ILoveKDramas
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Why is attachment theory important to consider for those delivering foster care?
What factors affect care givers abilities to respond to children’s needs?
Why is it important for a child to have secure attachments and a stable and responsive care giver?
What was the ‘strange situation study’ and why was it important in helping psychologists understand attachment?
What are the four attachment groups proposed by Ainsworth et al (1978) and Main and Solomon (1986)?
What are mental models?
How best can a foster parent work with a child with negative prior attachment experiences to help them develop secure and healthy attachments?
Critique the attachment theory and its relevance in the 21st century?
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ILoveKDramas
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Please help me, this work has to be handed in soon and I am so STUCK
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ILoveKDramas
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Anyone Please help.
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ILoveKDramas
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Okay it seems to me, I am getting no help
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madmax1234
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I can briefly answer these questions for you, bear with me. I got A* for psychology
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madmax1234
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  • Why is attachment theory important to consider for those delivering foster care?

    secure attachments are considered desirable in western societies. Insecure attachments are associated with affectionless psychopathy, low IQ (developmental retardation) and other issues. Thus it is important for the psychological wellbeing of the child that they should receive the best care, and a healthy secure attachment should form.

    What factors affect care givers abilities to respond to children’s needs?

    This is called sensitive responsiveness (responding to a child's normal, built in attention seeking behaviours such as crying etc.). Im not sure what this question is specifically asking for but Bowlby said that the continual presence of the parent is required for a successful, secure attachment to develop. This is done by the mother attending to the childs social releasers e.g crying, smiling etc (search social releasers on google). Factors that can affect this attachment and the responsiveness could be that the mother may be ignorant to the child, long working hours and even sending the child to daycare (disruption caused to the attachment)

    Why is it important for a child to have secure attachments and a stable and responsive care giver?

    Attending to the social releasers strenghtens the attachment between carer and child. Secure attachments, as mentioned in first answer are desirable for the above mentioned reasons. Many studies have shown that secure attachments lead to better empathy in children, less anti social behaviour and less risk of turning to crime.

    What was the ‘strange situation study’ and why was it important in helping psychologists understand attachment?

    The strange situation was a standardised method of assessing attachment types systematically (in a laboratory setting). It involved the mother leaving and entering a controlled room full of toys and the child on several occasions, as well as a stranger entering and leaving. It was initally observed through a one way mirror, and different behaviours were assessed at each stage (search for the 8 stages of strange situation).
    the behaviours are: reunion behaviour, willingness to explore, stranger anxiety and one other one which i have forgotten sorry.

    What are the four attachment groups proposed by Ainsworth et al (1978) and Main and Solomon (1986)?
    Secure
    Insecure avoidant
    Insecure resistant
    (these are the only three I have learnt, you could research more into these behaviours and also figure out the last one using online resources)

    What are mental models?

    the internal working model is a mental model which acts as a prototype for future relationships. It carries info. regarding the first attachment you had with your primary carer. Bowlby believes that patterns of behaviour can be sent down generations through the formation of IWM's

    How best can a foster parent work with a child with negative prior attachment experiences to help them develop secure and healthy attachments?

    I haven't looked into this topic thoroughly but it may be useful if you look into deprivation and how daycare centres work to ensure attachments are not broken. Also look into Koluchovas study of Czech twins, this is a more severe case but it can give you pointers on how foster parents can work to bring up kids with negative prior experiences. Also can look at rutters study of romanian orphanages

    Critique the attachment theory and its relevance in the 21st century?

    Ok theres lots to talk about here. talk about attachment types are not globally consistent. e.g grossman and grossman found that in germany the main attachment type is insecure avoidant this is cos independence was encouraged and maintaining close proximity is frowned upon. Also look at evaluations of Strange situation as a method, as some points may overlap with attachments. e.g. strange situation cannot apply to israeli kibbutz tribes because they are a close knit community, in japan mothers rarely leave their child so they develop insecure resistant attachments.

    Hope this helps, let me know if it does.

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ILoveKDramas
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(Original post by madmax1234)
  • Why is attachment theory important to consider for those delivering foster care?

    secure attachments are considered desirable in western societies. Insecure attachments are associated with affectionless psychopathy, low IQ (developmental retardation) and other issues. Thus it is important for the psychological wellbeing of the child that they should receive the best care, and a healthy secure attachment should form.

    What factors affect care givers abilities to respond to children’s needs?

    This is called sensitive responsiveness (responding to a child's normal, built in attention seeking behaviours such as crying etc.). Im not sure what this question is specifically asking for but Bowlby said that the continual presence of the parent is required for a successful, secure attachment to develop. This is done by the mother attending to the childs social releasers e.g crying, smiling etc (search social releasers on google). Factors that can affect this attachment and the responsiveness could be that the mother may be ignorant to the child, long working hours and even sending the child to daycare (disruption caused to the attachment)

    Why is it important for a child to have secure attachments and a stable and responsive care giver?

    Attending to the social releasers strenghtens the attachment between carer and child. Secure attachments, as mentioned in first answer are desirable for the above mentioned reasons. Many studies have shown that secure attachments lead to better empathy in children, less anti social behaviour and less risk of turning to crime.

    What was the ‘strange situation study’ and why was it important in helping psychologists understand attachment?

    The strange situation was a standardised method of assessing attachment types systematically (in a laboratory setting). It involved the mother leaving and entering a controlled room full of toys and the child on several occasions, as well as a stranger entering and leaving. It was initally observed through a one way mirror, and different behaviours were assessed at each stage (search for the 8 stages of strange situation).
    the behaviours are: reunion behaviour, willingness to explore, stranger anxiety and one other one which i have forgotten sorry.

    What are the four attachment groups proposed by Ainsworth et al (1978) and Main and Solomon (1986)?
    Secure
    Insecure avoidant
    Insecure resistant
    (these are the only three I have learnt, you could research more into these behaviours and also figure out the last one using online resources)

    What are mental models?

    the internal working model is a mental model which acts as a prototype for future relationships. It carries info. regarding the first attachment you had with your primary carer. Bowlby believes that patterns of behaviour can be sent down generations through the formation of IWM's

    How best can a foster parent work with a child with negative prior attachment experiences to help them develop secure and healthy attachments?

    I haven't looked into this topic thoroughly but it may be useful if you look into deprivation and how daycare centres work to ensure attachments are not broken. Also look into Koluchovas study of Czech twins, this is a more severe case but it can give you pointers on how foster parents can work to bring up kids with negative prior experiences. Also can look at rutters study of romanian orphanages

    Critique the attachment theory and its relevance in the 21st century?

    Ok theres lots to talk about here. talk about attachment types are not globally consistent. e.g grossman and grossman found that in germany the main attachment type is insecure avoidant this is cos independence was encouraged and maintaining close proximity is frowned upon. Also look at evaluations of Strange situation as a method, as some points may overlap with attachments. e.g. strange situation cannot apply to israeli kibbutz tribes because they are a close knit community, in japan mothers rarely leave their child so they develop insecure resistant attachments.

    Hope this helps, let me know if it does.
OMG wow first I will congratulate you on your AMAZING achievement A*.

Next I really want to say thank you, I have these questions to do for university and have never done attachment theory so you should have seen my face, even though I have heard a little about 1 or 2 theorists you have mentioned. You seriously made me HAPPY, THANK YOU again.

:hugs:

You are AWESOME
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ILoveKDramas
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Hello, I have done some of the questions but I just cannot seem to grasp.

What factors affect care givers abilities to respond to children’s needs? (4 marks)

For this question do you look at things like cultural, emotional development or abuse

Why is it important for a child to have secure attachments and a stable and responsive care giver? (4marks)
Attachments between infants and caregivers form even if this caregiver is not sensitive and responsive in social interactions with them. This has important implications. Infants cannot exit unpredictable or insensitive caregiving relationships. Instead they must manage themselves as best they can within such relationships.

Is it something like that caus I am soo confused.

How best can a foster parent work with a child with negative prior attachment experiences to help them develop secure and healthy attachments? (4 marks)

This question was kinda confusing. So here is it about what a child been through


Sorry
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ILoveKDramas
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What research do you think needs to be undertaken on attachment and parenting? What problems do you think could be encountered when trying to undertake research on this topic? (5 marks)

Provide four sources which you would direct readers to for further information about attachment theory and parenting. Ensure you reference each source correctly and provide a sentence on why and how you think each source is helpful to prospective reader. (4 marks)


Here are two other questions
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Davalla
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Is this Undergraduate material?
If so; 'madmax' is probably referencing A Level answers, so don't rely on them as they don't sound as if they will get you brilliant marks to be honest.

I'm unable to help, but surely Googling the questions would give you a better chance than listing them in bulk on here?
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ILoveKDramas
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(Original post by Davalla)
Is this Undergraduate material?
If so; 'madmax' is probably referencing A Level answers, so don't rely on them as they don't sound as if they will get you brilliant marks to be honest.

I'm unable to help, but surely Googling the questions would give you a better chance than listing them in bulk on here?
Lol yes they are undergraduate, and yes I did try googling them that's like the first place I went to for help. And he was kinda helpful actually made me understand some of the questions.

lol dude this was my last resort, heheheh I seriously needed help I mean its only those questions left and Ima done. My deadline is coming closer and closer.

Anywayz thanks for your help
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Vangelis_Greece
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A)because the baby via attachment will build an IWM (internal working memory) on which all his/her latel adult relatiuonships will be based.

B)sameroff's transactional model shows how parent/adult-baby relationship affect each other.

C)almost the same as A answer

D)ST (an experiment that involves several interactions among mother,her infant and a stranger in order to assess atachment) showed three types of attachment: secure, insecure avoidant and insecure ambivalent,all these types of relatioship it has to do between mother-infant interaction,Solomon found a fourth one known as insecure disorganised-all these types based on an internal working model that infant built via the interaction with her/his mother.

e)negative xperiences can be overcome with positive reinforcement

F)as for critique i cannot recall sorry
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