Nina77
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Hi guys,
Can anyone recommend me a course apart from nursing that has a background in the human body and disease, but doesn't involve a lot of lab work. It would be good if there's patient contact involved as well.
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mattdennies
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That's quite a hard question because you generally either work in a lab (biomed etc.) or you work with the patients (which is nursing or medicine!). If you're willing to work less with 'diseased' patients and more a wide range of patients then all the allied healthcare professions have a lot of contact with patients eg. Physio, OT, Radiography, Theatre Assistant.


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superwolf
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I'd have a look on the NHS Careers website. It's got loads of good introductions to various careers, and you might find something that really suits you.

Personally I'm applying to become an occupational therapist, which has tons of flexibility in what you can finally end up doing - you can specialise in various areas, and work in all kinds of positions.
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Nina77
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(Original post by mattdennies)
That's quite a hard question because you generally either work in a lab (biomed etc.) or you work with the patients (which is nursing or medicine!). If you're willing to work less with 'diseased' patients and more a wide range of patients then all the allied healthcare professions have a lot of contact with patients eg. Physio, OT, Radiography, Theatre Assistant.


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Do you know what universities have a good course for these healthcare professions? Also, is a career in the NHS guaranteed after you finish the course or do you have to find a job yourself?
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Nina77
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(Original post by superwolf)
I'd have a look on the NHS Careers website. It's got loads of good introductions to various careers, and you might find something that really suits you.

Personally I'm applying to become an occupational therapist, which has tons of flexibility in what you can finally end up doing - you can specialise in various areas, and work in all kinds of positions.
Can't believe I haven't thought of the NHS careers website. Thank you!
What universities are you looking to apply to if I may ask?
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mattdennies
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(Original post by Nina77)
Do you know what universities have a good course for these healthcare professions? Also, is a career in the NHS guaranteed after you finish the course or do you have to find a job yourself?
There's no real answer to which Uni's are good, it depends on the profession, have a look at the League Tables.

You're not guaranteed a job after qualifying but as the NHS control the number of places they fund, they essentially control the job market ensuring the number of people of trained meets demand, meaning there's a high chance of getting a job.
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superwolf
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(Original post by Nina77)
Can't believe I haven't thought of the NHS careers website. Thank you!
What universities are you looking to apply to if I may ask?
No problem.

I'm most likely applying to Salford, York St John, Cumbria, Sheffield Hallam and Queen Margaret's (Edinburgh). I haven't been to the last two's open days yet, but the first three all really impressed me with their OT departments.
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Nina77
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(Original post by mattdennies)
There's no real answer to which Uni's are good, it depends on the profession, have a look at the League Tables.

You're not guaranteed a job after qualifying but as the NHS control the number of places they fund, they essentially control the job market ensuring the number of people of trained meets demand, meaning there's a high chance of getting a job.
So does it matter whether it is Russell group or not?
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Nina77
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(Original post by superwolf)
No problem.

I'm most likely applying to Salford, York St John, Cumbria, Sheffield Hallam and Queen Margaret's (Edinburgh). I haven't been to the last two's open days yet, but the first three all really impressed me with their OT departments.
Sheffield Hallam is good I heard
Have you written a relevant work experience in your personal statement?
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superwolf
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(Original post by Nina77)
Sheffield Hallam is good I heard
Have you written a relevant work experience in your personal statement?
Yeah, I've heard the same thing, although I'm hoping to stay in Salford, as it's local to me.

I've yet to write my personal statement, as I'm waiting to start some volunteering work I want to include. So far I've done a morning of shadowing OTs in a hospital though, and I think once my volunteering's started I should have quite a lot to write about.
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Pectorac
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(Original post by Nina77)
So does it matter whether it is Russell group or not?
For something like nursing or physiotherapy, not at all. Hospitals don't care which university you went to or even what degree class you get. When you graduate and qualify, you get a PIN number which says you're a qualified nurse or physiotherapist, and that number proving you're qualified is all they care about.

Whether you went to a Russell Group university or not, and got a first class degree or a third, you've still had to complete all the training which makes you a competent nurse or physiotherapist, monitored by the external bodies.
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Nina77
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(Original post by superwolf)
Yeah, I've heard the same thing, although I'm hoping to stay in Salford, as it's local to me.

I've yet to write my personal statement, as I'm waiting to start some volunteering work I want to include. So far I've done a morning of shadowing OTs in a hospital though, and I think once my volunteering's started I should have quite a lot to write about.
It sounds like a good application then well good luck and thanks for your answers
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Nina77
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(Original post by Pectorac)
For something like nursing or physiotherapy, not at all. Hospitals don't care which university you went to or even what degree class you get. When you graduate and qualify, you get a PIN number which says you're a qualified nurse or physiotherapist, and that number proving you're qualified is all they care about.

Whether you went to a Russell Group university or not, and got a first class degree or a third, you've still had to complete all the training which makes you a competent nurse or physiotherapist, monitored by the external bodies.
Thank you! This is the first time I've heard about the PIN number and it's really helpful
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superwolf
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(Original post by Nina77)
It sounds like a good application then well good luck and thanks for your answers
No problem, good luck with finding the right career for you!
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Pectorac
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(Original post by Nina77)
Thank you! This is the first time I've heard about the PIN number and it's really helpful
No problem. It's a registration number for physiotherapy, but most people in the field call it a PIN number. The site http://www.hcpc-uk.org.uk/check/ shows you who's qualified as a physiotherapist (and other healthcare professions), and as long as you're on that register, it doesn't matter which university you went to at all. As another user said, the external bodies representing healthcare professions control the number of student places in line with how many jobs will be available, so you're pretty much guaranteed a job.
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Nina77
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(Original post by Pectorac)
No problem. It's a registration number for physiotherapy, but most people in the field call it a PIN number. The site http://www.hcpc-uk.org.uk/check/ shows you who's qualified as a physiotherapist (and other healthcare professions), and as long as you're on that register, it doesn't matter which university you went to at all. As another user said, the external bodies representing healthcare professions control the number of student places in line with how many jobs will be available, so you're pretty much guaranteed a job.
Glad to hear it!
I have some hospital work experiences, but I pretty much shadowed doctors. I also did a biochemistry course for summer school. Are they worth mentioning for healthcare professions?
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Pectorac
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(Original post by Nina77)
Glad to hear it!
I have some hospital work experiences, but I pretty much shadowed doctors. I also did a biochemistry course for summer school. Are they worth mentioning for healthcare professions?
Yes, definitely. Anything you've done which shows you have an insight of what you're applying for (and what you've learned from it), is incredibly beneficial for healthcare applications.
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Nina77
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(Original post by Pectorac)
Yes, definitely. Anything you've done which shows you have an insight of what you're applying for (and what you've learned from it), is incredibly beneficial for healthcare applications.
Thank you and sorry for asking lots of questions
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Pectorac
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(Original post by Nina77)
Thank you and sorry for asking lots of questions
It's fine; questions are what this site is for!
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mattdennies
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I'd argue that employers do care about where your degree is from and what grade it is. If you have a choice between employing someone with a 1st or 2:1 from a respectable/ top 10 uni for that subject compared to someone with a 3rd from a uni you've never heard of, they are a lot more likely to pick the former. Why would they want to employ someone who could only get into a less competitive uni and barely managed to get their degree when they could choose someone who showed aptitude and dedication to get into a good uni and worked their arse off to get a good degree?

It's true howeverthat for allied healthcare degrees going to a Russell Group Uni doesn't put you at that much of an advantage.

I'm starting Physio at Liverpool btw.
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