Giulia Z
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I'm seriously interested in both but I just can't seem to pick...if anyone knows or takes either course, could you please give me a detailed rundown of what you study (and of course, which uni you're studying at)? I'm conflicted!
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Yawn11
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(Original post by Giulia Z)
I'm seriously interested in both but I just can't seem to pick...if anyone knows or takes either course, could you please give me a detailed rundown of what you study (and of course, which uni you're studying at)? I'm conflicted!
There isn't a huge difference in the two, except one tends to be is a bit more tailored to clinical side depending on the uni you go to, and is IBMS accredited.

It just depends on what you want out of the degree, and what exactly you intend to do after it.
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Giulia Z
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(Original post by Yawn11)
There isn't a huge difference in the two, except one tends to be is a bit more tailored to clinical side depending on the uni you go to, and is IBMS accredited.

It just depends on what you want out of the degree, and what exactly you intend to do after it.
I'm afraid that's the issue - there are bits in both I'd like to do. I feel as if I'm 'safer' in biology, meaning I'm surer of what I'd do there, but biomed sounds more exciting and getting into medical research isn't a bad prospect at all! But I have been preparing more for biology than biomed (supplemented reading material and so on)...
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Yawn11
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(Original post by Giulia Z)
I'm afraid that's the issue - there are bits in both I'd like to do. I feel as if I'm 'safer' in biology, meaning I'm surer of what I'd do there, but biomed sounds more exciting and getting into medical research isn't a bad prospect at all! But I have been preparing more for biology than biomed (supplemented reading material and so on)...
The career prospects don't differ greatly. You can still go into medical research with the right training post graduate training etc with a Biology the degree. And you can still become a Biology teacher with a Biomedical Science degree with the right training / post graduate study.

My best advice is to look over offered modules in detail for each Uni you're interested in, and try to consider which you'd find more interesting study.
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Giulia Z
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(Original post by Yawn11)
The career prospects don't differ greatly. You can still go into medical research with the right training post graduate training etc with a Biology the degree. And you can still become a Biology teacher with a Biomedical Science degree with the right training / post graduate study.

My best advice is to look over offered modules in detail for each Uni you're interested in, and try to consider which you'd find more interesting study.
Thanks for the advice, I'll just stare at the Uni of Edinburgh's website (which is really useless, it leads you around in circles) and try to discern the modules from there.
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SLClegg
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I'm currenty studying Biomedical science at Keele university (Second Year) and although i dont study biology i imagine they are rather similar. In terms of content it will differ from university to university so be sure to check what modules your chosen uni offer.
In my first year the content was 50% biochemistry and 50% Medical science related.
The biochemistry aspects for me were; Proteins and Enzymes, Metabolism, Cells and Organelles and inheritence and genetics
The Biomed related stuff included; Human biology and pathology, Case studies in medicine and Medical Lab sciences

If you are more interested in the medical side of science then i would definitely recommend Biomedical science as all of the content is related to the human body. If you prefer a more general view of all science and not just human biology then i would go for Biology.
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Giulia Z
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(Original post by SLClegg)
I'm currenty studying Biomedical science at Keele university (Second Year) and although i dont study biology i imagine they are rather similar. In terms of content it will differ from university to university so be sure to check what modules your chosen uni offer.
In my first year the content was 50% biochemistry and 50% Medical science related.
The biochemistry aspects for me were; Proteins and Enzymes, Metabolism, Cells and Organelles and inheritence and genetics
The Biomed related stuff included; Human biology and pathology, Case studies in medicine and Medical Lab sciences

If you are more interested in the medical side of science then i would definitely recommend Biomedical science as all of the content is related to the human body. If you prefer a more general view of all science and not just human biology then i would go for Biology.
Thanks for that! That's the opinion I'm getting too, it's just that I don't know whether I want to get into the biomed research field or just biology...I'm usually checking with unis how easy it is to switch between their courses in case I change my mind.
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chocolattelee
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In the same situation but chose biomedical at the end as I'm not enthral by the topics such as revolution or plants...but human body omgerd! Sounds fascinating.
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Giulia Z
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(Original post by chocolattelee)
In the same situation but chose biomedical at the end as I'm not enthral by the topics such as revolution or plants...but human body omgerd! Sounds fascinating.
I'm interested in evolution (though I think I will be at any rate) but not plants, but pathology too...oh it's so hard.
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chocolattelee
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(Original post by Giulia Z)
I'm interested in evolution (though I think I will be at any rate) but not plants, but pathology too...oh it's so hard.
Awh! Deadline in January...Goodluck
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Giulia Z
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(Original post by chocolattelee)
Awh! Deadline in January...Goodluck
Thanks! If only I could do both (NatSci would let me pick from the best but I'm going to need super duper grades for that)...
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Giulia Z
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Hi, I wonder if anyone is still following this thread...?
I heard that biomed is much more chem and math heavy than biology. Is this true? This might make me change my mind...
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SLClegg
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(Original post by Giulia Z)
Hi, I wonder if anyone is still following this thread...?
I heard that biomed is much more chem and math heavy than biology. Is this true? This might make me change my mind...
Being a Biomed student I tell you that yes Biomedical science does have a fair amount of Biochemistry. But Biochemistry isnt necessarily chemistry! For example, in biochemistry you focus more on the type of reactions that occur in the body such as the Krebs cycle. In terms of maths, yes biomed does require a good understanding of maths but my no means is the math involved difficult. If you did a-level chemistry then you will be familiar with the type of maths involved. For example, the type of maths i would use during my lab sessions is converting units, using dilution factors and possibly calculating moles and using equations. It is really simple once you know how to do it.

I cannot really comment on how much chemistry and maths is involved in Biology but i would imagine you still have to do some form of it in biology.
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chocolattelee
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(Original post by SLClegg)
Being a Biomed student I tell you that yes Biomedical science does have a fair amount of Biochemistry. But Biochemistry isnt necessarily chemistry! For example, in biochemistry you focus more on the type of reactions that occur in the body such as the Krebs cycle. In terms of maths, yes biomed does require a good understanding of maths but my no means is the math involved difficult. If you did a-level chemistry then you will be familiar with the type of maths involved. For example, the type of maths i would use during my lab sessions is converting units, using dilution factors and possibly calculating moles and using equations. It is really simple once you know how to do it.

I cannot really comment on how much chemistry and maths is involved in Biology but i would imagine you still have to do some form of it in biology.
Oooh talking about the maths bit, I do physics which involve a lot of calculation using varieties of equations etc. I suppose it will help a little bit?
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HeavyTeddy
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I think Biology will definitely be the safer option as you study animals, plants, fungi and bacteria in a holistic manner. Depending on the course, you have the flexibility to then pick the modules in the areas of biology that you're more interested in, which obviously helps tailor the course to precisely what you like. I was in the same position you were in and I actually thought that I preferred studying human physiology compared to pretty much anything else, but after my first year I now dislike human physiology and much prefer ecology and animal behaviour. Your interests might change, especially if you're not sure at this point. Perhaps look into courses that are more flexible with regards to module choice, or even courses that allow you to switch onto biomedical science after the first year (and vice versa).
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Giulia Z
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(Original post by HeavyTeddy)
I think Biology will definitely be the safer option as you study animals, plants, fungi and bacteria in a holistic manner. Depending on the course, you have the flexibility to then pick the modules in the areas of biology that you're more interested in, which obviously helps tailor the course to precisely what you like. I was in the same position you were in and I actually thought that I preferred studying human physiology compared to pretty much anything else, but after my first year I now dislike human physiology and much prefer ecology and animal behaviour. Your interests might change, especially if you're not sure at this point. Perhaps look into courses that are more flexible with regards to module choice, or even courses that allow you to switch onto biomedical science after the first year (and vice versa).
Thanks a lot for the useful advice! I have been checking around for flexibility of the courses and modules and hence found some very good courses for me. I also thought I'd find human physiology interesting but after doing the Krebs cycle and so on, I really don't want to do any more. So many biomedical sciences isn't appropriate for me...?
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SLClegg
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(Original post by chocolattelee)
Oooh talking about the maths bit, I do physics which involve a lot of calculation using varieties of equations etc. I suppose it will help a little bit?
Absolutely! I imagine the maths involved in physics is much harder.
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