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    I'm aware most people have the ambition to become a pilot since they were very young, I thought I did at one point but then went off it in favour of getting a degree. However I'm now 3 out of 4 years through my degree and really regret not pursuing the pilot path.

    I was in the ATC for a while, flew planes etc and loved it so I know it's for me. My degree was a bit too intense for me to have the time to join the UAS. All I've had time to do is play badminton a few times a week so my CV is lacking. I feel I stand a very good chance with aptitude, my maths isn't bad, I have 20:20 vision, quick reactions and I'm fit and healthy.

    I know there's more than aptitude they look for though. So my question, do I stand a chance of being accepted into pilot training?
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    Even if there is a 1% chance of success, which i'm sure there is even more than that, if it's your dream, surely you should give it a go and give it your all you have nothing to lose!
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    You miss 100% of the shots you don't take. How badly do you want to do it? That will tell you exactly how big a chance you have.
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    You stand no better or worse a chance than anyone else. If you put the work in, do the research, apply yourself, etc, then there's no reason why you can't make it to and then through selection.

    (Original post by Rinkk)
    My degree was a bit too intense for me to have the time to join the UAS.
    Don't use this line at any point through selection.
    I did an engineering degree and never had less than 35 hrs a week of scheduled tutorials, lectures and labs and I managed the UAS for 3 years on top of 2 other uni clubs and the student council. The majority of my friends did similar and most were doing STEM subjects. We also had at least 7 medical students going through.
    University workload is not a reason not to join the UAS or any other university organisation. The whole point about those places is that they schedule themselves around university do that you'd never have to choose one or the other.
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    (Original post by Rinkk)
    I'm aware most people have the ambition to become a pilot since they were very young, I thought I did at one point but then went off it in favour of getting a degree. However I'm now 3 out of 4 years through my degree and really regret not pursuing the pilot path.

    I was in the ATC for a while, flew planes etc and loved it so I know it's for me. My degree was a bit too intense for me to have the time to join the UAS. All I've had time to do is play badminton a few times a week so my CV is lacking. I feel I stand a very good chance with aptitude, my maths isn't bad, I have 20:20 vision, quick reactions and I'm fit and healthy.

    I know there's more than aptitude they look for though. So my question, do I stand a chance of being accepted into pilot training?
    Your story is somewhat flawed as most pilots have degrees!

    You have no more or less chance than anyone else. It's as simple as that. Not everyone knows that they want to do it and not everyone gears their life towards it from the start. Just get fit, get up to speed with world events and form an opinion on them then apply for selection.

    Your phraseology concerns me slightly: "do I stand a chance of being accepted into pilot training?"

    You don't get accepted into pilot training. You're applying to be an Officer in the RAF/ Navy or an Officer or Soldier in the Army whose job is to fly aircraft. The ordering of that sentence is important since that's the way round the selection centres will see it too.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    You stand no better or worse a chance than anyone else. If you put the work in, do the research, apply yourself, etc, then there's no reason why you can't make it to and then through selection.



    Don't use this line at any point through selection.
    I did an engineering degree and never had less than 35 hrs a week of scheduled tutorials, lectures and labs and I managed the UAS for 3 years on top of 2 other uni clubs and the student council. The majority of my friends did similar and most were doing STEM subjects. We also had at least 7 medical students going through.
    University workload is not a reason not to join the UAS or any other university organisation. The whole point about those places is that they schedule themselves around university do that you'd never have to choose one or the other.
    I'm on a year abroad right now, but it would surely help if I joined the UAS when I'm back in England on my final year?
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    (Original post by Rinkk)
    I'm on a year abroad right now, but it would surely help if I joined the UAS when I'm back in England on my final year?
    Each UAS has their own way of working, but in 99% certain they won't let let you join if you only have a year left. Can't hurt to look though, and even just saying that you did look when your course allowed you to would look better during interviews.
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    I've only seen single years given to new bursars or a very exceptional one or two (or joining in 3rd year of a Masters and then not doing the 4th year!).

    As for the original post, there's only one way to find out, and you're in a lucky position that you can apply. The RAF missed out on some very good potential when the doors were shut.

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    Hi Rinkk,

    You have the same chance as anyone else provided you put the work in. The RAF looks for determined, motivated and well rounded people. Try to make yourself stand out from the crowd. If you can do some flying then do it. Things like UAS or air cadets where you can complete flying scholarships will help you. Are you someone who has gone out of their way to gain experience, volunteering, did things at school, took on responsibility. Remember you are an officer first then a pilot. It's the complete package.

    They're not expecting you to be the finished article by any means, but show you have the willingness, the drive and the potential to do well in IOT and then as an Officer and a Pilot.

    Any questions let me know.

    Jack
 
 
 
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