Dumbledore'sArmy
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
Hello all.


I'm doing AS (WJEC) Chemistry and (AQA) Biology.

For those who have obtained AA or A*A* at A level with the same exam boards, I am calling upon you. SPECIFICALLY YOU!

I have the WJEC Chemistry guide, written by WJEC themselves, specific to the board. I also (will have) the AQA Nelson thornes book.

If i literally revised the book completely and thoroughly, what grade would you expect someone to obtain at the end of the two AS levels. My teacher said i would get at most a 'B'..but I would like to know what you think.

Which other ways would I obtain an AA, at the end of this year? I know past papers are a key. Should i attempt past papers after I have revised the whole book, or unit?

NOTE: I don't have a problem with being organised.

Also, you know the Nelson Thornes book for AQA biology, is it worth it? My college recommended it, but i know some people that have gotten an A in biology with the Collins book designed for AQA. Which one is the best?

How did you get that AA? Simply by just revising the revision guides? What extra work did you do, that pushed you up to an AA?
0
reply
Nymthae
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
Not the same board, but they aren't usually too dissimilar. I did both OCR, so at least AQA isn't a million miles away, not seen a lot of WJEC material though.

a) being concise with your revision is the key to chemistry. Some areas will focus much more on understanding, so you need to make sure you understand. I suspect there's some organic chemistry at some stage - this is particularly important to understand, as you'll most likely be faced with slightly different molecules, so you need to know how to approach it logically. Any definitions are free marks so just learn them (flash cards are usually very effective for simple recall like that).

b) key words for biology. Past papers questions after topics are good, and mainly look very closely at the mark scheme - applicable to both subjects. There's a very key skill in being concise in your answers, but being clear and accurate. You need all the information they want, so one big give away as to how much you need to write is usually how many marks they award. Half a page of writing space doesn't mean you necessarily have to fill it, because you may begin to struggle with time.

c) in the exams, if you don't know... leave it and come back to it. Getting the marks you do know, and know confidently, is the best way to get going. It's not uncommon to get stressed when you turn over the paper and find it's something you don't really know. It's best just to leave it and approach it after everything else again, because otherwise you have the tendency to ramble on and miss the point entirely as you're panicking to get an answer.

There's no super secret to these things really. I pretty much just used a load of past papers where I could get them (as I was never big on reading notes, or rewriting, or making silly maps). That said, reaction maps can be useful for chemistry if you do do some organic group conversions.

Best way to see if you understand something? Try and explain it to someone else. People who know things well can correct you, but people who actually don't know ask the best questions because it drills down to the basic level. I think just trying to help out friends probably made me pay a bit more attention to the meaning behind what I was saying.

Edit: it's a lot about finding what works for you. An efficient hour of revision beats a useless three hour period.
0
reply
Dumbledore'sArmy
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#3
(Original post by Nymthae)
Not the same board, but they aren't usually too dissimilar. I did both OCR, so at least AQA isn't a million miles away, not seen a lot of WJEC material though.

a) being concise with your revision is the key to chemistry. Some areas will focus much more on understanding, so you need to make sure you understand. I suspect there's some organic chemistry at some stage - this is particularly important to understand, as you'll most likely be faced with slightly different molecules, so you need to know how to approach it logically. Any definitions are free marks so just learn them (flash cards are usually very effective for simple recall like that).

b) key words for biology. Past papers questions after topics are good, and mainly look very closely at the mark scheme - applicable to both subjects. There's a very key skill in being concise in your answers, but being clear and accurate. You need all the information they want, so one big give away as to how much you need to write is usually how many marks they award. Half a page of writing space doesn't mean you necessarily have to fill it, because you may begin to struggle with time.

c) in the exams, if you don't know... leave it and come back to it. Getting the marks you do know, and know confidently, is the best way to get going. It's not uncommon to get stressed when you turn over the paper and find it's something you don't really know. It's best just to leave it and approach it after everything else again, because otherwise you have the tendency to ramble on and miss the point entirely as you're panicking to get an answer.

There's no super secret to these things really. I pretty much just used a load of past papers where I could get them (as I was never big on reading notes, or rewriting, or making silly maps). That said, reaction maps can be useful for chemistry if you do do some organic group conversions.

Best way to see if you understand something? Try and explain it to someone else. People who know things well can correct you, but people who actually don't know ask the best questions because it drills down to the basic level. I think just trying to help out friends probably made me pay a bit more attention to the meaning behind what I was saying.

Edit: it's a lot about finding what works for you. An efficient hour of revision beats a useless three hour period.
Thanks very much. Very helpful points you've given there.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think receiving Teacher Assessed Grades will impact your future?

I'm worried it will negatively impact me getting into university/college (145)
42.9%
I'm worried that I’m not academically prepared for the next stage in my educational journey (39)
11.54%
I'm worried it will impact my future career (28)
8.28%
I'm worried that my grades will be seen as ‘lesser’ because I didn’t take exams (72)
21.3%
I don’t think that receiving these grades will impact my future (34)
10.06%
I think that receiving these grades will affect me in another way (let us know in the discussion!) (20)
5.92%

Watched Threads

View All