The Student Room Group

Low salaries for apprentices

I'm looking into apprenticeships as I'm leaving uni, I'm not expecting a massive salary by any means, but a lot are £100-150, which does seem very low. I'm looking at apprenticeships in marketing.

What sort of salary should I be expecting?

Scroll to see replies

You can't be an apprentice after leaving uni. The scheme is aimed at non graduates only, which is also why they have a minimum wage of £2.68 rather than the normal ones.


I just want to throw it in here, but damn straight Apprentices get a low wage. They're getting a great deal - they're getting a whole year of education and work experience that they can apply to a proper job. Most post apprentices earn more than the average graduate. It's only fair that they get a low wage, they're basically being paid to get the degree you're paying for.

As someone who has currently a few apprentices in my employment; they're an absolute pain. The first few months they're incredibly difficult to manage, often go AWOL thinking it's like school and they can 'bunk', don't understand basic work ethic and don't retain information at all. But the pay off is that they're paid low amounts and after the first painful few months you end up with a low end competent employee who is cheaper for your business. It's a mutually beneficial arrangement, but only because of the low wages.

:h:
(edited 9 years ago)
Original post by Hal.E.Lujah
You can't be an apprentice after leaving uni. The scheme is aimed at non graduates only, which is also why they have a minimum wage of £2.68 rather than the normal ones.


I just want to throw it in here, but damn straight Apprentices get a low wage. They're getting a great deal - they're getting a whole year of education and work experience that they can apply to a proper job. Most post apprentices earn more than the average graduate. It's only fair that they get a low wage, they're basically being paid to get the degree you're paying for.

As someone who has currently a few apprentices in my employment; they're an absolute pain. The first few months they're incredibly difficult to manage, often go AWOL thinking it's like school and they can 'bunk', don't understand basic work ethic and don't retain information at all. But the pay off is that they're paid low amounts and after the first painful few months you end up with a low end competent employee who is cheaper for your business. It's a mutually beneficial arrangement, but only because of the low wages.

:h:


Oh right, that's a really helpful thanks, and yeah that makes more sense as to why the wages are low, I won't be put off by that now.

Oh and when I said I'm leaving uni, I meant dropping out, so I'm not a graduate.
Original post by closeenemies
Oh right, that's a really helpful thanks, and yeah that makes more sense as to why the wages are low, I won't be put off by that now.

Oh and when I said I'm leaving uni, I meant dropping out, so I'm not a graduate.




Oh nice!


You might be ok then.


The way it usually works is that they hire someone for 1year. The first year, they have to pay you a min. of £2.68, and provide evidence that you're being trained and progressing. After the first year you're entitled to the min. wage that you'd get elsewhere, and you're usually free to apply to the role. Something I've seen often is IT apprentice, who spends the first year on the smaller wage package, gets an increase to £200 per month after the first 6months, and then at the end of the year applies to fairly reasonable £17k PA salaries.


If any questions let me know, I've had absolute ton of meetings with apprentices and people managing the schemes from both private places and local government, so my head is full of all the ins and outs :lol:
Reply 4
Original post by closeenemies
Oh right, that's a really helpful thanks, and yeah that makes more sense as to why the wages are low, I won't be put off by that now.

Oh and when I said I'm leaving uni, I meant dropping out, so I'm not a graduate.


Depends what year you're dropping out off, how much funding has been spent on you buy government, previous qualifications and age.

Posted from TSR Mobile
Original post by MrMango
Depends what year you're dropping out off, how much funding has been spent on you buy government, previous qualifications and age.

Posted from TSR Mobile


Only done first year, received no funding whatsoever for second year
Reply 6
Original post by closeenemies
Only done first year, received no funding whatsoever for second year


Then you will have to pay the government (SF) back.

Posted from TSR Mobile
Original post by MrMango
Then you will have to pay the government (SF) back.

Posted from TSR Mobile


As in my first year tuition fees? Yes I know
Reply 8
The Government are trying hard to promote half baked apprenticeships because they want to reduce the number of graduates but also make sure that those in the upper tiers of society are more likely to be the graduates. Dont fall for it and dont sign up for some crappy apprenticeship. Only sign up for high quality training with major blue chips.
Original post by Limpopo
The Government are trying hard to promote half baked apprenticeships because they want to reduce the number of graduates but also make sure that those in the upper tiers of society are more likely to be the graduates. Dont fall for it and dont sign up for some crappy apprenticeship. Only sign up for high quality training with major blue chips.


Typical Student Room elitist thing to say
Reply 10
I'm currently doing an apprenticeship straight out of 6th form at 14k a year which i think works our about £7-8 an hour.
Original post by closeenemies
Typical Student Room elitist thing to say


It wasnt intended. I am simply trying to protect people who might have gone to Uni but are thinking instead of signing up for an apprenticeship. All im saying is that i believe there is a hidden agenda and that students must ensure that they are signing up for a good quality apprenticeship and not half baked cheap labour. I once did an apprenticeship .It was old style,high quality and it stood me in good stead. I have earned good money on the back of it and never had a days unemployment. Not all new apprenticeships are the same.
Original post by Shieldsy
I'm currently doing an apprenticeship straight out of 6th form at 14k a year which i think works our about £7-8 an hour.

Well that sounds like a good start. Could you tell us more about it and what field is it in ?
Original post by closeenemies
I'm looking into apprenticeships as I'm leaving uni, I'm not expecting a massive salary by any means, but a lot are £100-150, which does seem very low. I'm looking at apprenticeships in marketing.

What sort of salary should I be expecting?

For Marketing you won't get much tbh max. 200 a week. The best apprenticeship schemes i've seen though are Financial services and Accounting (Big Four) apprenticeships, you can expect to earn £250-£500 a week straight away and the learning providers for these companies Kaplan and BPP (the best schemes have mainly Kaplan). I've also seen a government apprenticeship that pays 28-30K (in London) and that was a permanent role..
(edited 9 years ago)
Bit confused at the people comparing wages of after graduates to apprentices wages. If want to compare objectively, most apprentices earn more than most graduates after their paid development. And considering mosy are paid £150 a week or so, they're already earning the equivalent of an 18k salary anyway whilst they learn. Really struggling to see why anyone would advise against an apprenticeship. Everyone and their dog has a degree these days.
Reply 15
Original post by Limpopo
Well that sounds like a good start. Could you tell us more about it and what field is it in ?


It's a Cilex legal apprenticeship which gets you qualified as a chartered legal executive at the end, or you can split off and become a solicitor or barrister. I think I got it through vision apprenticeships it's at Clyde and Co LLP
Original post by Shieldsy
It's a Cilex legal apprenticeship which gets you qualified as a chartered legal executive at the end, or you can split off and become a solicitor or barrister. I think I got it through vision apprenticeships it's at Clyde and Co LLP

Fab..well that certainly sounds like a good start,,good luck with that.
Original post by Prince Kael'thas
sounds like you're abusing them tbh



Why? By offering them a paid career boost? Welcome to grown up life. Opportunities aren't free. Its hard working with untrained people and putting the extra effort into training them.

Compare it to university. Lower job prospects, and YOU PAY. Please explain how that isn't a crummy situation?
Original post by Hal.E.Lujah
You can't be an apprentice after leaving uni. The scheme is aimed at non graduates only, which is also why they have a minimum wage of £2.68 rather than the normal ones.


I just want to throw it in here, but damn straight Apprentices get a low wage. They're getting a great deal - they're getting a whole year of education and work experience that they can apply to a proper job. Most post apprentices earn more than the average graduate. It's only fair that they get a low wage, they're basically being paid to get the degree you're paying for.

As someone who has currently a few apprentices in my employment; they're an absolute pain. The first few months they're incredibly difficult to manage, often go AWOL thinking it's like school and they can 'bunk', don't understand basic work ethic and don't retain information at all. But the pay off is that they're paid low amounts and after the first painful few months you end up with a low end competent employee who is cheaper for your business. It's a mutually beneficial arrangement, but only because of the low wages.

:h:


Original post by Hal.E.Lujah
You can't be an apprentice after leaving uni. The scheme is aimed at non graduates only, which is also why they have a minimum wage of £2.68 rather than the normal ones.


I just want to throw it in here, but damn straight Apprentices get a low wage. They're getting a great deal - they're getting a whole year of education and work experience that they can apply to a proper job. Most post apprentices earn more than the average graduate. It's only fair that they get a low wage, they're basically being paid to get the degree you're paying for.

As someone who has currently a few apprentices in my employment; they're an absolute pain. The first few months they're incredibly difficult to manage, often go AWOL thinking it's like school and they can 'bunk', don't understand basic work ethic and don't retain information at all. But the pay off is that they're paid low amounts and after the first painful few months you end up with a low end competent employee who is cheaper for your business. It's a mutually beneficial arrangement, but only because of the low wages.

:h:[instead


I can see where you're coming from but placements are kinda like that ie: you're employed for a year and you get experience though you're usually paid more

I don't know of any companies who were re-badging placements as apprenticeships instead

Though I guess it depends on the industry as well thay you're going for. An apprentice is preferable to saybaj unpaid intern - the fashion industry and to a lesser extent law, are absolutely brutal. AFAIK there's a lot of unpaid interns at large fashion companies

Part of that reason is people simply accepting zero pay at all

When not living with your parents, a placement wage is a more "live-able" wage than an apprenticeship

I guess its better for small companies to have apprenticeships as well - I have heard of one company which is basically made up entirely of placement students though...

I guess though with placements you're not learning "from scratch" so there's less work for the employer to do

I mean we were specifically told not to do unpaid placements
(edited 9 years ago)
Original post by de_monies
I can see where you're coming from but placements are kinda like that ie: you're employed for a year and you get experience though you're usually paid more

I don't know of any companies who were re-badging placements as apprenticeships instead

Though I guess it depends on the industry as well thay you're going for. An apprentice is preferable to saybaj unpaid intern - the fashion industry and to a lesser extent law, are absolutely brutal. AFAIK there's a lot of unpaid interns at large fashion companies

Part of that reason is people simply accepting zero pay at all

When not living with your parents, a placement wage is a more "live-able" wage than an apprenticeship

I guess its better for small companies to have apprenticeships as well - I have heard of one company which is basically made up entirely of placement students though...

I guess though with placements you're not learning "from scratch" so there's less work for the employer to do

I mean we were specifically told not to do unpaid placements



Placements will be for higher qualified, potentially graduates. The apprenticeships we're discussing are 16-17 year olds mainly, often in their first employment. :h:

You know me, I'd never take an unpaid intern :u:

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending