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    Im having trouble searching these topics can someone please help..:


    1) what property of lipids that causes them to form globules in water?


    2)Why do some stomach samples test negative for starch even though the meal the person ate may have contained a source of starch?


    3)If traces of cellulose were found in a stomach sample, what would happen to the cellulose? (because its not digestible is it for humans)


    4) Why would stomach samples test negative for alcohol?


    Any notes, links etc would be appreciated- thanks
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    (Original post by k_xx1)
    Im having trouble searching these topics can someone please help..:


    1) what property of lipids that causes them to form globules in water?


    2)Why do some stomach samples test negative for starch even though the meal the person ate may have contained a source of starch?


    3)If traces of cellulose were found in a stomach sample, what would happen to the cellulose? (because its not digestible is it for humans)


    4) Why would stomach samples test negative for alcohol?


    Any notes, links etc would be appreciated- thanks
    Well, these questions are too numerous. I might be able to hint, but you'll have to search out on that yourself

    1. The lipids normally in the stomach are in the form where they have a hydrophilic end and a hydrophobic "end". They aggregate in such a way that all the hydrophobic ends cluster in the centre. This is shown below:

    2. We have in the saliva a starch digesting enzyme called salivary amylase. This enzyme, although incapable of acting in the acidic pH of the stomach, might be "trapped" inside a food bolus and able to act on starch. Therefore you won't get starch testing positive here.
    3.Since cellulose won't be digested, you can imagine it being excreted in the feces. In fact, it will act as a hydrophilic bulking agent for the feces. It acts a major component of dietary fibers.
    4. Alcohol will go to the bloodstream as well as pass on to the intestines. It won't "stay" in your stomach to be digested.
    I haven't found any evidence linking up a stomach detoxification system for alcohol.
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    (Original post by Dynamo123)
    Well, these questions are too numerous. I might be able to hint, but you'll have to search out on that yourself

    1. The lipids normally in the stomach are in the form where they have a hydrophilic end and a hydrophobic "end". They aggregate in such a way that all the hydrophobic ends cluster in the centre. This is shown below:

    2. We have in the saliva a starch digesting enzyme called salivary amylase. This enzyme, although incapable of acting in the acidic pH of the stomach, might be "trapped" inside a food bolus and able to act on starch. Therefore you won't get starch testing positive here.
    3.Since cellulose won't be digested, you can imagine it being excreted in the feces. In fact, it will act as a hydrophilic bulking agent for the feces. It acts a major component of dietary fibers.
    4. Alcohol will go to the bloodstream as well as pass on to the intestines. It won't "stay" in your stomach to be digested.
    I haven't found any evidence linking up a stomach detoxification system for alcohol.
    Thanks so much! That's helped a bunch!
 
 
 
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