Tuition fees funding for Medicine as second degree

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Aleexxie
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Hi

If I can preface this by a little background information: I am a 21 year old, final year Law student and I'm applying to Medicine for the September 2015 intake. I'll be applying for graduate entry at Kings (4 years, A102) and undergraduate entry at Kings, Queen Marys and St Georges (5 years, A100). In terms of education, I received AAAB at A levels in Chemistry, Biology, Religious Studies and Maths and secured 2950 in the UKCAT.

My main concern is tuition funding for Medicine and I'm struggling to make a heads or tails with funding for medicine as a graduate. Financially, our household income is above £60k but I have two younger brothers who are going to university in 2 years so my parents won't be able to support me much. I live near London so I am able to commute to London - as a result I only need to pay tuition fees. As far as I'm aware, I have the following issues:


  1. Graduate Entry, 4 year course - for this course it seems I would pay the first £3,600 and then apply for support (if any) via NHS bursary. The remainder of the tuition fees would be covered by a student finance loan. This is probably the ideal situation.
  2. Undergraduate Entry, 5 year course - I'm aware that GEM is fierce so I decided I would apply to undergraduate programmes to maximise my chances of securing a place in medicine. Unfortunately this is where I don't understand how financing works. I've looked at materials online and it seems to be the case that neither student finance will fund it nor would the NHS cover it.
  3. What to put on UCAS - regarding the UCAS application, what would I put down in terms of funding? Would it be private funding or count as student finance funding?


Thank you to everyone who replies I'm fairly new to these forums (I have lurked for a long time though) but I will try and respond to any further questions/answers as soon as possible.

Many thanks,


Alex
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hellodave5
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Take a few years out to work. You can fund that money yourself in a year, 2 max. I'm going to do this masters degree, then contemplating doing GEM, after a year out of education working.
I'll be like, old, when I finish (28), but it's getting there that counts IMO
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ForestCat
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(Original post by Aleexxie)
Hi

If I can preface this by a little background information: I am a 21 year old, final year Law student and I'm applying to Medicine for the September 2015 intake. I'll be applying for graduate entry at Kings (4 years, A102) and undergraduate entry at Kings, Queen Marys and St Georges (5 years, A100). In terms of education, I received AAAB at A levels in Chemistry, Biology, Religious Studies and Maths and secured 2950 in the UKCAT.

My main concern is tuition funding for Medicine and I'm struggling to make a heads or tails with funding for medicine as a graduate. Financially, our household income is above £60k but I have two younger brothers who are going to university in 2 years so my parents won't be able to support me much. I live near London so I am able to commute to London - as a result I only need to pay tuition fees. As far as I'm aware, I have the following issues:


  1. Graduate Entry, 4 year course - for this course it seems I would pay the first £3,600 and then apply for support (if any) via NHS bursary. The remainder of the tuition fees would be covered by a student finance loan. This is probably the ideal situation.
  2. Undergraduate Entry, 5 year course - I'm aware that GEM is fierce so I decided I would apply to undergraduate programmes to maximise my chances of securing a place in medicine. Unfortunately this is where I don't understand how financing works. I've looked at materials online and it seems to be the case that neither student finance will fund it nor would the NHS cover it.
  3. What to put on UCAS - regarding the UCAS application, what would I put down in terms of funding? Would it be private funding or count as student finance funding?


Thank you to everyone who replies I'm fairly new to these forums (I have lurked for a long time though) but I will try and respond to any further questions/answers as soon as possible.

Many thanks,


Alex
1) You're right about GEM. First year you pay £3465 up front and get a student finance loan for the rest. The following years you get the loan for the same amount but the NHS pays the £3465. You still get a SFE maintenance loan in first year and then NHS bursary in following years. But part of these loans/bursaries are means tested and as you're 21 (and I assume you haven't been supporting yourself for three years) this will mean it will be based on your parents income.

2) If you go for 5 year entry you have to pay the £9000 per year, up front each year, for the first four years. The NHS will pay the final year. As far as I am aware you can still get the maintenance loan but absolutely no support with tuition fees. It is an incredibly expensive way of doing it and very difficult unless you have a)worked and saved for many years b) got a very generous family c) received an inheritance/won the lottery etc.

Hope that helps

p.s. some unis put all this in much better format http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ssds/we...s-from-england and Funding for GEM (Graduate Entry Medicine) students - The University of Nottingham
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ForestCat
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(Original post by hellodave5)
Take a few years out to work. You can fund that money yourself in a year, 2 max. I'm going to do this masters degree, then contemplating doing GEM, after a year out of education working.
I'll be like, old, when I finish (28), but it's getting there that counts IMO
I want whatever job that will allow you to save £36k in 1 or 2 years, please!
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Aleexxie
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(Original post by ForestCat)
1) You're right about GEM. First year you pay £3465 up front and get a student finance loan for the rest. The following years you get the loan for the same amount but the NHS pays the £3465. You still get a SFE maintenance loan in first year and then NHS bursary in following years. But part of these loans/bursaries are means tested and as you're 21 (and I assume you haven't been supporting yourself for three years) this will mean it will be based on your parents income.

2) If you go for 5 year entry you have to pay the £9000 per year, up front each year, for the first four years. The NHS will pay the final year. As far as I am aware you can still get the maintenance loan but absolutely no support with tuition fees. It is an incredibly expensive way of doing it and very difficult unless you have a)worked and saved for many years b) got a very generous family c) received an inheritance/won the lottery etc.

Hope that helps

p.s. some unis put all this in much better format http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ssds/we...s-from-england and Funding for GEM (Graduate Entry Medicine) students - The University of Nottingham
Thanks for the clarification - I guess it's more or less what I was thinking.

With the 5 year programme, would I be able to request the full £3500 maintenance loan despite living with parents? If this is the case then at least overall it would be £5,500 per year as opposed to £9k.
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Ronove
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(Original post by Aleexxie)
Hi

If I can preface this by a little background information: I am a 21 year old, final year Law student and I'm applying to Medicine for the September 2015 intake. I'll be applying for graduate entry at Kings (4 years, A102) and undergraduate entry at Kings, Queen Marys and St Georges (5 years, A100). In terms of education, I received AAAB at A levels in Chemistry, Biology, Religious Studies and Maths and secured 2950 in the UKCAT.

My main concern is tuition funding for Medicine and I'm struggling to make a heads or tails with funding for medicine as a graduate. Financially, our household income is above £60k but I have two younger brothers who are going to university in 2 years so my parents won't be able to support me much. I live near London so I am able to commute to London - as a result I only need to pay tuition fees. As far as I'm aware, I have the following issues:


  1. Graduate Entry, 4 year course - for this course it seems I would pay the first £3,600 and then apply for support (if any) via NHS bursary. The remainder of the tuition fees would be covered by a student finance loan. This is probably the ideal situation.
  2. Undergraduate Entry, 5 year course - I'm aware that GEM is fierce so I decided I would apply to undergraduate programmes to maximise my chances of securing a place in medicine. Unfortunately this is where I don't understand how financing works. I've looked at materials online and it seems to be the case that neither student finance will fund it nor would the NHS cover it.
  3. What to put on UCAS - regarding the UCAS application, what would I put down in terms of funding? Would it be private funding or count as student finance funding?


Thank you to everyone who replies I'm fairly new to these forums (I have lurked for a long time though) but I will try and respond to any further questions/answers as soon as possible.

Many thanks,


Alex
Do NOT waste a choice on KCL 5-year! They routinely offer a place on the 5-year to people who don't quite get a GEM offer. Give yourself a shot at somewhere else.
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hellodave5
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(Original post by ForestCat)
I want whatever job that will allow you to save £36k in 1 or 2 years, please!
How much would it actually cost, with the support of SFE?
I have yet to calculate exactly. All I know is it will be quite a lot.
Could make decent savings if live with parents whilst working - never that much though :P
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Davelittle
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(Original post by ForestCat)
I want whatever job that will allow you to save £36k in 1 or 2 years, please!
Only thing I can think of is an investment banker who is careful with their money!
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Ronove
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(Original post by hellodave5)
How much would it actually cost, with the support of SFE?
I have yet to calculate exactly. All I know is it will be quite a lot.
Could make decent savings if live with parents whilst working - never that much though :P
£36k on tuition fees as a minimum, but likely a fair bit extra to top up the maintenance loan as well. I can't imagine you having an easy time without at least an extra £2k for living costs each year.
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ForestCat
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(Original post by Aleexxie)
Thanks for the clarification - I guess it's more or less what I was thinking.

With the 5 year programme, would I be able to request the full £3500 maintenance loan despite living with parents? If this is the case then at least overall it would be £5,500 per year as opposed to £9k.
Yes, 3500 is the non means tested amount but wouldn't you need that to live on... Transport, food, drink, socialising etc. Paying yourself through a five year course is not an easy option and there aren't really any quick fixes when it comes to finance.

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hellodave5
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(Original post by Ronove)
£36k on tuition fees as a minimum, but likely a fair bit extra to top up the maintenance loan as well. I can't imagine you having an easy time without at least an extra £2k for living costs each year.
So I would need 36k on hand whilst doing the course, to pay as I'm doing it?
:O
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Aleexxie
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(Original post by Ronove)
Do NOT waste a choice on KCL 5-year! They routinely offer a place on the 5-year to people who don't quite get a GEM offer. Give yourself a shot at somewhere else.
Hi Thanks for replying.

In relation to this do you have any statistics? I have looked online and so far all I can find is 24 places available on GEM programme. Do you know how many applicants there are and how many applicants get interviewed? And most importantly, how many applicants received offers for the 5 year programme.
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Ronove
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(Original post by hellodave5)
So I would need 36k on hand whilst doing the course, to pay as I'm doing it?
:O
You pay upfront, yes. I'm not sure to what extent most med schools expect you to prove in advance before starting first year that you will have the funds for the whole course (I think I read that Cambridge does so, but it may be something that's easily negotiable even then, I have no idea).

(Original post by Aleexxie)
Hi Thanks for replying.

In relation to this do you have any statistics? I have looked online and so far all I can find is 24 places available on GEM programme. Do you know how many applicants there are and how many applicants get interviewed? And most importantly, how many applicants received offers for the 5 year programme.
It's purely from observing GEM applications on here the last three or so years. You could perhaps ask their admissions office whether they're still in the habit of doing this and whether they would advise you to use a choice on their 5-year as well (should give you a good idea of how much they do it, depending on what they advise).
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hellodave5
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(Original post by Ronove)
You pay upfront, yes. I'm not sure to what extent most med schools expect you to prove in advance before starting first year that you will have the funds for the whole course (I think I read that Cambridge does so, but it may be something that's easily negotiable even then, I have no idea).


It's purely from observing GEM applications on here the last three or so years. You could perhaps ask their admissions office whether they're still in the habit of doing this and whether they would advise you to use a choice on their 5-year as well (should give you a good idea of how much they do it, depending on what they advise).
"Graduate Entry, 4 year course - for this course it seems I would pay the first £3,600 and then apply for support (if any) via NHS bursary. The remainder of the tuition fees would be covered by a student finance loan. This is probably the ideal situation."

But doesn't student finance provide most of the fees, to be paid back at a later date?
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ForestCat
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(Original post by hellodave5)
"Graduate Entry, 4 year course - for this course it seems I would pay the first £3,600 and then apply for support (if any) via NHS bursary. The remainder of the tuition fees would be covered by a student finance loan. This is probably the ideal situation."

But doesn't student finance provide most of the fees, to be paid back at a later date?
We're talking about grads on the five year course.

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