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    Hi

    I just Started Uni and I know its going to be rough road ahead
    Uni so far feels very different from sixth form as i found lectures can be brief or can go off topic
    can someone give me some tips on how to study for uni
    is it similar to preparations for a levels ?
    (if someone from their second or third year at uni can answer i would really appreciate it )
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    It's helpful I think to think of lectures as an introduction to a topic. You won't get everything you need to know from them, they're just there to introduce you to some key ideas/names/theories, whatever it is. To back up that introduction, you then have to do some reading in order to understand more fully the topic. Often this reading is indicated - a chapter in a textbook, or you'll have been given a reading list (usually divided up by topic), so choose a few things from there to read, perhaps starting off with a book that positions itself as an introductory book. The more you can read, both of textbook-type material and other sources (other books, or journal articles), the better you will grasp the topics.

    To back that up then, you'll probably have seminars/tutorials in smaller groups. You might be set a problem sheet, or in humanities/social science-y courses you may be asked to read some things and then discuss, usually related to the lecture topics. Use these sessions as opportunities both to ask questions and to give expression to what you think of the material, if that makes sense.

    When it comes to revision then, past papers (if your university publishes them) are usually very helpful to give you a sense of the kinds of questions asked and the topics to focus on.

    University is very different to school. You're expected to be much more independent: no one will make you do the reading, but if you don't it will be you that suffers as you fall more & more behind. People often say that university is a lot less structured than school; I don't agree. What is true is that you have to create your own routine of when you work, and stick to it; then you have a structure and you will get through everything you need to do.
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    Third year and I'm still not entirely convinced I know but hey ho.

    First thing I'd suggest is analyse your course handbook/s and then the exam papers.They should tell both the topics you'll need to know, how they'll ask you it and what kind of approach they're looking for. If you don't have to learn everything don't; picking a few topics and go in depth is better than a shallow knowledge of everything or will at least save the stress.

    I'm not sure how science works but humanities etc.. at least it's not like A level in that they expect you to do the leg work. Rarely will there be a a nice and convenient syllabus rather you have to gather the information your self and hope it's going to be relevant. In that respect go off the lecture topics and if you don't feel like you know everything read to fill in the gaps.

    Also get to know your professors/markers. It's a lot more subjective than A level and although big things should be double marked I've found my department are very allied on ideas. Find out what kind of structure essays they like, their favorite topics. At the very least it'll be the kind of thing more likely to come in exams/essays. (again humanities/social sciences).

    All that said, depending on what your university is like it'll be staged. My first year you could mostly go off lectures and be alright. Reading ahead is helpful and good habit to learn but not nesscarily important at this stage. Always do a little extra reading and find your own things. Even one or two extra opinions not on the readings (but still relevant). By third year for me feels like lectures are more about consolidation than learning which is done prior/around but you develop that over time.

    End of day though is time. You can't avoid putting in the hours at some point if you want to do well. I'd highly recommend making good sets of notes you can use later as you go along. For example history, I'd note down a topic, then key facts within it and then the debates with the major academics/opinions listed under each one plus my own opinion at the end. You'll develop your own style subject to your own course and personal preference. It'll save so much time to learn it now, I cannot tell you how many hours I wasted and regret not having done this properly the first few exam periods because you end up spending time having to reread.

    Biggest things to focus on right now I'd say would be working on your ability to stay relevant (again not sure for sciences?). It's very easy to wander and try and through everything in if you panic and tripped me up so many times to begin with as did it a lot of people I know. Also analytical skills, they don't appreciate narration and it's a skill worth learning now to make later easier. These are two things I wish I'd focused on in first year and if you've ot them down great but if not nows the time to master them.

    Most of all enjoy it. First year should be your easiest work wise (and usually doesn't count to your final classification?). I'd focus on honing your skills for later rather than getting them perfect now and making the most of uni life.

    Also feedback, get as much as you possibly can even if this mean badgering people. For all the advice people can try and offer feedback is the only time where you will get specificaly tailored advice on how to improve from the people giving you your grades.

    Well this turned into an essay good luck OP, and on a some none study related get as much experience as you can now and make the most of your career service because graduation comes round faaaast.

    Eta: One reading this back, I realize it's really badly written but I can't be bothered editing so I'm sorry for that.
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    (Original post by gutenberg)
    It's helpful I think to think of lectures as an introduction to a topic. You won't get everything you need to know from them, they're just there to introduce you to some key ideas/names/theories, whatever it is. To back up that introduction, you then have to do some reading in order to understand more fully the topic. Often this reading is indicated - a chapter in a textbook, or you'll have been given a reading list (usually divided up by topic), so choose a few things from there to read, perhaps starting off with a book that positions itself as an introductory book. The more you can read, both of textbook-type material and other sources (other books, or journal articles), the better you will grasp the topics.

    To back that up then, you'll probably have seminars/tutorials in smaller groups. You might be set a problem sheet, or in humanities/social science-y courses you may be asked to read some things and then discuss, usually related to the lecture topics. Use these sessions as opportunities both to ask questions and to give expression to what you think of the material, if that makes sense.

    When it comes to revision then, past papers (if your university publishes them) are usually very helpful to give you a sense of the kinds of questions asked and the topics to focus on.

    University is very different to school. You're expected to be much more independent: no one will make you do the reading, but if you don't it will be you that suffers as you fall more & more behind. People often say that university is a lot less structured than school; I don't agree. What is true is that you have to create your own routine of when you work, and stick to it; then you have a structure and you will get through everything you need to do.
    Thanks
    that cleared up some things for me Books have been recommended to me during the last few days I'm going to see if I can find them in the library at uni if i can't then probably buy used copies from ebay as they can be very expensive I think u are right i made notes during last week but it wasn't very much Im guessing i have to find my own exercises to do
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    (Original post by Chihiro94)
    Third year and I'm still not entirely convinced I know but hey ho.

    First thing I'd suggest is analyse your course handbook/s and then the exam papers.They should tell both the topics you'll need to know, how they'll ask you it and what kind of approach they're looking for. If you don't have to learn everything don't; picking a few topics and go in depth is better than a shallow knowledge of everything or will at least save the stress.

    I'm not sure how science works but humanities etc.. at least it's not like A level in that they expect you to do the leg work. Rarely will there be a a nice and convenient syllabus rather you have to gather the information your self and hope it's going to be relevant. In that respect go off the lecture topics and if you don't feel like you know everything read to fill in the gaps.

    Also get to know your professors/markers. It's a lot more subjective than A level and although big things should be double marked I've found my department are very allied on ideas. Find out what kind of structure essays they like, their favorite topics. At the very least it'll be the kind of thing more likely to come in exams/essays. (again humanities/social sciences).

    All that said, depending on what your university is like it'll be staged. My first year you could mostly go off lectures and be alright. Reading ahead is helpful and good habit to learn but not nesscarily important at this stage. Always do a little extra reading and find your own things. Even one or two extra opinions not on the readings (but still relevant). By third year for me feels like lectures are more about consolidation than learning which is done prior/around but you develop that over time.

    End of day though is time. You can't avoid putting in the hours at some point if you want to do well. I'd highly recommend making good sets of notes you can use later as you go along. For example history, I'd note down a topic, then key facts within it and then the debates with the major academics/opinions listed under each one plus my own opinion at the end. You'll develop your own style subject to your own course and personal preference. It'll save so much time to learn it now, I cannot tell you how many hours I wasted and regret not having done this properly the first few exam periods because you end up spending time having to reread.

    Biggest things to focus on right now I'd say would be working on your ability to stay relevant (again not sure for sciences?). It's very easy to wander and try and through everything in if you panic and tripped me up so many times to begin with as did it a lot of people I know. Also analytical skills, they don't appreciate narration and it's a skill worth learning now to make later easier. These are two things I wish I'd focused on in first year and if you've ot them down great but if not nows the time to master them.

    Most of all enjoy it. First year should be your easiest work wise (and usually doesn't count to your final classification?). I'd focus on honing your skills for later rather than getting them perfect now and making the most of uni life.

    Also feedback, get as much as you possibly can even if this mean badgering people. For all the advice people can try and offer feedback is the only time where you will get specificaly tailored advice on how to improve from the people giving you your grades.

    Well this turned into an essay good luck OP, and on a some none study related get as much experience as you can now and make the most of your career service because graduation comes round faaaast.

    Eta: One reading this back, I realize it's really badly written but I can't be bothered editing so I'm sorry for that.
    Thanks your help is appreciated this is going to be a lot different for me as I'm used to working from class textbooks back from school I'm going to try my best on making notes probably the hardest bit i found usually i liked doing lots of questions repeatedly until I'm confident. The reading I'm going have to get used to
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    Avoid TSR

    Avoid porn

    Go to bed early

    Eat well, exercise

    Learn to say No to people dragging you to come out

    Counter-intuitively, leave work at home

    Avoid the Relationships forum
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    (Original post by Riku)
    Avoid TSR

    Avoid porn

    Go to bed early

    Eat well, exercise

    Learn to say No to people dragging you to come out

    Counter-intuitively, leave work at home

    Avoid the Relationships forum
    wow:eek:
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    (Original post by Pikachu94)
    wow:eek:
    lol what's so weird about this
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    (Original post by Pikachu94)
    Thanks your help is appreciated this is going to be a lot different for me as I'm used to working from class textbooks back from school I'm going to try my best on making notes probably the hardest bit i found usually i liked doing lots of questions repeatedly until I'm confident. The reading I'm going have to get used to
    No worries Part of the point of university is its new and different. I was in exactly the same position when I started as was nowhere near as proactive as your being now.

    Just remember you don't have to be perfect straight away. As long as you work at it and put the effort in you'll find you'll get used to the reading. It's like a mindset, I actually find textbooks strange now. You'll also work out how you work best which is a good thing. You're there to stretch yourself and part of that isn't just your knowledge of the subject but your skills in how you approach it.

    I'd suggest youtubing Oxfordfinalist. Someone suggested him to me a while ago and I've found him to be really helpful. He has some good videos on how to read and note take effectively which you can adapt. I wouldn't worry so much about the apparent Oxford workload part of it but when I need motivation I find it useful to remind myself that I'm going to up against graduates who can produce that amount. For some reason it really makes focus? I would recommend finding some kind of long term goal though to get you through it. It can be a slog at times, so having a end result to focus on really helps.
 
 
 

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