Correct way of punctuating a relative clause?!? Watch

Highfiveyou
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1)The attorney, who is responsible in decision making, must be given time and space.

Will this relative clause with commas emphasise that I'm only referring to a particular attorney rather than hundreds of attorneys?

2)the attorney who is responsible in decision making must be given time and space.

So, in this sentence I have not used any commas and therefore "who is responsible in decision making" is the particular attorney from many attorneys I am referring to who needs time and space, and so this information is essential in the meaning that is why I have not set it off with commas.

Im so confused about restricted and non restrictive clauses because they are so similar and the rules look pretty much the same.

Help anyone?
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Highfiveyou
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Help someone I know : "that" is used for a restricted clause. Sometimes which/who is also used as a restricted clause and I can't get my head around what needs commas and what does not.... Help me
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merqoperatic
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(Original post by Highfiveyou)
1)The attorney, who is responsible in decision making, must be given time and space.

Will this relative clause with commas emphasise that I'm only referring to a particular attorney rather than hundreds of attorneys?

2)the attorney who is responsible in decision making must be given time and space.

So, in this sentence I have not used any commas and therefore "who is responsible in decision making" is the particular attorney from many attorneys I am referring to who needs time and space, and so this information is essential in the meaning that is why I have not set it off with commas.

Im so confused about restricted and non restrictive clauses because they are so similar and the rules look pretty much the same.

Help anyone?
"Responsible for decision-making" is more idiomatic, but that's an aside

The commas would shift the context a little bit. "The attorney, who is responsible for decision-making, must be given time and space" suggests that you're talking about the attorney separately from the decision-making; i.e. you could remove the clause and it wouldn't confuse what you were trying to say: "The attorney must be given time and space."

The second version, without the commas, makes the "who is responsible..." clause an actual piece of identifying information. You're talking about this particular lawyer, and not the 50 others who work at her firm. To rewrite it to show how this works, you could say "Of all of the lawyers working at Satan & Co. PLLC, City of Dis, Hell, CB2 1TQ, the attorney responsible for decision-making must be given time and space."

Does that make sense?
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Highfiveyou
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(Original post by merqoperatic)
"Responsible for decision-making" is more idiomatic, but that's an aside

The commas would shift the context a little bit. "The attorney, who is responsible for decision-making, must be given time and space" suggests that you're talking about the attorney separately from the decision-making; i.e. you could remove the clause and it wouldn't confuse what you were trying to say: "The attorney must be given time and space."

The second version, without the commas, makes the "who is responsible..." clause an actual piece of identifying information. You're talking about this particular lawyer, and not the 50 others who work at her firm. To rewrite it to show how this works, you could say "Of all of the lawyers working at Satan & Co. PLLC, City of Dis, Hell, CB2 1TQ, the attorney responsible for decision-making must be given time and space."

Does that make sense?
Yes, that makes sense I just get confused at times. Thanks!
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Highfiveyou
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(Original post by merqoperatic)
"Responsible for decision-making" is more idiomatic, but that's an aside

The commas would shift the context a little bit. "The attorney, who is responsible for decision-making, must be given time and space" suggests that you're talking about the attorney separately from the decision-making; i.e. you could remove the clause and it wouldn't confuse what you were trying to say: "The attorney must be given time and space."

The second version, without the commas, makes the "who is responsible..." clause an actual piece of identifying information. You're talking about this particular lawyer, and not the 50 others who work at her firm. To rewrite it to show how this works, you could say "Of all of the lawyers working at Satan & Co. PLLC, City of Dis, Hell, CB2 1TQ, the attorney responsible for decision-making must be given time and space."

Does that make sense?
How about this:

1)The secretary may have to carry out every task fast and efficiently, and may also make a list of all the goods in the stock room, which may be an advantage to the business's overall performance.

2) The secretary may have to carry out every task fast and efficiently, and may also make a list of all the goods in the stock room which may be an advantage to the business's overall performance.

When the relative clause comes at the end....?

So if I add a comma before the phrase "which" then it is telling the readers that this statement holds no importance to the overall message, and that I am only referring to one business and this does not need to be identified...(Is that correct)

If I removed the commas before "which", then would that be giving the reader a message that this is vital information...or I'm talking about one particular business from many others , and therefore I am identifying what kind of business...?
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Highfiveyou
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Anyone??
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