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harrydone
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Could anyone help me? I intend to do a law degree at Oxford and have a place to start there in 2004. i was wondering whether, after the law degree, i could, instead of doing an LPC, do an American Law conversion course!? What is the protocol for something like this?

Many Thanks Harry
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Howard
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(Original post by harrydone)
Could anyone help me? I intend to do a law degree at Oxford and have a place to start there in 2004. i was wondering whether, after the law degree, i could, instead of doing an LPC, do an American Law conversion course!? What is the protocol for something like this?

Many Thanks Harry
With the exception of California all other States require you complete an ABA (American Bar Association) approved Juris Doctor degree before taking the individual States Bar exam.

It's a very difficult and very expensive conversion process.

I have an LLb and live in Florida. For me to convert my LLb to a JD would take me at least 2 years (evening classes) and run me $20k a year.
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H&E
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(Original post by Howard)
With the exception of California all other States require you complete an ABA (American Bar Association) approved Juris Doctor degree before taking the individual States Bar exam.

It's a very difficult and very expensive conversion process.

I have an LLb and live in Florida. For me to convert my LLb to a JD would take me at least 2 years (evening classes) and run me $20k a year.
But, should you succeed, the rewards may be massive.
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Howard
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(Original post by H&E)
But, should you succeed, the rewards may be massive.
Not really. Only if you make Managing Partner somewhere. As a matter of fact I know quite a few attorneys that don't even practice law anymore. Too many of them. It's a myth that American attorneys print money. Most of the "ham n eggs" attorneys barely make a living. A good friend of mine recently took down her shingle, took a 2 week course, and became a realtor!
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H&E
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(Original post by Howard)
Not really. Only if you make Managing Partner somewhere. As a matter of fact I know quite a few attorneys that don't even practice law anymore. Too many of them. It's a myth that American attorneys print money. Most of the "ham n eggs" attorneys barely make a living. A good friend of mine recently took down her shingle, took a 2 week course, and became a realtor!
I suppose it depends on where you do your JD.

(Basically, I have half an eye on HLS)
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Howard
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(Original post by H&E)
I suppose it depends on where you do your JD.

(Basically, I have half an eye on HLS)
Well, I think we can say that a Harvard JD is probably worth more than one from Barry University in Orlando.
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H&E
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(Original post by Howard)
Well, I think we can say that a Harvard JD is probably worth more than one from Barry University in Orlando.
mm. costs a bit more, too.
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sashh
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Fairly sketchy on the details but a friend of mine has just finished the law conversion course and is intending to do the US bar exam, she said she can do it in this country - might be worth a google.
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Vitriol
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(Original post by H&E)
I suppose it depends on where you do your JD.

(Basically, I have half an eye on HLS)
HLS = teh best.

HLS = graduate bottom of your class and will probably still get interviews at White Shoe firms.

So there...
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Howard
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(Original post by sashh)
Fairly sketchy on the details but a friend of mine has just finished the law conversion course and is intending to do the US bar exam, she said she can do it in this country - might be worth a google.
There's no such thing as a US Bar exam. Each state has it's own Bar exam.
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Howard
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(Original post by Vitriol)
HLS = teh best.

HLS = graduate bottom of your class and will probably still get interviews at White Shoe firms.

So there...
Actually, Yale now has a higher ranking than HLS.
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Vitriol
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(Original post by Howard)
Actually, Yale now has a higher ranking than HLS.
Harvard, Yale and Stanford rotate all the time. I also don't think that they can be directly compared as Yale's intake is about 1/3 of Harvard's. Still, who cares? A degree from any of those and you can have any associate position you want.
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PDJM
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With a 3 year (non distance Learning) English common law degree, you will be eligible to take certain bar exams upon evaluation of your academic credentials, the New york Bar exam is one of the most common for English law graduates to take as the evaluation process is simpler and law degrees from many institutions including Cambridge, Oxford and London (Not external UofL, though) are automatically accepted. There is no need to take a JD to qualify as an attorney as an English law degree will suffice for many states; however you are likely to be less employable than your JD collegues, if you intended to practice in the US it is probably worth taking a US LLM (preferably from a good school) or a shortened 2 year JD (where you are given advanced standing due to your english law degree), either of which will increase the number of states you are eligible to sit the exam for. Qualification previously in England may also make you more atttractive to a global law firm in the US and will also mean you are approaching the age of a US law graduate- rather than being 3/4 years younger. It is possible to take new York bar review courses in England, either at Holborn College (London), or with CLT, home study courses are also available from US providers. The NY bar exam itself (unfortunately unlike the English QLTT- which may be examined in many global locations) is not yet available outside of NY. It is however possible to take a US LLM (from an ABA school) in London- see the University of Notre Dame's programme, which has reduced fees for EU students.
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Lawz-
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Technically you can sit the NY bar if you have been to a three year course at Oxbridge of UoL (maybe its expanding). ALternatively you can do an LLM in the US (say at HLS) and be allowed to take it.

However thats really not the point, without a JD most large firms will turn their noses up at you - simple fact.

However you can earn US Salaries in the UK - I have an offer from Cleary Gottlieb and they pay the same for their UK trainees as their US lawyers.

If you are going to oxford and want the big $£ that these firms offer, then get a first - join the Ox Union, and some societies, and make sure and portray yourself as a well-rounded individual. If you can do that you may well be able to earn the same money without having to leave the country.
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