ChoccyPhilly
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I've got some very in depth questions about how we perceive music. Part of the EPQ marking system demands that I give as many sources as possible to gain higher marks and I believe that referencing someone knowledgeable would be very useful. Do any of you guys know any helpful contacts to email a couple of questions to, in hopes of a productive reply or reply at all? Anyone knowledgeable about the science of music or avant-garde music would be much obliged.

Proposed question(s)
How exactly do the hair cells in the cochlea perceive different vibrations to create unique timbres?

Evolutionary advantages of preferring familiar timbres than others?

Reward centre system when listening to sound/music we perceive as "pleasurable"

How we condition ourselves to get sick of a certain trait in music (such as the predictable pop structures)

Why active, open-minded listeners want to constantly explore for new sounds/how their reward centres in particular work.
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
I've got some very in depth questions about how we perceive music. Part of the EPQ marking system demands that I give as many sources as possible to gain higher marks and I believe that referencing someone knowledgeable would be very useful. Do any of you guys know any helpful contacts to email a couple of questions to, in hopes of a productive reply or reply at all? Anyone knowledgeable about the science of music or avant-garde music would be much obliged.

Proposed question(s)
How exactly do the hair cells in the cochlea perceive different vibrations to create unique timbres?

Evolutionary advantages of preferring familiar timbres than others?

Reward centre system when listening to sound/music we perceive as "pleasurable"

How we condition ourselves to get sick of a certain trait in music (such as the predictable pop structures)

Why active, open-minded listeners want to constantly explore for new sounds/how their reward centres in particular work.
Heya, I'm going to put this in the Biology forum for you as you should get more responses there.

You should also check out the forum to see if there's any other threads there which might be helpful to you! http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=129
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Revenged
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(Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
I've got some very in depth questions about how we perceive music. Part of the EPQ marking system demands that I give as many sources as possible to gain higher marks and I believe that referencing someone knowledgeable would be very useful. Do any of you guys know any helpful contacts to email a couple of questions to, in hopes of a productive reply or reply at all? Anyone knowledgeable about the science of music or avant-garde music would be much obliged.

Proposed question(s)
How exactly do the hair cells in the cochlea perceive different vibrations to create unique timbres?

Evolutionary advantages of preferring familiar timbres than others?

Reward centre system when listening to sound/music we perceive as "pleasurable"

How we condition ourselves to get sick of a certain trait in music (such as the predictable pop structures)

Why active, open-minded listeners want to constantly explore for new sounds/how their reward centres in particular work.
It is a complex subject so I would try to be strict on yourself and not get lost.

First of all, you need to separate sensation and perception. It is actually a branch of psychology, called cognitive psychology, where they consider the 'brain' as though it was a computer that functions.

'Sensation' refers to how a sense (e.g. a sound) is processed into raw information. Like 'input'. For example, it is how you get from vibrations in the air to activation of the cranial nerve carrying the information to the brain.

'Perception' refers to how this input is processed in the brain. Initially the information is processed at the auditory centre which is present in the temporal lobe. the temporal lobe is vital for language, communication - this is why conditions that cause deficits in this (e.g. Alzheimer's disease) have profound language problems, primarily receptive dysphasia).

conditioning, is again psychology, is the basic way we learn. learning to liking music is a type of classical conditioning.

classical conditioning this is where a stimulus (e.g. listening to music) causes an uncontrolled response (activation of pleasure pathway), which means you learn to like (or hate) it, it is like Pavlov's dogs. conditioning is the most basic form of memory - where you learn to like or dislike and this goes into your memory stores.

[the other type of conditioning - e.g. operant conditioning - is when a stimulus (e.g. throwing a stick for a dog) through positive reinforcement (treat) leads to a behaviour change (learning that picking up the stick is good as you get a treat). basis of learning.]

'Pleasure pathway' is really involved in release of dopamine. The major pathways for dopamine are mesolimbic (midbrain -> basal ganglia), and mesocortical (midbrain -> cortex). dopamine has very important role in additions. dopamine activation is involved in perceptual disorder (e.g. schizophrenia where people hear voices talking to them (third person auditory hallucinations) and delusional beliefs (fixed, firm, false beliefs, especially persecutory) and anti-psychotics that treat these perceptual symptoms actually work by blocking dopamine showing the importance of dopamine within perception as well as in pleasure.

try to get a good grasp of the science my friend, it is a complex topic covering physiological, psychological and neurology.
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ChoccyPhilly
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(Original post by Revenged)
It is a complex subject so I would try to be strict on yourself and not get lost.

First of all, you need to separate sensation and perception. It is actually a branch of psychology, called cognitive psychology, where they consider the 'brain' as though it was a computer that functions.

'Sensation' refers to how a sense (e.g. a sound) is processed into raw information. Like 'input'. For example, it is how you get from vibrations in the air to activation of the cranial nerve carrying the information to the brain.

'Perception' refers to how this input is processed in the brain. Initially the information is processed at the auditory centre which is present in the temporal lobe. the temporal lobe is vital for language, communication - this is why conditions that cause deficits in this (e.g. Alzheimer's disease) have profound language problems, primarily receptive dysphasia).

conditioning, is again psychology, is the basic way we learn. learning to liking music is a type of classical conditioning.

classical conditioning this is where a stimulus (e.g. listening to music) causes an uncontrolled response (activation of pleasure pathway), which means you learn to like (or hate) it, it is like Pavlov's dogs. conditioning is the most basic form of memory - where you learn to like or dislike and this goes into your memory stores.

[the other type of conditioning - e.g. operant conditioning - is when a stimulus (e.g. throwing a stick for a dog) through positive reinforcement (treat) leads to a behaviour change (learning that picking up the stick is good as you get a treat). basis of learning.]

'Pleasure pathway' is really involved in release of dopamine. The major pathways for dopamine are mesolimbic (midbrain -> basal ganglia), and mesocortical (midbrain -> cortex). dopamine has very important role in additions. dopamine activation is involved in perceptual disorder (e.g. schizophrenia where people hear voices talking to them (third person auditory hallucinations) and delusional beliefs (fixed, firm, false beliefs, especially persecutory) and anti-psychotics that treat these perceptual symptoms actually work by blocking dopamine showing the importance of dopamine within perception as well as in pleasure.

try to get a good grasp of the science my friend, it is a complex topic covering physiological, psychological and neurology.
Not to worry, I've actually covered most of that. I don't even need to refer to most of it in such depth, it's more an overview and the information i seek is more related the last paragraph you wrote, as well as some theories about perception with different genres. Thanks anyway
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