Why do schools not teach mnemonic techniques? Watch

llys
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For example the Method of Loci (Memory Palace) or Visualisation and Association.

These are very powerful tools to actively remember and connect learned knowledge and arrive at a deeper understanding of it. These techniques were in common use once, from Ancient Greece to the Middle Ages (before books became commonplace), but now hardly anyone even knows what a "Memory Palace" is.

I do think that memory matters less in the age of the internet, but I also think that you are still going to do better with a good memory than with a bad one.
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anosmianAcrimony
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Sherlock Holmes wouldn't be such an interesting guy if we could all do it.
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kkboyk
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(Original post by llys)
For example the Method of Loci (Memory Palace) or Visualisation and Association.

These are very powerful tools to actively remember and connect learned knowledge and arrive at a deeper understanding of it. These techniques were in common use once, from Ancient Greece to the Middle Ages (before books became commonplace), but now hardly anyone even knows what a "Memory Palace" is.

I do think that memory matters less in the age of the internet, but I also think that you are still going to do better with a good memory than with a bad one.
It doesn't work for some people.
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llys
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(Original post by kkboyk)
It doesn't work for some people.
That is probably true, but I actually think it would work for most people, and I'd take "most" over "some" as enough justification to teach it. You don't need an above average IQ - visual/spatial memory is quite powerful and can definitely be trained to surpass untrained "natural" memory capacity. That's also what this guy says: http://www.ted.com/talks/joshua_foer...do?language=en
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Kallisto
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(Original post by llys)
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Should it not up to everyone to create an own mnemonic? Furthermore I think that a good memory and a good knowledge is not enough to be successful. Instead of teaching a mnemonic, it would be better when teacher are teaching coherences and the importance of a syllabus in the every day life.
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llys
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(Original post by Kallisto)
Should it not up to everyone to create an own mnemonic? Furthermore I think that a good memory and a good knowledge is not enough to be successful. Instead of teaching a mnemonic, it would be better when teacher are teaching coherences and the importance of a syllabus in the every day life.
First they need to know that it is possible, and how to do it. I only learned about "pegging" by accident (and it caused my Geography grades to skyrocket - one of my least favourite subjects too). It would not even take much time. You can explain the principle of each technique in about ten minutes, and then make pupils practise with an example, so that they see the power of it. It's then up to them if they use such techniques on their own.

On the second point. Of course, but I think there is no "either / or" here. It is much easier to memorise things you understand, because you have learned them first. It will still make your life easier if you are able to recall these things you once understood quickly in the future.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by llys)
First they need to know that it is possible, and how to do it. I only learned about "pegging" by accident (and it caused my Geography grades to skyrocket - one of my least favourite subjects too). It would not even take much time. You can explain the principle of each technique in about ten minutes, and then make pupils practise with an example, so that they see the power of it. It's then up to them if they use such techniques on their own.

On the second point. Of course, but I think there is no "either / or" here. It is much easier to memorise things you understand, because you have learned them first. It will still make your life easier if you are able to recall these things you once understood quickly in the future.
As I see it, creativity is recquired to make mnemonics. Of course pupils can be given food for thought what would help to find an effective way to make it. But I am against that learning mnemonics should be compulsory for all, as every single pupil/student learns different. Me for instance, I find it stupid to learn something by creating mnemonics. I prefer to learn by cue cards by writing the question and the answer in own words.
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TritonSails
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(Original post by llys)
For example the Method of Loci (Memory Palace) or Visualisation and Association.

These are very powerful tools to actively remember and connect learned knowledge and arrive at a deeper understanding of it. These techniques were in common use once, from Ancient Greece to the Middle Ages (before books became commonplace), but now hardly anyone even knows what a "Memory Palace" is.

I do think that memory matters less in the age of the internet, but I also think that you are still going to do better with a good memory than with a bad one.
We do get taught mnemonic techniques. There's the classic ROY G. BIV style stuff, but we were taught about 'memory palaces' by several different subject teachers over the years too. Typically when exams were coming up. Everybody thinks they're the first one to rediscover the 'palace' as if it's some incredibly powerful and exotic technique but it's a pretty common idea. (Not one that I find particularly useful, mind.)
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llys
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(Original post by TritonSails)
We do get taught mnemonic techniques. There's the classic ROY G. BIV style stuff, but we were taught about 'memory palaces' by several different subject teachers over the years too. Typically when exams were coming up. Everybody thinks they're the first one to rediscover the 'palace' as if it's some incredibly powerful and exotic technique but it's a pretty common idea. (Not one that I find particularly useful, mind.)
That's great. Mnemonic techniques were never even mentioned at my school! Yeah I found pegging quicker / more useful, but I never had to memorise more than 10 items per list, and I think a memory palace is not really worth it for that, though I'm sure it can be very useful if you have to remember lots of different subject content (I never tried that because I didn't know about it at the time!). I think a lot of foreign language students can use visual techniques to remember words, with great success, but luckily words always came naturally to me without techniques (just through lots of reading). ("Luckily", because again, I didn't even know about visualisation-association at the time. By contrast, flashcards were quite widely recommended for FL, though curiously not for other subjects, although they can be just as useful there.)

(Original post by Kallisto)
As I see it, creativity is recquired to make mnemonics. Of course pupils can be given food for thought what would help to find an effective way to make it. But I am against that learning mnemonics should be compulsory for all, as every single pupil/student learns different. Me for instance, I find it stupid to learn something by creating mnemonics. I prefer to learn by cue cards by writing the question and the answer in own words.
Oh yeah, everyone is different, but as it really doesn't take long to teach the principles, I really think there should be one lesson per year or so where pupils learn that there are different techniques that can help them remember stuff. (Perhaps that would be more useful than playing games in the last week of term... ahem.) Apparently some schools actually do it. Flashcards should of course be mentioned as well, I found those very useful too! I think pupils mainly associate them with foreign languages, but they are great for any subject.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by llys)
(...)
Oh yeah, everyone is different, but as it really doesn't take long to teach the principles, I really think there should be one lesson per year or so where pupils learn that there are different techniques that can help them remember stuff. (Perhaps that would be more useful than playing games in the last week of term... ahem.) Apparently some schools actually do it. Flashcards should of course be mentioned as well, I found those very useful too! I think pupils mainly associate them with foreign languages, but they are great for any subject.
Me for instance use cue cards (or flashcards, don't know the common name as Eglish non-native-speaker), for terminologies in natural sciences. And of course they are used for foreign languages (English, Latin...:frown:). I can't remember me where mnemonic where used by myself. I think they are useful in history where events are denoted by time.
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