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    yo yo yo

    epic thread.

    how do you get into flying planes as a hobby? looks so cool.
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    (Original post by Jeanlucpicard)
    If we're talking about fighters/ bombers though.... It has to be...

    Not a fighter/bomber, but still pretty damn impressive!

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    (Original post by ryan9900)
    Not a fighter/bomber, but still pretty damn impressive!

    :drool:
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    (Original post by swarly)
    yo yo yo

    epic thread.

    how do you get into flying planes as a hobby? looks so cool.
    Call up your local airfield and ask. My next type rating I'm going for is a CJ but I need to find somewhere that's less expensive than what I've seen so far.

    Starting on single engine Cessnas and Pipers are easy though, but I would suggest you find someone (such as myself) who already has a few ratings and some experience to take you through the first few lessons, to save you the cost of instructors for the first few parts - will save you money in the long run when you realise you only have a few hours of ground school and less instructed airtime to pay for when you're going for your PPL. If you pay for aircraft rental, we'll teach you the basics :P
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    (Original post by ryan9900)
    Not a fighter/bomber, but still pretty damn impressive!


    o.O A/C condensation? Or something a little more ominous?
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    Never seen so much beautiful engineering in a single thread!

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    because i'd totally be able to fly one of these... :broken:
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    Name:  747 020912.jpg
Views: 548
Size:  166.6 KB

    I took this while waiting to board the beauty to LAX
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    I wanna get my PPL but it's so expensive! I was thinking about starting on fixed wing microlights but they are pretty expensive too!
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    (Original post by XMaramena)
    o.O A/C condensation? Or something a little more ominous?
    SR71s leak like a sieve on the ground - the skin friction at their operating speed is so high the panels warp and seal up. The one at Duxford has the biggest drip tray I've ever seen under it!

    As far as civil aircraft go, the most interesting ones have rotating wings
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    Mine has to be the P-51. That plane's the reason I started aeromodelling a few years ago. Built a few gliders, started crafting a simple motor glider from some blueprints my teacher gave me (he promised I'd be making the P-51 after that one) but I moved to the UK in 2011 and never had the chance to craft one flying model myself as I hadn't found any aeromodelling school .
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    (Original post by Runninground)
    I wanna get my PPL but it's so expensive! I was thinking about starting on fixed wing microlights but they are pretty expensive too!
    Seriously: Join a gliding club. They are run as non-profit by club members.

    That's how I learned to fly.

    You pay a yearly subscription which works out at around £3 per week for under 25's. (Many clubs operate a dual pricing structure for students/young adults).

    There will normally be a one off joining fee of around £50 - £100.

    Launch costs vary but typically £7.50 per winch to around 1200' which will get you into a thermal and away you go.

    Aerotow is more expensive at around £25 to 2000' and £5/500' thereafter.

    Flying instruction is free with a qualified instructor and you only pay for the hire of the glider (charged per minute) at around £0.25p - £0.35p = £21/hour. That equates to as little as £30 per hours worth of flying including launch and all instruction!

    The club can do this because it is run by members on a volunteer basis. You get 3 winch launches or tows in return for you helping out for the day.

    Helping out means performing tasks such as launch controller, launch point hook ups, radio operator, rigging / de rigging, pre flight ground checks, cable retrieval, winch driver, glider retrieval etc.

    And when it's your turn to fly, others take over your allocated tasks while you do so.

    This makes learning to fly very cheap and accessible. Downside - it's weather dependent and while you are learning, the flights can be short if you don't get into a thermal relatively quickly.

    Typically, an average learner can go solo in around 60 - 80 launches. Training is highly structured and if you ask when will you go solo, you probably are not ready!

    Trial lessons are available at pretty much all clubs and most will have a self launched twin seat motor glider to get you comfortable with the aircraft handling in a few hours before progressing to winch and tow launches.

    Winch launches are something else. 0 to 60knots in 3 seconds and a climb angle of 50o+, release cable at the correct altitude and then silence save for the wind.

    After you become comfortable with basic handling, the remainder of your training (up to solo) will be pretty much all safety related. How to recognise stall warnings, how to never get yourself into a dangerous situation and if you do, the how to recover from it. That means you will learn and then have to show you are competent at recovering from cable breaks, stalls, mushing, stall turns, stalls leading to vertical spin dives, low height winch failures, landing across the runway/field, landing in short spaces, dealing with cross winds etc.

    After solo you will learn landing out in farmers fields, cross country distance flying. statutory air law, etc.

    Not for the faint hearted as you will fly performing +4g/-2g manoeuvres, very steep slow turns to deliberately stall the craft into a spin etc.

    Dual seaters means you are sitting up front and the view is simply breath taking with nothing in front of you. You feel part of the aircraft in a way that powered flight can never give you.
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    (Original post by uberteknik)
    Seriously: Join a gliding club. They are run as non-profit by club members.

    That's how I learned to fly.

    You pay a yearly subscription which works out at around £3 per week for under 25's. (Many clubs operate a dual pricing structure for students/young adults).

    There will normally be a one off joining fee of around £50 - £100.

    Launch costs vary but typically £7.50 per winch to around 1200' which will get you into a thermal and away you go.

    Aerotow is more expensive at around £25 to 2000' and £5/500' thereafter.

    Flying instruction is free with a qualified instructor and you only pay for the hire of the glider (charged per minute) at around £0.25p - £0.35p = £21/hour.

    The club can do this because it is run by members on a volunteer basis. You get 3 winch launches or tows in return for you helping out for the day.

    Helping out means performing tasks such as launch controller, launch point hook ups, radio operator, rigging / de rigging, pre flight ground checks, cable retrieval, winch driver, glider retrieval etc.

    And when it's your turn to fly, others take over your allocated tasks while you do so.

    This makes learning to fly very cheap and accessible. Downside - it's weather dependent and while you are learning, the flights can be short if you don't get into a thermal relatively quickly.

    Typically, an average learner can go solo in around 60 - 80 launches. Training is highly structured and if you ask when will you go solo, you probably are not ready!

    Trial lessons are available at pretty much all clubs and most will have a self launched twin seat motor glider to get you comfortable with the aircraft handling in a few hours before progressing to winch and tow launches.

    Winch launches are something else. 0 to 60knots in 3 seconds and a climb angle of 50o+, release cable at the correct altitude and then silence save for the wind.

    After you become comfortable with basic handling, the remainder of your training (up to solo) will be pretty much all safety related. How to recognise stall warnings, how to never get yourself into a dangerous situation and if you do, the how to recover from it. That means you will learn and then have to show you are competent at recovering from cable breaks, stalls, mushing, stall turns, stalls leading to vertical spin dives, low height winch failures, landing across the runway/field, landing in short spaces, dealing with cross winds etc.

    After solo you will learn landing out in farmers fields, cross country distance flying. statutory air law, etc.

    Not for the faint hearted as you will fly performing +4g/-2g manoeuvres, very steep slow turns to deliberately stall the craft into a spin etc.

    Dual seaters means you are sitting up front and the view is simply breath taking with nothing in front of you. You feel part of the aircraft in a way that powered flight can never give you.
    Wow thanks. I'd thought about this many times. I am in need of a new hobby right now so I may think about it again. I've got so many questions about it and don't know if I would enjoy it, but I guess I should just go for a day to find out.

    Would it be good to start now, just as winter is coming?

    I really like the idea of aerobatics in a glider...
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    (Original post by Runninground)
    Wow thanks. I'd thought about this many times. I am in need of a new hobby right now so I may think about it again. I've got so many questions about it and don't know if I would enjoy it, but I guess I should just go for a day to find out.

    Would it be good to start now, just as winter is coming?

    I really like the idea of aerobatics in a glider...
    You are unlikely to get any soaring days now (you may be lucky with one or two though) so flights will be short unless you go aerotow. The weather becomes very eratic from here on until next spring. But if you want to start now, these videos will give a good indication autumn flying including duration.

    You can build up your confidence and learn a lot of the safety stiff before the weather gets better in the spring and then you are well placed to learn proper soaring.



    Video is from the learners view.
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    (Original post by Runninground)
    Wow thanks. I'd thought about this many times. I am in need of a new hobby right now so I may think about it again. I've got so many questions about it and don't know if I would enjoy it, but I guess I should just go for a day to find out.

    Would it be good to start now, just as winter is coming?

    I really like the idea of aerobatics in a glider...
    And this:

    [/VIDEO]

    Video is from the pupils view as this is an trainee-instructors flight. Normally the trainee sits up front with the instructor behind.
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    (Original post by uberteknik)
    Seriously: Join a gliding club. They are run as non-profit by club members.

    That's how I learned to fly.

    You pay a yearly subscription which works out at around £3 per week for under 25's. (Many clubs operate a dual pricing structure for students/young adults).

    ...
    Additionally some glider clubs I looked at offered a fixed price to solo package, which looked a reasonably good deal (and easier to get your head around! It's something I'd like to do at some stage.
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    Additionally some glider clubs I looked at offered a fixed price to solo package, which looked a reasonably good deal (and easier to get your head around! It's something I'd like to do at some stage.
    Swings and roundabouts. If you are a slow learner and need lots of flights, it is a good option. If you want to get there in the shortest time and learn quickly, you may end up with a higher average cost by going down this route. Check with the club beforehand.
 
 
 
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