Boyfriend's Personal Statement for Biomedical Science/Biochemistry

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LouieSax
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Hey Guys
Sorry for posting so many threads lately but I have a lot of questions and until my new job starts, I have quite a bit of time on my hands.
Anyway this question is for my boyfriend who doesn't have a student room account. Sorry for the long post.

My boyfriend is applying for biomedical Science or Biochemistry and I want to ask a few question on his accord. He eventually wants to go into medicine as a post grad.

- On his personal statement should he talk about his eventual plans to go into medicine? He has relevant work experience, employment and voluntary work which he wants to include, should he do this or should he focus on biomedical science and pretend that biomedical science is what he wants to go into in the future?

- What sorts of things should he include on his personal statement to make a good application? He has plenty of things to include on a medicine personal statement but not much for a biomedical/biochemistry personal statement, is there anything he could do to improve his PS?

- What is the best way to write a personal statement which applies to both biomedical science and biochemistry?

Thanks in advance
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SlowlorisIncognito
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Biomedical science courses can differ in what they look for- some are vocational, training people for specific jobs within the NHS, and some are purely academic degrees. Obviously, lots of people do get into biomedical science degrees using a medical personal statement, but if he's just applying for biomedicine and biochemistry, it would be better not to focus too much on medicine. He doesn't need to talk about his future plans in his PS, there's no need to lie, and people do change their minds over the course of a five year degree.

Ideally, for an academic PS, the majority of the personal statement (around 75%) should focus on his academic interest in the subject. This means discussing his Biology and Chemistry A-levels, as well as discussing what he has read around the subject. If he has one or two examples of work experience/volunteering that are more closely related to these subjects, then he should discuss these in depth. Discussing work experience that's not really relevant won't add much to his application, but could be mentioned in the extra curricular section.

It seems like at the moment he's planning to write a medicine personal statement when he's not actually applying for medicine, which, while it might get him offers, isn't really the best thing to do. Writing a proper biomedicine statement is far more likely to actually improve his application.
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LouieSax
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(Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)
Biomedical science courses can differ in what they look for- some are vocational, training people for specific jobs within the NHS, and some are purely academic degrees. Obviously, lots of people do get into biomedical science degrees using a medical personal statement, but if he's just applying for biomedicine and biochemistry, it would be better not to focus too much on medicine. He doesn't need to talk about his future plans in his PS, there's no need to lie, and people do change their minds over the course of a five year degree.

Ideally, for an academic PS, the majority of the personal statement (around 75%) should focus on his academic interest in the subject. This means discussing his Biology and Chemistry A-levels, as well as discussing what he has read around the subject. If he has one or two examples of work experience/volunteering that are more closely related to these subjects, then he should discuss these in depth. Discussing work experience that's not really relevant won't add much to his application, but could be mentioned in the extra curricular section.

It seems like at the moment he's planning to write a medicine personal statement when he's not actually applying for medicine, which, while it might get him offers, isn't really the best thing to do. Writing a proper biomedicine statement is far more likely to actually improve his application.
Right OK thank you so very much for the help. Out of interest, if my boyfriend was to write his personal statement based on biomedicine. Is it worth going into details about a summer university course he attended, which involved a lot of lab work and biochemistry, would this count as work experience for biomedicine? Additionally, is there any point for him to talk about his voluntary work, he volunteers with the Alzheimer's Society so maybe he could talk more about learning more about the disease through various training? How much should he talk about this? Additionally, is there any point in him talking about his medicine personal statement, he said he was going to try and swing it towards biomedicine somehow, would this be OK? He also mentioned that he would not write masses and masses about his work experience and voluntary but only a couple of lines. Would this also be OK. I really want him to do as well as possible in his personal statement and get a place onto his degree?
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SlowlorisIncognito
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(Original post by LouieSax)
Right OK thank you so very much for the help. Out of interest, if my boyfriend was to write his personal statement based on biomedicine. Is it worth going into details about a summer university course he attended, which involved a lot of lab work and biochemistry, would this count as work experience for biomedicine? Yes, however the focus would be different to a medicine personal statement. Instead of focusing on skills, he should talk about what he enjoyed and why the course made him interested in studying biomedicineAdditionally, is there any point for him to talk about his voluntary work, he volunteers with the Alzheimer's Society so maybe he could talk more about learning more about the disease through various training? How much should he talk about this? IMO this volunteering belongs in his extra curricular section and should only have a brief mention, unless he is struggling to find things to talk about. Additionally, is there any point in him talking about his medicine personal statement, he said he was going to try and swing it towards biomedicine somehow, would this be OK? Sorry, I'm not super clear on what you're asking here. However, he should focus mainly on biomedicine. He also mentioned that he would not write masses and masses about his work experience and voluntary but only a couple of lines. Would this also be OK. It's probable that if he mentions all his work experience and volunteering, he won't have enough room to discuss accademics, and why he wants to study the course. I really want him to do as well as possible in his personal statement and get a place onto his degree? I understand this feeling, but try not to get too wrapped up in something you can't ultimately influence or control that much. Try to remember a lot of people do get places on biomedicine when they've applied for 4 other medicine places, and have a PS tailored to medicine.
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LouieSax
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(Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)
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OK thank you so much, this is an absolute huge help. I will pass on your advice to him. Thank You
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