It's World Mental Health Day!!! Do you think schizophrenia is misunderstood? Watch

Queen Cersei
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Today is about raising awareness for those living with schizophrenia. Studies show that 50% of people who are diagnosed with schizophrenia cannot gain access to adequate treatment.

If you have stories about schizophrenia please share them in this post and feel free to discuss the questions below.

What do you understand schizophrenia to mean?

How can we as a society change the way people diagnosed with schizophrenia receive treatment?

How can we reduce the stigma surrounding the condition?

Some of our TSR users have contributed their stories/ creative pieces to help raise awareness of the condition and these can be read here.

One of our users has offered to answer your questions about schizoaffective disorder in an AMA thread which can be found here!

Hopefully by discussing issues such as schizophrenia we can work to raise awareness and affect the improvement of treatment through getting our voices heard.
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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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I think the media hysteria around schizophrenia means people have got the wrong idea about it. Plus it's also often conflated (wrongly) with MPD or DID as it's known in this country (Multiple Personality Disorder/Dissociative Identity Disorder) :sigh:
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Aj12
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Yeah I don't really understand it if I'm honest. When I think of it I imagine someone who hears voices?
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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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(Original post by Aj12)
Yeah I don't really understand it if I'm honest. When I think of it I imagine someone who hears voices?
Hallucinations are usually a part of it yes, though it may not necessarily be hearing voices: could be tactile hallucinations (sensing/feeling something that isn't there) or visual (seeing something that's not there). Voices does seem to be a common one though :yes:
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Aj12
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(Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
Hallucinations are usually a part of it yes, though it may not necessarily be hearing voices: could be tactile hallucinations (sensing/feeling something that isn't there) or visual (seeing something that's not there). Voices does seem to be a common one though :yes:
How well does treatment work?
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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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(Original post by Aj12)
How well does treatment work?

Really varies from case to case! I think I'm right in saying (I don't suffer from schizophrenia, but a related condition instead) that treatment options are usually a combination of medication and therapy.

Medication can work wonders but there's a lot of experimenting that goes on. I heard of one person who had to experiment (with his psychiatrist) for close to 10 years before they found an effective medication combination :sadnod:

As for therapy, the waiting lists are so ridiculously long that you might end up dead before you make the top of the list
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Aj12
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(Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
Really varies from case to case! I think I'm right in saying (I don't suffer from schizophrenia, but a related condition instead) that treatment options are usually a combination of medication and therapy.

Medication can work wonders but there's a lot of experimenting that goes on. I heard of one person who had to experiment (with his psychiatrist) for close to 10 years before they found an effective medication combination :sadnod:

As for therapy, the waiting lists are so ridiculously long that you might end up dead before you make the top of the list
Oh geez that is bad. Seems to be a similar story with mental health as a whole. We just don't seem to be that great at treating it.
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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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(Original post by Aj12)
Oh geez that is bad. Seems to be a similar story with mental health as a whole. We just don't seem to be that great at treating it.
Yeah tiz very sad. I do think with the right treatment, schizophrenia can become more manageable. It doesn't go away overnight - or perhaps ever! - but for many people who have been fortunate enough, you can live alongside other people fine, have jobs that aren't too stressful, etc
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superwolf
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(Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
As for therapy, the waiting lists are so ridiculously long that you might end up dead before you make the top of the list
Got an email from Mind the other day that you might be interested in:


Today, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg announced the introduction, for the very first time, of mental health waiting time standards.

For us, this is an important landmark in our campaign for better access to talking therapies. Your support and campaigning has helped make this happen and we’d like to say thank you very, very much.

The announcement is part of a five year plan, which sets out how mental health services will be treated equally to physical health services by 2020.

From April 2015, 75 per cent of people referred for talking therapies through the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme will start their treatment within six weeks. Everyone else will wait no longer than 18 weeks. People experiencing psychosis for the first time will start treatment within two weeks of referral, which brings it in line with cancer treatments.

Just last month we found that 40 per cent of people have to wait over three months just to find out if they can get talking therapies and shockingly, 1 in 10 people have to wait more than a year. This isn’t good enough and it’s why you’ve been helping us campaign on this for years. It’s also why waiting time standards is one of the six campaign commitments we’ve been calling for in our Mind Manifesto.

Today’s announcement is a welcome first step and acknowledges the unfair imbalance that has long existed between physical and mental health services. We now need to see these important ambitions translate into tangible improvements for everyone trying to access the help they need. If you want to continue to fight for better mental health for everyone, take a look at what else we'll be campaigning on over the coming months.

What today shows is that we’re stronger together and we can make things happen.

Thank you,

Paul Farmer

Chief Executive, Mind
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Interrobang
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(Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
I think the media hysteria around schizophrenia means people have got the wrong idea about it. Plus it's also often conflated (wrongly) with MPD or DID as it's known in this country (Multiple Personality Disorder/Dissociative Identity Disorder) :sigh:
That is a very common misconception unfortunately :sadnod:. I guess another related one would be that people with schizophrenia (or any mental health issue) cannot lead a relatively normal life. Yes, some will not be able to work/leave the house/be in a hospital, but a number of people with issues can.
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Arkasia
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(Original post by Queen Cersei)
Today is about raising awareness for those living with schizophrenia. Studies show that 50% of people who are diagnosed with schizophrenia cannot gain access to adequate treatment.

If you have stories about schizophrenia please share them in this post and feel free to discuss the questions below.

What do you understand schizophrenia to mean?

How can we as a society change the way people diagnosed with schizophrenia receive treatment?

How can we reduce the stigma surrounding the condition?

Some of our TSR users have contributed their stories/ creative pieces to help raise awareness of the condition and these can be read here.

One of our users has offered to answer your questions about schizoaffective disorder in an AMA thread which can be found here!

Hopefully by discussing issues such as schizophrenia we can work to raise awareness and affect the improvement of treatment through getting our voices heard.
The poem seems to have been pasted incorrectly on that article, with some of the lines being joined together.

Should be like this:

Spoiler:
Show


Auburn leaves lie rotting on the pathway,
Fading thoughts of some forgotten epoch,
Crunching beneath my feet. Crunching. CRUNCHING.
The sound is stuck in my mind - kill yourself -
I glance around, no-one there. Not again.

Panicked wisps of air dart away from me,
Seeking refuge in the haunted shadows,
No solace, no safety, no end in sight,
Only oblivion - you're pathetic -
Startled strangers stare, I blink, no-one there.

Why here? Why now? Helplessly fumbling,
I grope in the dark for something certain,
Pulling out a plastic bottle I pour
Three small white soldiers into the abyss.
Things are back to normal. Perhaps.


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The_Lonely_Goatherd
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(Original post by superwolf)
Got an email from Mind the other day that you might be interested in:


Today, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg announced the introduction, for the very first time, of mental health waiting time standards.

For us, this is an important landmark in our campaign for better access to talking therapies. Your support and campaigning has helped make this happen and we’d like to say thank you very, very much.

The announcement is part of a five year plan, which sets out how mental health services will be treated equally to physical health services by 2020.

From April 2015, 75 per cent of people referred for talking therapies through the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme will start their treatment within six weeks. Everyone else will wait no longer than 18 weeks. People experiencing psychosis for the first time will start treatment within two weeks of referral, which brings it in line with cancer treatments.

Just last month we found that 40 per cent of people have to wait over three months just to find out if they can get talking therapies and shockingly, 1 in 10 people have to wait more than a year. This isn’t good enough and it’s why you’ve been helping us campaign on this for years. It’s also why waiting time standards is one of the six campaign commitments we’ve been calling for in our Mind Manifesto.

Today’s announcement is a welcome first step and acknowledges the unfair imbalance that has long existed between physical and mental health services. We now need to see these important ambitions translate into tangible improvements for everyone trying to access the help they need. If you want to continue to fight for better mental health for everyone, take a look at what else we'll be campaigning on over the coming months.

What today shows is that we’re stronger together and we can make things happen.

Thank you,

Paul Farmer

Chief Executive, Mind
Argh, can't rep this. Thanks for linking me to it though :love:

(Original post by *Interrobang*)
That is a very common misconception unfortunately :sadnod:. I guess another related one would be that people with schizophrenia (or any mental health issue) cannot lead a relatively normal life. Yes, some will not be able to work/leave the house/be in a hospital, but a number of people with issues can.
Exactly! Like, OK so I have a differnet disorder, but if you met me for the first time (or even second, fourth, fifth, eight time) most likely you would not be able to tell at all that I have a mental health problem :nah:
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Queen Cersei
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(Original post by Arkasia)
The poem seems to have been pasted incorrectly on that article, with some of the lines being joined together.

Should be like this:

Spoiler:
Show


Auburn leaves lie rotting on the pathway,
Fading thoughts of some forgotten epoch,
Crunching beneath my feet. Crunching. CRUNCHING.
The sound is stuck in my mind - kill yourself -
I glance around, no-one there. Not again.

Panicked wisps of air dart away from me,
Seeking refuge in the haunted shadows,
No solace, no safety, no end in sight,
Only oblivion - you're pathetic -
Startled strangers stare, I blink, no-one there.

Why here? Why now? Helplessly fumbling,
I grope in the dark for something certain,
Pulling out a plastic bottle I pour
Three small white soldiers into the abyss.
Things are back to normal. Perhaps.


Oh no! I am so sorry our system is a bit tricky for formatting, I will get right on it on amending this.
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Arkasia
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(Original post by Queen Cersei)
Oh no! I am so sorry our system is a bit tricky for formatting, I will get right on it on amending this.
No worries, it's understandable considering the amount of work you have put in to this.
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Queen Cersei
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(Original post by Arkasia)
No worries, it's understandable considering the amount of work you have put in to this.

I am so sorry, it has been quite busy getting everything ready! Please could you have a look at it now? I think I figured out the problem, our system was recognising the dashes as code and pulling up the sentences after it. Please let me know if there are any other amends needed but it seems to match the original now!
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drbluebox
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The main concerns I have go back to when i was at scool and some girls on the bus wanted to be mental heatlh nurses(and some girls in my class) they all talked about people with mental health problems as freaks and weirdos and not normal, yet my parents worked in a mental health drop in for years and 9 out of 10 people you could not tell had any problems, the 1 out of 10 we noticed was this woman who would be fine one minute then have a temper tantrum and be banned from local bars for a few months.

It shocks me how in the media, if you get something like a serial killer in a film they are always mentally ill so it just increases the idea that people with mental health problems are dangerous, I know people who are friendly and talk about equality for everyone such as people with learning difficulties but the same person would act like someone with mental heatlh problems is a "ticking time bomb" because they believed the media

People think that mental health means someone with mental health issues is automatically a higher risk of being dangerous therefore all people with issues should be locked away with the justification that since the ones on the news doing stuff like killing or attacking innocent people are mentally ill, it means all mentally ill people are capable of it.
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geeeeorgia
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It is the negative stigma attached to schizophrenia and mental illness in general e.g. people see schizophrenics as 'crazy' with violent tendencies - a potential murderer. Again, if someone is extremely depressed, others may view this as someone who is weak and seeking attention. In reality this is not the case, people are too presumptuous and are easily judgemental when it comes to mental illness.

Younger people should be more educated on mental illness in school. Perhaps in the last two years of secondary school. I was never educated on any such thing during school until I took up Psychology as an A-Level. Evidently more awareness needs to be raised about this topic!
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miser
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Yeah, I think schizophrenia is often misunderstood. My other personality disagrees though.
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Queen Cersei
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(Original post by geeeeorgia)
It is the negative stigma attached to schizophrenia and mental illness in general e.g. people see schizophrenics as 'crazy' with violent tendencies - a potential murderer. Again, if someone is extremely depressed, others may view this as someone who is weak and seeking attention. In reality this is not the case, people are too presumptuous and are easily judgemental when it comes to mental illness.

Younger people should be more educated on mental illness in school. Perhaps in the last two years of secondary school. I was never educated on any such thing during school until I took up Psychology as an A-Level. Evidently more awareness needs to be raised about this topic!
I agree, I was never taught anything about mental health. Not only should we be taught about mental illnesses but how to actually maintain our mental wellbeing!
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Arkasia
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(Original post by Queen Cersei)
I am so sorry, it has been quite busy getting everything ready! Please could you have a look at it now? I think I figured out the problem, our system was recognising the dashes as code and pulling up the sentences after it. Please let me know if there are any other amends needed but it seems to match the original now!
No need to apologize! It's still the same for me
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