Is medicine in Spain taught in english? Watch

queensboy
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Is medicine in Spain taught in english?
If it isn't, do Spanish doctors know technical medical terms only in the Spanish language?

How would a Spanish and British doctor communicate then?
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queensboy
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McMicheal
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(Original post by queensboy)
Is medicine in Spain taught in english?
If it isn't, do Spanish doctors know technical medical terms only in the Spanish language?

How would a Spanish and British doctor communicate then?
I think it's definitely taught in Spanish in Spain.

One of them would have to learn the other language.

I also think doctors learn some Latin everywhere. Therefore they understand what pills are what even if reading labels in country with language they don't speak, given that labels are in Latin alphabet.
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queensboy
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(Original post by McMicheal)
I think it's definitely taught in Spanish in Spain.

One of them would have to learn the other language.

I also think doctors learn some Latin everywhere. Therefore they understand what pills are what even if reading labels in country with language they don't speak, given that labels are in Latin alphabet.
So they wouldn't have heard of words such as "ventricles", "cell wall", "cytoplasm' etc but their spanish translations?
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McMicheal
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(Original post by queensboy)
So they wouldn't have heard of words such as "ventricles", "cell wall", "cytoplasm' etc but their spanish translations?
Cytoplasm is actually Cytoplasma in Latin & Spanish. So they would understand that.

There's many terms, words that have Latin roots or names, so doctors would understand them. Not everything, but a lot.
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queensboy
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e aí rapaz
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Most doctors in other countries have a good grasp of English anyway.

Firstly, they're typically well off and well educated so they often have a good foundation in English.

Secondly, although they study their course in their native language, they read a lot of papers and research etc coming out of the US, so they're knowledge of English is likely to be high.
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Helenia
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Most medicine courses in Spain will be taught in Spanish. There may be one or two places running English-speaking courses for commercial gain, but they are not the majority.

If an English doctor wanted to speak to a Spanish doctor, they would usually use an interpreter. Some Spanish doctors may speak English and vice versa, but it's not taught routinely. Some technical terms may be very similar as they have Latin roots, so they might understand a few of each other's words, but an interpreter would be used for most purposes.
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Pectorac
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(Original post by queensboy)
Is medicine in Spain taught in english?
If it isn't, do Spanish doctors know technical medical terms only in the Spanish language?

How would a Spanish and British doctor communicate then?
Every hospital in the UK has a whole translation team for the vast majority of languages, and they will find a translator for a certain language if they don't have one with them. This is due to there being so many patients who don't speak English, as well as times where doctors and other medical professionals need to communicate with their non-English speaking counterparts.
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Helenia
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(Original post by Pectorac)
Every hospital in the UK has a whole translation team for the vast majority of languages, and they will find a translator for a certain language if they don't have one with them. This is due to there being so many patients who don't speak English, as well as times where doctors and other medical professionals need to communicate with their non-English speaking counterparts.
You are right that an interpreter would be used, but I don't know of any hospitals which have in-house interpreting teams (though they may have a database of bilingual staff, it's not their primary job). Everywhere I has worked so far has used commercial interpreting companies, either face-to-face or by telephone.
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queensboy
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e aí rapaz
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OP why are you still bumping this thread? Your question has been answered already. Maybe if you elaborated on what you want to know, you'd get more and better responses.
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queensboy
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(Original post by e aí rapaz)
OP why are you still bumping this thread? Your question has been answered already. Maybe if you elaborated on what you want to know, you'd get more and better responses.

If it isn't, do Spanish doctors know technical medical terms only in the Spanish language?
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queensboy
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Helenia
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(Original post by queensboy)
If it isn't, do Spanish doctors know technical medical terms only in the Spanish language?
I answered this! :rolleyes:

They are only taught technical terms in their own language. They may be able to work out the equivalents in an English piece of text/speech because they have the same Latin/Greek roots, but they are not routinely taught them in any other language, just as doctors in the UK are not taught them in Spanish/French/any other language you want to think about.
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queensboy
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(Original post by Helenia)
I answered this! :rolleyes:

They are only taught technical terms in their own language. They may be able to work out the equivalents in an English piece of text/speech because they have the same Latin/Greek roots, but they are not routinely taught them in any other language, just as doctors in the UK are not taught them in Spanish/French/any other language you want to think about.
Thank you my little angel.
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