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    i have received my first lot of reading i need to do an i get more each day and i just can;t see myself reading a book in enough detail and making notes if i have all that to do. at the moment i read a page and make notes on it but i was wondering if this is too detailed? i would like to speed up my note taking and reading so i would like to know how people take notes from reading books, do you just read it and write down things you think could be useful or do you summarise each page or summarise each chapter?
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    I would say not to do too much reading. Its better to read in preparation for a lecture rather than afterwards I think
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    It depends on the page. some might be incredibly important and contain the key points of that chapter, others might be expository and contain nothing worth writin down at all.
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    If you have to read the 'whole book', first read the introduction & conclusion to see the main arguments laid out. Often the introduction will explain the layout of the rest of the chapters, so you might then be able to hone in on a few specific ones depending on the information you need, and just read those. You will learn with time how to read things faster; unless you feel it's critically important stuff, try to use a lighter hand while making notes. I know especially when the information is brand new it's tempting to note down everything, but try & limit yourself to key points: often these will be in the first few & last few paragraphs of a chapter, with the supporting evidence in the middle.
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    (Original post by gutenberg)
    If you have to read the 'whole book', first read the introduction & conclusion to see the main arguments laid out. Often the introduction will explain the layout of the rest of the chapters, so you might then be able to hone in on a few specific ones depending on the information you need, and just read those. You will learn with time how to read things faster; unless you feel it's critically important stuff, try to use a lighter hand while making notes. I know especially when the information is brand new it's tempting to note down everything, but try & limit yourself to key points: often these will be in the first few & last few paragraphs of a chapter, with the supporting evidence in the middle.
    This is excellent advice :yy: Reading the introduction and conclusion of each chapter is also useful for not wasting time on irrelevant things.

    (Original post by tgwktm)
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    From my experience it is better to read everything they tell you to read each week for lectures/seminars. It will all be relevant to the discussion/exams and you need to stay on top of it. You don't need to make massively detailed notes - just try to pick out the important things.

    Over time you will get faster at reading and more efficient at taking notes. This is one of the skills you get from university!!

    Whilst you're making notes, I'd highly recommend making a note of the Title, Author, Publisher, ISBN etc. and Page Number in the margin as this will massively help you later when it comes to writing and referencing essays!

    I used to go and sit in a coffee shop to make my reading a bit more bearable! So just keep at it, it will get easier.
 
 
 
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