coinín
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I was scheduled to start a GCSE course locally recently, but due to a funding mishap, I am forced to look elsewhere.
The NEC (National Extended College) offers both GCSE and IGCSE Maths subjects, the former being modular tripartite examination, while the latter is a linear two paper job.
I have a few questions:

I know everyone is different, but is there any real difference between the two?

Is the subject matter the same?

Which version is the "easiest" to get an A* in? (going by grades)

Are modular examinations easier in general? (I've never done them before)


Thanks
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gdunne42
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(Original post by coinín)
I was scheduled to start a GCSE course locally recently, but due to a funding mishap, I am forced to look elsewhere.
The NEC (National Extended College) offers both GCSE and IGCSE Maths subjects, the former being modular tripartite examination, while the latter is a linear two paper job.
I have a few questions:

I know everyone is different, but is there any real difference between the two?

Is the subject matter the same?

Which version is the "easiest" to get an A* in? (going by grades)

Are modular examinations easier in general? (I've never done them before)


Thanks
Although the modular gcse exam papers are still available from Edexcel (and I assume other examiners), all 3 now have to be taken in the same exam period. It isn't possible to take them at different times of the year and combine the results at the end. In my area all schools but one that used them have now switched to the 2 exam linear syllabus. I mention this only to advise against preparing for the modular exam structure unless you have already found a centre offering the exams.

IGCSE does contain some additional more challenging content that you would have to learn if you aspired to an A* grade. Gcse on the other hand has a significant chunk of marks allocated to functional and problem solving questions that many students seem to find hard to prepare for.

If your aptitude for maths is such that an A* grade is realistic do you really need to buy a self study package to prepare for it?


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Sena5
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(Original post by coinín)
I was scheduled to start a GCSE course locally recently, but due to a funding mishap, I am forced to look elsewhere.
The NEC (National Extended College) offers both GCSE and IGCSE Maths subjects, the former being modular tripartite examination, while the latter is a linear two paper job.
I have a few questions:

I know everyone is different, but is there any real difference between the two?

Is the subject matter the same?

Which version is the "easiest" to get an A* in? (going by grades)

Are modular examinations easier in general? (I've never done them before)

Thanks

Yes, IGCSE is for International students outside the UK. If you are a UK student you sit GCSE. Only the names of the paper differ but, the same questions appear I guess. Just download two papers each from GCSE and IGCSE from www.edexcel.com and compare. Try to download 2 same past papers from the International centre and UK centre edexcel site. You will have to try the questions and see which is easy for you.
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Edminzodo
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(Original post by Sena5)
Yes, IGCSE is for International students outside the UK. If you are a UK student you sit GCSE. Only the names of the paper differ but, the same questions appear I guess. Just download two papers each from GCSE and IGCSE from www.edexcel.com and compare. Try to download 2 same past papers from the International centre and UK centre edexcel site. You will have to try the questions and see which is easy for you.
I'm a U.K. student and I sat the iGCSE.

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Sena5
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(Original post by Edminzodo)
I'm a U.K. student and I sat the iGCSE.

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that's alright..whatever you do you are done with O-Level part!
Even a uk student my sister tutored did the IGCSE like you so it's not an issue. If you get good satisfied grades, advance to AS Level and thereafter A2
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Knee Grow
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(Original post by Edminzodo)
I'm a U.K. student and I sat the iGCSE.

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I think Edexcel iGCSE is exclusively for international students but CIE iGCSE is available to all students. I'm not 100% sure though, so feel free to correct me if I'm wrong

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Edminzodo
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(Original post by Knee Grow)
I think Edexcel iGCSE is exclusively for international students but CIE iGCSE is available to all students. I'm not 100% sure though, so feel free to correct me if I'm wrong

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I did Edexcel iGCSE! My whole year did it so I guess it's not.

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Andy98
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(Original post by coinín)
I was scheduled to start a GCSE course locally recently, but due to a funding mishap, I am forced to look elsewhere.
The NEC (National Extended College) offers both GCSE and IGCSE Maths subjects, the former being modular tripartite examination, while the latter is a linear two paper job.
I have a few questions:

I know everyone is different, but is there any real difference between the two?

Is the subject matter the same?

Which version is the "easiest" to get an A* in? (going by grades)

Are modular examinations easier in general? (I've never done them before)


Thanks
I'd go linear

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vickidc18
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igcse maths is loads harder than just gcse i was looking at the past papers and the formulae needed was loads more!!
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cheeriosarenice
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(Original post by vickidc18)
igcse maths is loads harder than just gcse i was looking at the past papers and the formulae needed was loads more!!
which one? edexcel or cie?
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vickidc18
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both, a gcse paper is so much easier.
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Hyperthy
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I am a uk student who sat the Edexcel IGCSE.

The IGCSE was initially created as an alternative to GCSEs for international students whose first language may not have be English (over 20 years ago). However as GCSEs have changed (become modular, easier and added controlled assessments moving focus away from exams) the IGCSE has stayed the same. So now IGCSEs are like older GCSEs and are slightly harder and have more of a focus on exams sat at the end of the course.

Also where GCSEs have controlled assessment the IGCSEs have coursework, but this tends to count for a smaller part of the course. (doesn't really apply for maths )
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coinín
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(Original post by Hyperthy)
Also where GCSEs have controlled assessment the IGCSEs have coursework, but this tends to count for a smaller part of the course. (doesn't really apply for maths )
When I did GCSE Maths in 2009, we did a calculator paper and a non-calculator paper, with no other forms of assessment. When I was in year 7, coursework was dropped AFAIK.
The course I'm going on says nothing about coursework. Exams make up 100% of course.

I know what the difference is between the two. I'm also going to be studying IGCSE Physics and Chemistry via the NEC as there's nowhere local I can do the GCSE equivalent.

(Original post by gdunne42)
IGCSE does contain some additional more challenging content that you would have to learn if you aspired to an A* grade. Gcse on the other hand has a significant chunk of marks allocated to functional and problem solving questions that many students seem to find hard to prepare for.
Could you possibly give some examples?

(Original post by gdunne42)
If your aptitude for maths is such that an A* grade is realistic do you really need to buy a self study package to prepare for it?
Honestly, I have no idea if I'll even get a C, let alone an A*.
I've been working through Algebra 1 on Khanacademy.com for the past 6 months and feel pretty confident in the majority of questions, but not the harder stuff.
I haven't even touched some of the other stuff (Geometry, statistics, et cetera), and I'm terrified I'll either learn the wrong stuff, or not be prepared for what I am expecting.


thanks.

Rabbit!
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MOscar96
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I would also like to know the answer to this question as I am applying for IGCSE maths higher.
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nox1
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IGCSE doesn't have a non-calculator paper, which is good
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pbunny
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(Original post by coinín)
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I've done IGCSE (CIE) Maths and can definitely say that it's more challenging than GCSE maths (i'm basing my judgement off a couple of past papers i've looked through). I think you should do it instead of the gcse equivalent to challenge yourself. However, if you aren't up for it do IGCSE (Edexcel) maths. I know several people that have done it and they all agree that it's slightly easier than the CIE course.

I've never taken any modular exams so I can't really answer that question. Linear exams aren't all that bad though but you've obviously got everything riding on those two exams. Screw one of the papers up and you've got absolutely no chance of getting an A or A*.
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gdunne42
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(Original post by coinín)
Could you possibly give some examples?

Honestly, I have no idea if I'll even get a C, let alone an A*.
I've been working through Algebra 1 on Khanacademy.com for the past 6 months and feel pretty confident in the majority of questions, but not the harder stuff.
I haven't even touched some of the other stuff (Geometry, statistics, et cetera), and I'm terrified I'll either learn the wrong stuff, or not be prepared for what I am expecting.
In the Edexcel IGCSE/Level 2 Certificate syllabus
- differentiation, tangents and turning points
- functions, composite functions, inverse functions

If you think its a challenge, stick with linear gcse
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coinín
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(Original post by gdunne42)
In the Edexcel IGCSE/Level 2 Certificate syllabus
- differentiation, tangents and turning points
- functions, composite functions, inverse functions

If you think its a challenge, stick with linear gcse
Thanks buddy

I've just realised your description says Bucks

I'm planning on going to Henley College next year
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C0balt
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I sat all my IGCSE exams with CIE including IGCSE Maths.
I have seen GCSE papers from other exam boards and CIE IGCSE is a lot harder and has more topic such as Matrix and Matrix transformation including sheer and stretch which are not in GCSE syllabi.

I liked the exam board though. It's pretty well marked (never heard of weird ridiculously low grade or anything) and the paper is well designed.

In terms of grade boundaries, it's ridiculously low for every subject except Maths. Maths is always around 90% raw mark.

If you decide to go with IGCSE then xtremepapers will be your best friend.
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cheeriosarenice
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[QUOTE=pbunny;50461337]I've done IGCSE (CIE) Maths and can definitely say that it's more challenging than GCSE maths QUOTE]

(Original post by C0balt)
I sat all my IGCSE exams with CIE including IGCSE Maths.
I have seen GCSE papers from other exam boards and CIE IGCSE is a lot harder

iGCSE is only harder in maths & science.
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