What happens to the structure of a metal when it is being shaped?

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LauraLovesOtters
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What happens to the structure of a metal when it is being shaped?
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Chlorophile
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You've got to remember that a metal is basically a lattice of positive ions in a continuous sea of negative electrons that act like a kind of 'glue'. In an ionic or covalent compound, you have to actually break bonds in order to change the position of atoms, which requires a lot of energy. In a metal, since the bonds aren't directional (the positive ions are electrostatically attracted to a continuous sea of electrons) you don't have to actually break any bonds in order to move metal ions. The fact that pure metals have a very similar crystalline structure helps as layers can simply slide over eachother.
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charco
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(Original post by LauraLovesOtters)
What happens to the structure of a metal when it is being shaped?
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... and to add to the above...

... the bonds are 'non-directional' so you can move the metal ions around and the forces of attraction still hold the structure together.
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LauraLovesOtters
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(Original post by charco)
... and to add to the above...

... the bonds are 'non-directional' so you can move the metal ions around and the forces of attraction still hold the structure together.
THank you! Please could you help me with this question? "How does the particular bonding of metals explain their electrical conductivity?"
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It's_Ailie
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(Original post by LauraLovesOtters)
THank you! Please could you help me with this question? "How does the particular bonding of metals explain their electrical conductivity?"
Metallic bonding is a giant lattice where the electrons are delocalised. The negative sea of electrons flows freely throughout the structure and it is these free electrons can carry an electrical charge.


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