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School in discrimination storm after demanding 16-year-old removes niqab watch

  • View Poll Results: Should students be allowed to wear a full face veil (or niqab) in school?
    Yes
    26
    28.89%
    No
    64
    71.11%

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    The school defended its decision as “very much an educational one” and said: “teachers need to see a student’s whole face in order to read the visual cues it provides. In addition, it is important for the safety and security of the school community to know who is on site, and to be able to see and identify individuals.”

    The state school has said that the student can not begin her a-level studies if she continues to wear her veil. The student previously was allowed to wear the niqab during her GCSE studies.

    You can read the full story here:

    The DoE state that schools can enforce their own uniform policy based on security, safety or learning.

    Do you think wearing a niqab presents a barrier to learning?

    If it is about prevention of "visual queues" what is the impact on the teacher pupil relationship in terms of rapport building?

    How does the school move on from this, is there a solution?
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    I agree with the school. As you say, schools have control over their own uniform policy. If I was a teacher, not only would I want to see my pupil's faces for the reasons stated, but I'd also feel somewhat insulted that someone in my class wants to hide her face from me and/or the other pupils.

    With regards to the petition to 'stop Islamophobia', that's ridiculous. If anything, allowing her to wear it would be discrimination, because you can bet someone wearing a balaclava would be told to take it off or go home (or anything else that completely covers the face, without the criminal connotations).
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    Covering your face is unacceptable in 21st century Britain. It's time to stop pandering to people constantly.

    If you want to have a conversation with someone, you can not cover your face.

    if you want to cover your face at home, go for it, but in public, if you expect to be spoken to, no.
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    i think if these rules are enforced it has to be universal. in my sixth form college there were always girls who wore the niqab.
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    I mean, of course you have to provide education for everyone, no matter how they behave, but as A Levels are voluntary and no more mandatory, she has to search for an institution by herself and can no more demand from other to tolerate her intolerance. I don't even get, why she wants to interact with others. A distance learning course would be much more suited to her needs. ( I mean honestly, I don't get the logic. She says it is her choice, yet, she does not accept to live with the consequences and as it is her choice and she is not forced, I don't see, why other should accomodate her special wishes.)

    (For me, if I knew that girl is forced by their family, it would an entirely different matter, because then, one should not make it even more difficult for her.)
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    It's completely up to the school what uniform policy it sets. What the policy was in the past is irrelevant to what it is now.

    If the student doesn't like it, she's perfectly welcome to move to another school where she can wear the niqab.
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    But if she removes her niqab then all the boys in the class will be overcome by lust and won't be able to control themselves!
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    (Original post by noobynoo)
    But if she removes her niqab then all the boys in the class will be overcome by lust and won't be able to control themselves!
    It's an all girls school. I dunno, I could see the point if there were boys present. But as it's not I'm conflicted on whether the school is right or wrong.
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    The niqaab is culturally divisive and segregates / isolates individuals who wear it in a Western country. (NB, the niqaab is not a requirement of Islam). For that very reason, the niqaab provokes the opposite intended effect by drawing attention to itself through the very nature of being outside a social norm'.

    The host country must both accommodate and integrate all cultures without prejudice. However, there is now a clash between the right of one persons free choice against that of groups who submit evidence that it undermines social cohesion, equality and security.

    On balance then, the privileges and freedoms offered by Western societies must come with a price tag of integration. For that reason alone, I view asking an individual to remove the niqaab in public places, as a perfectly reasonable and small price to pay for the trade.
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    Two reasons I agree with the school.

    1) Niqaab is not a religious requirement. It is a purely cultural tradition to wear it.
    2) The school has every right to enforce their own dresscode.
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    I don't think something being a religious or cultural requirement or tradition is a strong enough reason to excuse oneself from following rules that apply to others. Either the school should allow everyone to cover their faces, or no one - not just people who claim to want to for religious or cultural reasons.
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    There are always plenty of stories like this in September as the new school year starts. Many are along the lines of 'my child got sent home for wearing trainers' when the school has a clearly stated uniform policy which says 'no trainers'. The school has a right to create and enforce a uniform policy, any parent or student who doesnt want to conform to that set of rules should look for a different school. I fail to see how its complicated. If the policy is that students are not allowed to cover their face, then whether thats with a niqab, a balaclava, or a bunny rabbit mask is immaterial.
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    (Original post by lyrical_lie)
    It's an all girls school. I dunno, I could see the point if there were boys present. But as it's not I'm conflicted on whether the school is right or wrong.
    I'm an ex student of said school - the school is all female and the 6th form is mixed xx


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    (Original post by T1gga92)
    I'm an ex student of said school - the school is all female and the 6th form is mixed xx


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    Ah I see I see. A bit more sense as to why the student wants to wear one then.
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    Turn up in a balaclava or a motorcycle helmet or with a pair of tights over your face and there's gonna be trouble, I see no reason why this should get special treatment.
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    (Original post by SnoochToTheBooch)



    lol.
    c) all of the above
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    I really have nothing against the niqab in principle and generally, I think people ought to be able to wear what they want. However, I do agree with the school that it's inappropriate in a school environment. They've got a uniform that everyone else is expected to adhere to and, indeed, they probably signed a contract when they first went to the school agreeing to abide by the school's rules. Whilst I'm absolutely in favour of freedom of expression, I don't think that religion - regardless of whether it's a Muslim, Christian, Jew or anyone else - is a good enough excuse to bend those rules. I've got nothing against people wanting to express their religion but if it causes a genuine security risk - which I think it could do in this environment - then there have to be limitations.
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    I voted no.

    (Original post by SnoochToTheBooch)
    Turn up in a balaclava or a motorcycle helmet or with a pair of tights over your face and there's gonna be trouble, I see no reason why this should get special treatment.
    This, basically.
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    (Original post by tania<3)
    Two reasons I agree with the school.

    1) Niqaab is not a religious requirement. It is a purely cultural tradition to wear it.
    2) The school has every right to enforce their own dresscode.
    Niqaab is wajib :P I don't get why people say it's not a religious requirement, burka is cultural
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    Why would she think its ok to wear that at school?
 
 
 
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