NooNoo1
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
i missed my first further maths lesson and he has set some hwk but i am really confused....i would really appreciate some help. the question is:

Find the values of p and q given that p+qi=1/12-5i
0
reply
j1i9s9s5
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
(Original post by NooNoo1)
i missed my first further maths lesson and he has set some hwk but i am really confused....i would really appreciate some help. the question is:

Find the values of p and q given that p+qi=1/12-5i
Equating real and imaginary parts of this equation will yield p and q. However the RHS is not immediately in a form that you can say this is the real part and this is the imaginary part. How can you re write the RHS so it is in the form a +bi (for some a and b)? HINT: Think about the conjugate of a complex number.
0
reply
Krollo
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 years ago
#3
You could also think about it as rationalising the denoninator.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
j1i9s9s5
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#4
Report 6 years ago
#4
(Original post by Krollo)
You could also think about it as rationalising the denoninator.

Posted from TSR Mobile
No, You are 'making' the denominator real not rationalising.
0
reply
Krollo
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 years ago
#5
(Original post by j1i9s9s5)
No, You are 'making' the denominator real not rationalising.
I said it could be thought of as rationalising as the processes are fairly similar. I never said it was rationalising.

Admittedly it's never a good idea to use wrong terminology, but you get where I'm coming from.
0
reply
Some Math Nerd
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 years ago
#6
(Original post by Krollo)
I said it could be thought of as rationalising as the processes are fairly similar. I never said it was rationalising.

Admittedly it's never a good idea to use wrong terminology, but you get where I'm coming from.
Technically you are 'realising' the denominator.
0
reply
Some Math Nerd
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 years ago
#7
Multiply the 1/(12-5i) by (12+5i)/(12+5i)

This gives (12+5i)/(144+25) = 12/169 + 5/169 i

so p=12/169 , q=5/169
0
reply
j1i9s9s5
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#8
Report 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by Some Math Nerd)
Multiply the 1/(12-5i) by (12+5i)/(12+5i)

This gives (12+5i)/(144+25) = 12/169 + 5/169 i

so p=12/169 , q=5/169
Please don't give them the answer straight away. You're supposed to try and help; not do it.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (63)
15%
I'm not sure (14)
3.33%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (142)
33.81%
I have already dropped out (6)
1.43%
I'm not a current university student (195)
46.43%

Watched Threads

View All