Burmajan
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Hey there
I am unsure as to whether i want to study Pediatric nursing at Uni straight away. This might just be me chickening out because i am having to chose my career at age 18 and no one else seems to be doing the same thing, i just don't want to make the wrong decision and regret it. A friend of mine who has done it has been putting me off with the idea that you get no holidays and have no time to be sociable and go out and meet new friends.
I am quite a sociable person and am scared that if i do do nursing i will resent it even though i will love the course. So do you think i should do something else first (like bio-medical sciences) and then apply to do nursing after??? eeek really hope you guys can help me out
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deviant182
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(Original post by Burmajan)
Hey there
I am unsure as to whether i want to study Pediatric nursing at Uni straight away. This might just be me chickening out because i am having to chose my career at age 18 and no one else seems to be doing the same thing, i just don't want to make the wrong decision and regret it. A friend of mine who has done it has been putting me off with the idea that you get no holidays and have no time to be sociable and go out and meet new friends.
I am quite a sociable person and am scared that if i do do nursing i will resent it even though i will love the course. So do you think i should do something else first (like bio-medical sciences) and then apply to do nursing after??? eeek really hope you guys can help me out
If you want to do nursing. do it. Don't let so called friends put you off.
Nursing you get holidays in the same as any other job, usually 28 days per year. This increases the longer you are in the job in most places.
There are plenty of young nurses because generally nursing is considered a vocation not an occupation. It is something you enjoy and feel worthwhile doing.
no one can say definitely do or do not do it. But if you feel like you want to and you've looked at all possibilities and angles of it then you can make that decision.
So best of luck with it.

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CosmicJay
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Hey there,

I'm not a children's nurse, or planning to study that course - I'm a support worker on a mental health unit and want to go and do MH nursing, I'm also a graduate and wanted to give my two cents.

The first thing that comes to mind is why not apply? If you get to summer next year and feel your not ready to start the training then you could always defer your place for a year. I'd also advise against doing a different degree first (I think you mentioned that) - all that means is when you come round to doing your nurse training you won't get student finance and (apart from tuition fees) won't get much in the way of funding - I've had to save around £15,000 to do my nurse training and will have to work all three years of the course.

The last thing I'd mention is something I've heard from current students, nurses at work - but also a nursing lecturer I was talking to recently - at the moment we get good funding from the NHS (especially for tuition fees), no one know's how long that's going to continue.

I hope you do apply to do your training - it's a fab career to be involved in and something everyone I know loves - but whatever you decide, good luck!
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Happy_Holidays
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If you're not sure why not take a gap year? Spend a year as an Au Pare or working with kids. Take time to decide if it's something you want to do. You don't have to go to uni at 18. There seems to be so much pressure now to decide what you want to do at 18, then go to uni to do it. It then leads to people either dropping out of courses or ending up doing something totally different. Don't fell pressured to go to uni straight after college. Taking a year or two out would probably make you a more attractive candidate anyway.


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ScottMcCall
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I'm a graduate (in social sciences) doing Mental Health Nursing, and I honestly think if you want to be a nurse now I would apply. You do get young people on the course who socialize together and have a university experience. Holidays aren't everything, I found them pretty boring. You also walk into a decently paid career much faster than most students so it has it's advantages!

As it is I am about £20.000+ in debt (not the worst kind of debt, but still) before I decided I wanted to be a nurse, when I was 18 I never would of wanted to be a nurse. I only decided after my degree I wanted to be one. I don't regret my first degree it was a brilliant experience. But if I wanted to do nursing at the time I wouldn't of done the degree.

(Original post by CosmicJay)
Hey there,

I'm not a children's nurse, or planning to study that course - I'm a support worker on a mental health unit and want to go and do MH nursing, I'm also a graduate and wanted to give my two cents.

The first thing that comes to mind is why not apply? If you get to summer next year and feel your not ready to start the training then you could always defer your place for a year. I'd also advise against doing a different degree first (I think you mentioned that) - all that means is when you come round to doing your nurse training you won't get student finance and (apart from tuition fees) won't get much in the way of funding - I've had to save around £15,000 to do my nurse training and will have to work all three years of the course.

The last thing I'd mention is something I've heard from current students, nurses at work - but also a nursing lecturer I was talking to recently - at the moment we get good funding from the NHS (especially for tuition fees), no one know's how long that's going to continue.

I hope you do apply to do your training - it's a fab career to be involved in and something everyone I know loves - but whatever you decide, good luck!
I've just started MH Nursing as a graduate and I get the same amount of funding as people who are doing their first degree. I get a reduced student loan from SLC which all students get, and I get fees paid for by NHS Bursaries and an income assessed bursary. (not very much, but this is to do with my parents having a higher income)

Many people on my course are graduates, it's all funded. Health care professions (and some others I think) are generally exceptions to the rule of no second degree funding. Unless you do post graduate entry nursing in which you won't get the reduced student loan but you will get an nhs income assessed bursary.
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CosmicJay
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No I'm sorry I have to disagree with you there. Students on their first degree are entitled to significant support from SFE, even if most of it is means tested. That support can make a huge difference - something which you are only entitled to on a first degree.


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deviant182
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(Original post by CosmicJay)
No I'm sorry I have to disagree with you there. Students on their first degree are entitled to significant support from SFE, even if most of it is means tested. That support can make a huge difference - something which you are only entitled to on a first degree.


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Okay I think people are getting confused here.
For a first degree you will get full funding. However, if your first degree is NHS funded you don't. The NHS pay for your tuition fees and student finance give you a reduced maintenance loan. This all varies depending on where you are ordinarily resident and where you will attend university. As you get a bursary but in northern Ireland this is a fixed amount. In England this is means tested.
If you want to do a different degree first then do a NHS degree afterwards then you will more than likely still get funding as it is an NHS degree and separate from ordinary degrees.
A lot of people do one degree then choose a different career path down the line. And they still get funding.
Whatever your decision make sure it is the right one for you.

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ScottMcCall
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(Original post by CosmicJay)
No I'm sorry I have to disagree with you there. Students on their first degree are entitled to significant support from SFE, even if most of it is means tested. That support can make a huge difference - something which you are only entitled to on a first degree.


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I've started my course and I'm getting the same funding as the people who are doing their first degree. Every student who gets an NHS Bursary only gets a reduced student maintenance loan, this is topped up by the NHS Bursary system. Graduates can apply for both as health degrees are exempt from the second degree rules. I get £1700 from SFE (Outside of London, living with parents) as well as my means tested NHS bursary.

For my first degree I was means assessed by SFE. But NHS bursary courses are treated differently, so any NHS (first degree or second degree) student can only get the reduced rate. If you are a first time doing a nursing course you will be funded for the BSc regardless of graduate status.

The only time it's different is if you do the PGDip in which case you aren't entitled to a maintenance loan. But you can get a means tested NHS Bursary
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