Starting Maths, Chemistry, Biology and Physics A levels Watch

Nerdypants98
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Hellooo! So, I've just completed my first full week in sixth form and am not quite sure of how to organise myself ;/ GCSEs were pretty simple, just do an adequate amount of work, and all will be fine: But it feels like I am getting so much work at one time. How do you guys advise I should start? Should I read the text books and make note, self teach ahead??

Thanks in advance
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VonDoom
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Wow you got 10A*s at GCSE?
I only got 2A*s 7As and a B.

Also I chose the exact same AS subjects as you, will change RS to Physics soon.
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Jelly150
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(Original post by VonDoom)
Wow you got 10A*s at GCSE?
I only got 2A*s 7As and a B.

Also I chose the exact same AS subjects as you, will change RS to Physics soon.
Lol. You didn't answer the question.


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sophiaaax
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The thing that helped me the most is, at the end of every topic, make a flash card or just bullet point all the key things you need to know. So, for example, in chemistry, when you finish your amount of substance topic, get a sheet of paper and write all your equations on. Its really good for consolidating work and they're good for references. Reading the textbook is really useful. Only read ahead if you're 100% comfortable with the stuff you've just covered and if you've got time.
For maths, do as much practise as possible! It's so important!
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VonDoom
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(Original post by Jelly150)
Lol. You didn't answer the question.


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Who gives one of I didn't answer the question?
Neither did you.
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Nerdypants98
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(Original post by VonDoom)
Wow you got 10A*s at GCSE?
I only got 2A*s 7As and a B.

Also I chose the exact same AS subjects as you, will change RS to Physics soon.
"Only"!? Those are still really great results! well done xD

And good luck with physics
:elefant:
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Nerdypants98
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(Original post by sophiaaax)
The thing that helped me the most is, at the end of every topic, make a flash card or just bullet point all the key things you need to know. So, for example, in chemistry, when you finish your amount of substance topic, get a sheet of paper and write all your equations on. Its really good for consolidating work and they're good for references. Reading the textbook is really useful. Only read ahead if you're 100% comfortable with the stuff you've just covered and if you've got time.
For maths, do as much practise as possible! It's so important!
Thanks so much, I think I'll start doing that!! And yeah, my school gave us a textbook for maths with loads of questions, so I guess I'll start those too xD
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VonDoom
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(Original post by Nerdypants98)
"Only"!? Those are still really great results! well done xD

And good luck with physics
:elefant:
Yeah only I was expecting 5A*s and 5As.

Anyway All sciences and maths is apparently really difficult.
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LeFailFish
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(Original post by Nerdypants98)
Hellooo! So, I've just completed my first full week in sixth form and am not quite sure of how to organise myself ;/ GCSEs were pretty simple, just do an adequate amount of work, and all will be fine: But it feels like I am getting so much work at one time. How do you guys advise I should start? Should I read the text books and make note, self teach ahead??

Thanks in advance
Hi! I took those subjects at AS and am continuing with all four to A2, so I'll try and help out a little.

Do your homework as soon as possible, because trust me, it builds up. A lot. You can end up overwhelmed if you're not careful, so do it early and put plenty of effort in - you'll thank yourself later! Try and start revision early as well - make preparatory revision notes whenever you finish a topic, and revisit it regularly so you don't have to teach it to yourself again when exams near.

There's no need to 'read ahead' and teach yourself things early, unless your teachers believe it would be helpful for completely new topics. Just ensure you make plenty of notes for whatever you're currently learning. Reading around the topic can also help if you're aiming for an A/A*.

Keeping organised is essential, so keep a folder per subject at home for class notes and revision. Have a travelling folder for school or the weight will quickly become too much (I learnt that the hard way). I like to colour-coordinate my revision for organisation purposes, but that doesn't mean you should. Whatever works for you. Also, group your notes in topics and label each one - it helps so much when you're revising, otherwise you can't find anything!

Most importantly, don't overload yourself. Take breaks, socialise, keep up with an extracurricular activity so you don't burn out. Revision is important, but there IS such a thing as too much!

Feel free to question me about any of the subjects (although we may not be on the same exam boards).
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Nerdypants98
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(Original post by LeFailFish)
Hi! I took those subjects at AS and am continuing with all four to A2, so I'll try and help out a little.

Do your homework as soon as possible, because trust me, it builds up. A lot. You can end up overwhelmed if you're not careful, so do it early and put plenty of effort in - you'll thank yourself later! Try and start revision early as well - make preparatory revision notes whenever you finish a topic, and revisit it regularly so you don't have to teach it to yourself again when exams near.

There's no need to 'read ahead' and teach yourself things early, unless your teachers believe it would be helpful for completely new topics. Just ensure you make plenty of notes for whatever you're currently learning. Reading around the topic can also help if you're aiming for an A/A*.

Keeping organised is essential, so keep a folder per subject at home for class notes and revision. Have a travelling folder for school or the weight will quickly become too much (I learnt that the hard way). I like to colour-coordinate my revision for organisation purposes, but that doesn't mean you should. Whatever works for you. Also, group your notes in topics and label each one - it helps so much when you're revising, otherwise you can't find anything!

Most importantly, don't overload yourself. Take breaks, socialise, keep up with an extracurricular activity so you don't burn out. Revision is important, but there IS such a thing as too much!

Feel free to question me about any of the subjects (although we may not be on the same exam boards).
I do AQA Biology and Physics, Edexcel Chemistry and Maths.

Also, I noticed that when i was revising for GCSE, past papers had some questions which are always recycled in one form or another, is that the same with A level?
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Nerdypants98
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(Original post by VonDoom)
Yeah only I was expecting 5A*s and 5As.

Anyway All sciences and maths is apparently really difficult.
Yes, I've heard that a lot but I guess that no a level subject will be easy so one might as well just do the subjects they enjoy and want to use as a future career path right?
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LeFailFish
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(Original post by Nerdypants98)
I do AQA Biology and Physics, Edexcel Chemistry and Maths.

Also, I noticed that when i was revising for GCSE, past papers had some questions which are always recycled in one form or another, is that the same with A level?
Well I'm on AQA for the sciences and Edexcel for Maths, so we're actually quite similar!

Yes, at A level some questions do seem to come up every year - although they're worded differently or may just be the same principles applied to a different scenario. However, there's a lot more content for A level than GCSE, so it's much more difficult to predict what will come up! You end up learning an awful lot that you're never examined on (but it's all interesting, so that doesn't matter as much).

As a random example, I just opened three Biology past papers that I did last year. I discovered a question on identifying an organelle, determining its function and discussing how its structure helps it carry out this function/ functions, on every single paper. The organelle was different each time, but the question style was the same and probably recycled.
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Trainz
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(Original post by Nerdypants98)
I do AQA Biology and Physics, Edexcel Chemistry and Maths.

Also, I noticed that when i was revising for GCSE, past papers had some questions which are always recycled in one form or another, is that the same with A level?
You do exactly the same exam boards as me.

Anyways, there are questions that get repeated, but this will apply more to biology than anything else. Some of the exams this year varied from past papers such as Unit 2 physics which was much heavier on math and did not have any repetition (if my memory isn't deceiving me) so you never know what they may do next year.
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Nerdypants98
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(Original post by LeFailFish)
Well I'm on AQA for the sciences and Edexcel for Maths, so we're actually quite similar!

Yes, at A level some questions do seem to come up every year - although they're worded differently or may just be the same principles applied to a different scenario. However, there's a lot more content for A level than GCSE, so it's much more difficult to predict what will come up! You end up learning an awful lot that you're never examined on (but it's all interesting, so that doesn't matter as much).

As a random example, I just opened three Biology past papers that I did last year. I discovered a question on identifying an organelle, determining its function and discussing how its structure helps it carry out this function/ functions, on every single paper. The organelle was different each time, but the question style was the same and probably recycled.
Thanks so much for the advice. Looking at the contents page for any of my books scares me :sad:
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Nerdypants98
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(Original post by Trainz)
You do exactly the same exam boards as me.

Anyways, there are questions that get repeated, but this will apply more to biology than anything else. Some of the exams this year varied from past papers such as Unit 2 physics which was much heavier on math and did not have any repetition (if my memory isn't deceiving me) so you never know what they may do next year.
Thanks , btw did you get assessed with the ISA or EMPA?
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Trainz
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(Original post by Nerdypants98)
Thanks , btw did you get assessed with the ISA or EMPA?
I believe it was an ISA for Chemistry and EMPA for Physics and Biology.
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LeFailFish
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(Original post by Nerdypants98)
Thanks so much for the advice. Looking at the contents page for any of my books scares me :sad:
It's difficult, and there's a lot to learn (especially for Biology), but sometimes I do think A levels are demonised a bit. If you work hard from the start then they're not quite as awful as some people make them out to be.
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DannyAspinall69
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Hello my fellow student roomians!

I was just tantalising the prospect of studying either of these fantabulous disciplines of the educational sectrum, when I had the most sudden and convulsivulating epiphany- and that was to not take them because i'm not a massive science ****** (y)
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Nerdypants98
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(Original post by DannyAspinall69)
Hello my fellow student roomians!

I was just tantalising the prospect of studying either of these fantabulous disciplines of the educational sectrum, when I had the most sudden and convulsivulating epiphany- and that was to not take them because i'm not a massive science ****** (y)

Wow, that was one of the most beautifully written criticisms I have ever experienced! I take it your studying English?

Science ****** :cool:
:clap2:
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Nerdypants98
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(Original post by LeFailFish)
It's difficult, and there's a lot to learn (especially for Biology), but sometimes I do think A levels are demonised a bit. If you work hard from the start then they're not quite as awful as some people make them out to be.
Thats a bit reassuring, because a huge amount of people make out that A levels are something impossible to get A/A* grades in, and tbh, that's where I want to be.
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