colleges, who are better suited to their needs. Having a wheelchair you would probably not aim for a college, who has many barriers.

But you are not not getting a place simply because of it. Simply means, that university can e.g. say, you are not safe there and that they would prefer you would defer/take a year out. Taking every student, regardless of their ability to cope with the course, would be irresponsible. You would not advise somebody to start university in the middle of recovery of chemo therapy and as anorexia can get very dangerous, unrecovered you are allways in danger to have to interrupt your study/education.

Thus as Lonely Gothard I would wait for full recovery, instead of launching you in a competitive environment which can nourish your illness. Starting later and then be able to concentrate on the course and participate in every activity, instead struggling your way through the degree and might getting out being worse, is definitely not worth it. University is not easy and sometimes it is better to attack something slower in order to be able to excell at something. (Nota bene: This advise is not restricted to Oxford.)
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Nathanielle
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#13
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#13
(Original post by PhysGeek)
But don't some universities point blank refuse you unless you've been recovered for 2 years?? Xx
Maybe for courses, where you have to work with food and/or have to be physically able to do certain things. E.g. theoretically a severe dyslexic could do any course, but how to get through clinic without being able read comments of colleagues regarding a patient? In that case a disability can be a danger to others.
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nexttime
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(Original post by Nathanielle)
Maybe for courses, where you have to work with food and/or have to be physically able to do certain things. E.g. theoretically a severe dyslexic could do any course, but how to get through clinic without being able read comments of colleagues regarding a patient? In that case a disability can be a danger to others.
Its less like that than you might think though. What you say is true - being a doctor involves lots of fast reading and writing. Yet medical schools don't ask for a medical history as part of admissions and they do allow extra time for dyslexics in both admissions tests and medical school exams. Discrimination based on disability really isn't acceptable, even when that disability is relevant: in thevast majority of cases there will be a way around it, or duties can be altered to suit needs.
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Nathanielle
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#15
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(Original post by nexttime)
Its less like that than you might think though. What you say is true - being a doctor involves lots of fast reading and writing. Yet medical schools don't ask for a medical history as part of admissions and they do allow extra time for dyslexics in both admissions tests and medical school exams. Discrimination based on disability really isn't acceptable, even when that disability is relevant: in thevast majority of cases there will be a way around it, or duties can be altered to suit needs.
Yeah, that is why I made examples in which cases it is possible to deny it. And I spoke about severe dyslexics and as sad as it be, being e.g. psychotic will not work either in clinical training. (I am not talking about studying medicine, but about studying medicine and being able to work as a doctor at the same time. And that is again a different issue and some medical schools say that openly, that it can come to problems, when you are asked to actually work, because then you won't get extra time.)
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username1042689
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#16
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#16
Mental health problems are scarily common, especially in very intelligent people, and so Oxford logically wouldn't discriminate against people with mental health issues - not that they'd be allowed to anyway. If you think the pressure of Oxford won't affect your recovery, then apply.
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