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    Could someone give me a brief overview of atomic spectroscopy (with the emission and absorption spectrum) and how this relates back to the elements being examined.

    Thanks
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    Sample is put into spectrometer, electrons fired at sample remove sample's electrons and turn sample's atoms into positive ions (ionisation), then the positive ions are accelerated through an electric firld (or potential difference) and then through a curved magnetic field. Different masses and charges arrive at different places and a detector ar the end gathers the results and plots them on a mass/charge vs abundance graph.
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    (Original post by mik1a)
    Sample is put into spectrometer, electrons fired at sample remove sample's electrons and turn sample's atoms into positive ions (ionisation), then the positive ions are accelerated through an electric firld (or potential difference) and then through a curved magnetic field. Different masses and charges arrive at different places and a detector ar the end gathers the results and plots them on a mass/charge vs abundance graph.
    Isn't that mass spectroscopy?

    I'm after atomic spectroscopy; emission and absorption of energy.

    But thanks for taking the interesting and replying
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    I'd never heard of atomic spectroscopy before so I assumed they were the same thing.
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    (Original post by LS.)
    Isn't that mass spectroscopy?

    I'm after atomic spectroscopy; emission and absorption of energy.

    But thanks for taking the interesting and replying
    Do you mean photoelectron spectroscopy?

    Ben
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    (Original post by mik1a)
    I'd never heard of atomic spectroscopy before so I assumed they were the same thing.
    Ah. it's ok.

    Basically with atomic spectroscopy - an atomic spectrum is formed (lines on a background) by subjecting a sample to certain conditions. It relies on atoms being excited, emitting or absorbing energy.
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    (Original post by Ben.S.)
    Do you mean photoelectron spectroscopy?

    Ben
    I'm doing my open book at the moment, and it refers to the process as 'atomic spectroscopy' - but yes, the particle thory of light is involved (makes me thankful I do physics too!)
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    (Original post by LS.)
    Could someone give me a brief overview of atomic spectroscopy (with the emission and absorption spectrum) and how this relates back to the elements being examined.

    Thanks
    The emission spectrum is found by exciting the sample causing the electrons to jump to a higher energy level. When they fall back into the base level, they emit a characteristic frequency of photon equal in energy to the difference between the 2 shells the electron fell from and into.
    The absorbtion spectrum has the same physics except all bands of radiation are passed through a sample and it absorbs only the photons of the correct energy level corrseponding to the electron jumps.

    In the case of emission, bands can be seen when passed through a spectromoter whereas for absorbtion, those bands are missing from the spectrum.
    The bands are characteristic to each element and so this method can be used to identify the composition of samples, for example stars - you can find both their composition and speed (by measuring red shift)
    Hope this helps
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    Thanks very much Golden Maverick
 
 
 

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