Is it up to schools to make sure kids from disadvantaged backgrounds do well?

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Poll: Who should be responsible for making sure kids from disadvatages backgrounds do well?
The School (3)
27.27%
The family (3)
27.27%
The government (0)
0%
Everyone (5)
45.45%
Other (0)
0%
Puddles the Monkey
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#1
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As title.

How far does the responsibility lie on the schools, and how much does it lie on the family or society in general?

Apparently even excellently rated schools don't do enough to close the gap.
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llys
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What do you mean by "do well"? Of course it is the responsibility of schools to educate all attending children to the best of their abilities.
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by llys)
What do you mean by "do well"? Of course it is the responsibility of schools to educate all attending children to the best of their abilities.
Right now there's a significant difference in academic achievement depending on social class... so I guess what I'm asking is to what extent are schools responsible for closing that gap? OR - do schools even have the resources to be able to close that gap?

Does the responsibility lie on schools alone, or should the government/family/society take responsibility by making sure that children across the UK are in a position where they have access to the resources they need to be able to learn.
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Canada Eh
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I think it should be the responsibility of both the family and the school. Schools are a second home for many children, especially those children who come from a disadvantaged background. While parents should always take interest in their children, unfortunately that is not how the entire world works. That is where the school needs to step in to be there to support these children who are perhaps going through these tough times.
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hellodave5
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The schools entirely. It is the dependence on the family and child currently that brings about the disparity due to socioeconomic status, it seems. One of the great failures of British schooling.
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TenOfThem
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
As title.

How far does the responsibility lie on the schools, and how much does it lie on the family or society in general?

Apparently even excellently rated schools don't do enough to close the gap.
Are you asking whose responsibility it is to ensure they do well academically?


It depends on the age of the child

If the government ensured there was adequate funding and support for families pre-school then students would not begin school at such a disadvantage

During primary school (possibly up to Y8) it is the school's responsibility - however without appropriate funding and support from the government this is an impossible burden on the schools

Then after that age I would say it is the student's responsibility
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Mackay
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Education isn't purely based on schooling though, is it? If you think it is then you're a fool.

There needs to be focus on education from all sides so the students become as well-rounded as possible. Education doesn't simply begin and end in the classroom - the majority of key things children learn is in their formative years at home surrounded by family. Likewise, peers have a massive influence as well as idols, too.
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Puddles the Monkey
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(Original post by TenOfThem)
Are you asking whose responsibility it is to ensure they do well academically?


It depends on the age of the child

If the government ensured there was adequate funding and support for families pre-school then students would not begin school at such a disadvantage

During primary school (possibly up to Y8) it is the school's responsibility - however without appropriate funding and support from the government this is an impossible burden on the schools

Then after that age I would say it is the student's responsibility
Academically, yes.

I agree that the government needs to tackle the social/economics problems that families face, as well as providing schools with the necessary resources they need. Free school meals for everyone is a massive step in the right direction, I think.

In Japan there's a very small gap in achievement between those from poorer backgrounds and more well off children - I wonder why that is?
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llys
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(Original post by Mackay)
Education isn't purely based on schooling though, is it? If you think it is then you're a fool.
Education in *this* context is 5 GCSE A*-C including English and Maths. These reports are always about whose responsibility it is for children to achieve the absolute baseline, not whose responsibility it is for them to become well-rounded, or to achieve their dreams, or win a nobel prize in the future, etc.
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llys
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
Right now there's a significant difference in academic achievement depending on social class... so I guess what I'm asking is to what extent are schools responsible for closing that gap? OR - do schools even have the resources to be able to close that gap?

Does the responsibility lie on schools alone, or should the government/family/society take responsibility by making sure that children across the UK are in a position where they have access to the resources they need to be able to learn.
I think that schools are responsible (up to GCSE). For home-schooled pupils, parents are responsible. At A-level I would agree (with a previous poster) that the students themselves are responsible, but I think that most GCSE pupils are still developmentally too immature to learn / study without good solid teaching and an imposed work ethic structure, although of course there are positive exceptions.

What extra resources do you need? I think most children who are not mentally disabled can be taught using existing resources. The government can't teach pupils, it can't motivate pupils and it can't develop discipline in pupils, whereas good schools (good teachers) everywhere already do all of these things! I do not think / have ever read anywhere that countries with a smaller achievement gap achieve it by providing additional "resources" specifically for poorer children, unlike the pupil premium in England. (But I stand to be corrected if you have information on this - I've just never seen this anywhere.) I suppose you could request additional resources to make it easier for poorer pupils to attend school in the first place (like free bus passes, free care worker support for young carers, ...), but it is still the school's responsibility to educate them once they are there.

Of course parents should also motivate and discipline, so obviously that part is ALSO their responsibility. However, both developing motivation and developing discipline are actually perfectly natural complements of good teaching, and (in theory at least) all teachers (even bad teachers) are better trained to do so than parents (and certainly better at it than bad parents). So I do consider schools to have the major responsibility here, especially because children now spend much more of their time at school than at home in their parents' company anyway.
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SnoochToTheBooch
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Of course it is. You send a kid to school for about 12 years minimum, 5 days a week, 7 hours a day, and if they can't teach a kid to the limit of their abilities then they have failed that child. That is what a school is supposed to do and they are given more than enough time to do it. The parents have a part to play too in keeping that child on the straight and narrow but they are not the ones spending that vast amount of time with the child.
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Mr M
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(Original post by SnoochToTheBooch)
The parents have a part to play too in keeping that child on the straight and narrow but they are not the ones spending that vast amount of time with the child.
Picks jaw off floor.
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Mr M
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(Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
OR - do schools even have the resources to be able to close that gap?
Are you aware of the Pupil Premium?
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