El Salvador
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#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
I'm thinking of sitting for GCSEs next year but am wondering if I'll actually need them to be ever qualified as a teacher in the UK. I think it'd be difficult with visas anyway but thought it would be nice to remove a barrier.

So I'm a fully qualified and registered teacher in Hong Kong with a Bachelor of Education degree from HKU that qualifies me to teach. I'm working on my Master of Science degree at Oxford which is relevant but does not qualify me to teach in the UK, ie not a Master of Teaching.

Since I didn't grow up in England, I did HKCEE instead of the GCSEs. I didn't do any science subject, and I have an equivalent of A* and B in English and mathematics. But apparently the English grade is not recognised because Hong Kong is not an English-speaking country? The maths one should be fine even though I'll need to pay extra for the documents to show an equivalence or something like that.

I'd be going for the assessment-only route if I'm ever going to be qualified.

I've asked the Department for Education and whilst they mentioned those minimum requirements, they did also say it actually comes down to the institution (in this case, the university that provides an assessment-only route) on whether I meet the requirements.

So then I asked Oxford Brookes but they only asked me to read their website which has no mentions of GCSE grades. But Southhampton and IoE both do mention those grades.

So do I actually need to sit for those GCSEs even though I'll have a master's degree?
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Shelly_x
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#2
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(Original post by clh_hilary)
I'm thinking of sitting for GCSEs next year but am wondering if I'll actually need them to be ever qualified as a teacher in the UK. I think it'd be difficult with visas anyway but thought it would be nice to remove a barrier.

So I'm a fully qualified and registered teacher in Hong Kong with a Bachelor of Education degree from HKU that qualifies me to teach. I'm working on my Master of Science degree at Oxford which is relevant but does not qualify me to teach in the UK, ie not a Master of Teaching.

Since I didn't grow up in England, I did HKCEE instead of the GCSEs. I didn't do any science subject, and I have an equivalent of A* and B in English and mathematics. But apparently the English grade is not recognised because Hong Kong is not an English-speaking country? The maths one should be fine even though I'll need to pay extra for the documents to show an equivalence or something like that.

I'd be going for the assessment-only route if I'm ever going to be qualified.

I've asked the Department for Education and whilst they mentioned those minimum requirements, they did also say it actually comes down to the institution (in this case, the university that provides an assessment-only route) on whether I meet the requirements.

So then I asked Oxford Brookes but they only asked me to read their website which has no mentions of GCSE grades. But Southhampton and IoE both do mention those grades.

So do I actually need to sit for those GCSEs even though I'll have a master's degree?
Yes you do need to sit the GCSEs if your existing grades aren't equivalent. You need to have the basic qualifications to be considered.

I'm slightly confused by you saying you're going to take the assessment only route. This route is generally for people who are already working as an unqualified teacher in schools and the school wants to train them. In addition, you need a course which provides QTS (qualified teacher status) at the end of it to become a teacher. Generally a 'masters in teaching' does not provide this. What you should be looking for are PGCE, Schools Direct, SCITT courses or Teach First.
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El Salvador
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#3
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
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(Original post by Shelly_x)
Yes you do need to sit the GCSEs if your existing grades aren't equivalent. You need to have the basic qualifications to be considered.

I'm slightly confused by you saying you're going to take the assessment only route. This route is generally for people who are already working as an unqualified teacher in schools and the school wants to train them. In addition, you need a course which provides QTS (qualified teacher status) at the end of it to become a teacher. Generally a 'masters in teaching' does not provide this. What you should be looking for are PGCE, Schools Direct, SCITT courses or Teach First.
Don't I get QTS with the assessment-only route?

PGCE is redundant for me as I already have a BEd. Knowledge-wise it's exactly the same, it's just that HK is not on the British government's list.

I can't do Teach First as I'll need a work visa. Probably not School Direct for the same reason either.
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Shelly_x
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#4
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(Original post by clh_hilary)
Don't I get QTS with the assessment-only route?

PGCE is redundant for me as I already have a BEd. Knowledge-wise it's exactly the same, it's just that HK is not on the British government's list.

I can't do Teach First as I'll need a work visa. Probably not School Direct for the same reason either.
Sorry, completely missed the part about you having a BEd. Assessment only is the best option for you then yes. You will need to secure a job to do the assessment only route though.
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El Salvador
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#5
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(Original post by Shelly_x)
Sorry, completely missed the part about you having a BEd. Assessment only is the best option for you then yes. You will need to secure a job to do the assessment only route though.
Yeah, I know. And actually need to be in two different schools. I don't think securing one job is going to be too difficult with my background plus my part-time experiences, but the second one is going to be tricky with work visa issues.

Just asking to see if I will need the GCSEs will I ever want to be qualified, since doing it next year is always better than trying to do it whilst working as a schoolteacher or something. I'm also thinking it will show that I'm serious about teaching in the UK anyway.
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Angelil
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#6
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Try the "overseas trained teachers" forum on TES for more specialised advice. I've done the assessment-only route, but wasn't a qualified teacher to begin with (unlike you), even in the country where I teach. People on the TES might be better-equipped to help you than we are, as there may well be many other routes to accreditation for people in your situation that we are unaware of.
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El Salvador
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#7
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#7
(Original post by Angelil)
Try the "overseas trained teachers" forum on TES for more specialised advice. I've done the assessment-only route, but wasn't a qualified teacher to begin with (unlike you), even in the country where I teach. People on the TES might be better-equipped to help you than we are, as there may well be many other routes to accreditation for people in your situation that we are unaware of.
Yeah will probably do. I'm planning to book a session with Oxford's career services regardless to ask about qualifications in every single place I have considered.

I think the biggest problem for me is that I am not an EU citizen, so I'll always need to stay on a work visa. This eliminates most of the alternative routes into teaching, and also makes the AO route difficult because the Home Office may just reject my second work visa, and they do with many other people who switched jobs in the UK.
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