Primary school introduces unisex toilets to "prevent transphobia"

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thesabbath
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Angry parents have complained after a primary school introduced unisex toilets in a bid to 'prevent transphobia'.

Pupils were shocked to discover they had to share the 'gender neutral' toilets at the start of the school year, sparking concerns from parents.

Many say their children do not want to use facilities split with the opposite sex and it makes them feel 'uncomfortable'.

Harbour Primary School in Newhaven, East Sussex, has defended the move, which it says is about 'preventing transphobia'.

There are around 500 pupils at the school for three to 11-year-olds.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...ansphobia.html
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BitWindy
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Are they going to let animals run wild in the playground to make the Otherkin feel at home?
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qasidb
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There are better ways to prevent transphobia than having unisex toilets.
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SnoochToTheBooch
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Aside from how ****ing pathetic this is, don't they already have disabled toilets that are unisex?
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Juichiro
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(Original post by thesabbath)
Angry parents have complained after a primary school introduced unisex toilets in a bid to 'prevent transphobia'.

Pupils were shocked to discover they had to share the 'gender neutral' toilets at the start of the school year, sparking concerns from parents.

Many say their children do not want to use facilities split with the opposite sex and it makes them feel 'uncomfortable'.

Harbour Primary School in Newhaven, East Sussex, has defended the move, which it says is about 'preventing transphobia'.

There are around 500 pupils at the school for three to 11-year-olds.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...ansphobia.html
The school should have made 3 types of toilets to prevent this predictable reaction: male toilets, female toilets and unisex toilets.
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Clip
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A lot of schools have open plan and GN toilets as anti-bullying measures.
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BitWindy
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(Original post by Clip)
A lot of schools have open plan and GN toilets as anti-bullying measures.
How are they anti-bullying measures?
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BarackObama
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Huh, weird. Although I have heard the following logic before: we don't segregate toilets based on race any more, so why would we segregate toilets based on gender?

Don't even know tbh.
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(Original post by BitWindy)
How are they anti-bullying measures?
Basically, there is a trend in school architecture and timetabling to eliminate opportunity for physical bullying. Take away any locations in the school where bullying can take place - if toilets are open plan (i.e. there are communal highly visible sink troughs, with only enclosed gender-neutral toilet cubicles) then the rationale is that everyone can see what is going on at all times. Similarly, there are a lot of new schools with a shopping centre-type look with central open atria where everything is continually visible. Combine this with staggered timetabling so that not that many students are on breaks at the same time and shorten breaks and lunches - and the thinking is that there is no opportunity for bullying.

Not saying I completely agree with it - just that's the thinking.
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thesabbath
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(Original post by Juichiro)
The school should have made 3 types of toilets to prevent this predictable reaction: male toilets, female toilets and unisex toilets.
Doesn't it strike you as rather disturbing that a school for 3-11 year olds is concerning itself with radical gender theory and the elimination of a recently invented PC-condemned mental construct which for obvious reasons isn't going to be on children's radar?
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Joinedup
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(Original post by BitWindy)
How are they anti-bullying measures?
Increased traffic - decreased loitering


linking it to transphobia seems a bit bonkers though and tbh it sounds like something whinging idiot parents have deliberately misconstrued in order to get the papers interested.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by BitWindy)
How are they anti-bullying measures?
It is to do with the social dynamics of bullying. Bullying requires the victim to be isolated from those who might come to his or her aid. Bystanders tend not to intervene when they perceive that they too will be victimised. Most school bullying involves perpetrators and victims of the same gender.

Members of the opposite gender are less likely to tolerate the annexation of toilet facilities as private space by bullies for the purposes of intimidation or violence.
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gr8wizard10
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this is feminism gone too far
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white boy
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(Original post by SnoochToTheBooch)
Aside from how ****ing pathetic this is, don't they already have disabled toilets that are unisex?
exactly. transgenders should use the disabled toilets.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Anonynous)
this is feminism gone too far
Please would you explain what this has to do with feminism at all?
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gr8wizard10
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Please would you explain what this has to do with feminism at all?
no i wudnt like explain
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thesabbath
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(Original post by Joinedup)
Increased traffic - decreased loitering


linking it to transphobia seems a bit bonkers though and tbh it sounds like something whinging idiot parents have deliberately misconstrued in order to get the papers interested.
The article continues:

Headteacher Christine Terrey said the decision to include single sex toilets in their new building had been taken by East Sussex County Council. She has invited parents to a meeting on 'transphobia', which will include a discussion about the toilets.

Mrs Terrey said: "The toilets are all in cubicles and they all lock. We just want all our children to be able to use the toilets.
"We no longer have urinals because they were quite unpopular with the boys."

And a letter to parents said: "We want all the children in our school to feel safe and be happy.

"We also want our families to feel informed about how to effectively support transgender and gender questioning by their children, preventing any transphobia at the school."
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by thesabbath)
The article continues:

Angry parents have complained after a primary school introduced unisex toilets in a bid to 'prevent transphobia'.

Pupils were shocked to discover they had to share the 'gender neutral' toilets at the start of the school year, sparking concerns from parents.

Many say their children do not want to use facilities split with the opposite sex and it makes them feel 'uncomfortable'.

Harbour Primary School in Newhaven, East Sussex, has defended the move, which it says is about 'preventing transphobia'.

There are around 500 pupils at the school for three to 11-year-olds.
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One concerned mother said her seven-year-old does not feel 'comfortable' using the toilets.

She said: "I know of several parents who have raised complaints and they have now invited us to a meeting about transgender equality.

"This was just introduced from the start of term and no one told us before. There are seven-year-old girls using the same toilets as 11-year-old boys.

"My daughter has said she doesn't feel comfortable about it. Although we are all up for equality we feel this is not allowing our children to choose.

"A lot of our children don't want to use toilets of the opposite sex."

Headteacher Christine Terrey said the decision to include single sex toilets in their new building had been taken by East Sussex County Council.

She has invited parents to a meeting on 'transphobia', which will include a discussion about the toilets.

Mrs Terrey said: "The toilets are all in cubicles and they all lock. We just want all our children to be able to use the toilets.

"We no longer have urinals because they were quite unpopular with the boys."

And a letter to parents said: "We want all the children in our school to feel safe and be happy.

"We also want our families to feel informed about how to effectively support transgender and gender questioning by their children, preventing any transphobia at the school."

East Sussex County Council said it chose to install unisex toilets because they are better for 'hygiene, maintenance and pupil behaviour'.

A spokesman said: "As part of the rebuilding work a decision was taken to install toilets which could be used by boys or girls, with lockable cubicles.

"Unisex toilet blocks are considered preferable in terms of hygiene, maintenance and pupil behaviour.

"We feel this kind of toilet block, which complies with all national guidelines, is an appropriate solution for children of primary school age.

"We are not aware of any cases of children being reluctant to use the new toilets.

"On the contrary, the feedback we have received from the vast majority of parents, children and staff has been overwhelmingly positive.

"As an authority we feel it's important to provide a safe, welcoming environment in our schools for all pupils."


One father, who asked to remain anonymous, said: "I am disappointed that we were not consulted.

"I understand the rationale for doing it but I am disappointed with how the changes have happened."

Marcus Clark, 36, and Greta Clark, 33, said their two children do not mind sharing.

Mrs Clark, from Newhaven, East Sussex, said: "If it doesn't bother the kids, it doesn't bother us. For anyone below 11, it isn't an issue."

Mr Clark added: "I think it's more than reasonable for kids to share. It's change isn't it? Some people don't like it but we are OK with it."
Read the parts in bold. The people who made the decision have not referred to transphobia at all,
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thesabbath
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Read the parts in bold. The people who made the decision have not referred to transphobia at all,
So why is the school's headmistress making repeated references to "transphobia", "transgender" and "gender questioning"? I find that more concerning than it happening at council level actually. At least you expect it from the state bureaucrats.
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Juichiro
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(Original post by thesabbath)
Doesn't it strike you as rather disturbing that a school for 3-11 year olds is concerning itself with radical gender theory and the elimination of a recently invented PC-condemned mental construct which for obvious reasons isn't going to be on children's radar?
Let's go step by step.

1. Doesn't it strike you as rather disturbing that a school for 3-11 year olds is concerning itself with radical gender theory?

Tackling transphobia is not a "radical gender theory"...unless you are transphobic yourself, in that case it would make sense to say that you find transgender disturbing in the same way that a racist would find racial equality disturbing.

2. Doesn't it strike you as rather disturbing that a school for 3-11 year olds is concerning itself with the elimination of a recently invented PC-condemned mental construct?

What do you mean by a "PC-condemned mental construct"? Transgender? The school is trying to tackle transphobia, whether the approach taken is the best one is one thing and whether the school should tackle transphobia (which seems to be your focus) is another thing.

3. " isn't going to be on children's radar". That is irrelevant. Racism and sexism are also not in your child's radar...unless he is on the "weaker side" of racism (ethnic minorities) or sexism (females).
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