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Father's educational achievements strongest indicator of childrens' academic success watch

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    My dad left when I was a baby and I've since been brought up by my mother. None had any qualifications, yet I have 16 GCSEs, 7 AS' and currently doing A2s. Applying to university this year to study Economics.

    Your achievements are what you make of them and shouldn't be influenced by what parents have done.


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    Neither my mum nor dad went to university and I go to Cambridge. Guess I'm another anomaly again...
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    My parents are unsuccessful but they had high hopes for themselves. Because they couldn't achieve their dreams they pushed us (my siblings and I) to do our best.

    Sometimes we'll hardly have anything to eat but we'll ever never miss a lesson with our private tutors.

    Now I'm going to study Law at university (if I get in) and become the world's best barrister

    I think it's important to constantly remind your children that the sky is the limit. They can achieve anything they put their minds to. My parents did that and now their children are top in the year, winning scholarships... Etc (Not trying to boast btw).
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    (Original post by King of Evil)
    Neither my mum nor dad went to university and I go to Cambridge. Guess I'm another anomaly again...
    I'd imagine that TSR will be full of anomalies
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    I'd imagine that TSR will be full of anomalies
    Granted, but I take offence to the idea that my parents' achievements dictate my own.
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    (Original post by King of Evil)
    Granted, but I take offence to the idea that my parents' achievements dictate my own.
    Well, the study is just showing a correlation. But it's certainly something government should be paying attention to as it is worrying that that there's such a marked difference.
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    As with the above, both my parents left school at 16, and I'm going to Cambridge next week. Hooray for anomalies!

    edit: though they've always pushed me
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    (Original post by excal9)
    As with the above, both my parents left school at 16, and I'm going to Cambridge next week. Hooray for anomalies!

    edit: though they've always pushed me
    Congrats - are you excited?
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    Congrats - are you excited?
    Yeah thanks (I wasn't trying to brag) I think it might have something to do with parents pushing kids to try and do 'better' than they did.
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    (Original post by Exceptional)
    My dad left when I was a baby and I've since been brought up by my mother. None had any qualifications, yet I have 16 GCSEs, 7 AS' and currently doing A2s. Applying to university this year to study Economics.

    Your achievements are what you make of them and shouldn't be influenced by what parents have done.


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    Ladies and gentlemen, my boyfriend. *claps*
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    Why does it make sense?

    I was honestly a bit surprised that the difference between Mum/Dad was that significant.
    It is rarer to see a couple where the female is educated to a higher level than the male
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    Generally it isn't really what are the educational credentials of the parents that matter but it is the attitude the parents have towards education that matters most. I don't buy that idea that only those who were well educated in the past can pass on the same ethos to their children.
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    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    Why does it make sense?

    I was honestly a bit surprised that the difference between Mum/Dad was that significant.
    It is interesting. This kind of thing is why social scientists are still inclined to classify people's social class and other things by the father rather than both parents, there's apparently still a strong social tendency for the economic side of family life where both parents are present to be driven by the father more than the mother.

    Of course, like all statistics, there will also be a great many cases where this isn't so.
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    (Original post by Alfissti)
    Generally it isn't really what are the educational credentials of the parents that matter but it is the attitude the parents have towards education that matters most. I don't buy that idea that only those who were well educated in the past can pass on the same ethos to their children.
    I just tried looking it up and can't find it right now, but someone did a survey of Oxbridge students over 10 years and found a strong bias towards having had at least one parent or close relative who went there amongst successful applicants and that weighing heavier as a factor than things like parental wealth or type of school. I think it's much more common that you might think. Statistically, anyway.
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    Guess I beat the odds then.

    Dad = 1×C grade at CSE the rest Us

    Mum= mainly Cs at GCSE, with two Bs and a D

    Me = A* star student


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    Looks about right

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    Surprised dad is so much more, thought it would be an equal mix.

    My dad did alright (Durham and a PGCE) but we all wanted to achieve the same as my mum educationally.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    I just tried looking it up and can't find it right now, but someone did a survey of Oxbridge students over 10 years and found a strong bias towards having had at least one parent or close relative who went there amongst successful applicants and that weighing heavier as a factor than things like parental wealth or type of school. I think it's much more common that you might think. Statistically, anyway.
    That could easily be related to dispelling the offputting 'Brideshead revisited' mystique, or getting advice about gaming the selection process.

    I think he's right about parental attitude - you often get immigrant families where the parents are poorly educated but they correctly regard the much maligned British state education system as a gloden opportunity for their kids to advance. It's a well known cliche for a reason.
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    My Dad got a U in his Latin O-Level . . . And no one in my family has ever done A-Levels . . .

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    Although my parents never did a levels or gcses (their equilvents) my mum and dad have worked hard in the jobs, my dad was quite senior in the fire brigade and mum worked her way to hr in M&S and that's what I am hoping to do once I am a social worker work my way up the ladder.

    My dream just job would a mental health social worker with post graduate qualifications for sectioning


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