ChocInABox
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Hey something I'm confused about. If we are looking at how mitochondria came about there is a theory known as endosymbioti theory that tries to explain this. A eukaryotic ancestor cell which is anaerobic engulfed an aerobic bacteria. Uve read up on this bur what I dint understand is how the aerobic bacteria could live inside the anaerobic ancestor cell because the bacteria requires oxygen but wouldn't any oxygen be a poison to the anaerobic cell and kill it ?

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willp93
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(Original post by ChocInABox)
Hey something I'm confused about. If we are looking at how mitochondria came about there is a theory known as endosymbioti theory that tries to explain this. A eukaryotic ancestor cell which is anaerobic engulfed an aerobic bacteria. Uve read up on this bur what I dint understand is how the aerobic bacteria could live inside the anaerobic ancestor cell because the bacteria requires oxygen but wouldn't any oxygen be a poison to the anaerobic cell and kill it ?

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Just because the cell respired anaerobically doesn't mean oxygen would kill it...
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Hal.E.Lujah
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(Original post by ChocInABox)
Hey something I'm confused about. If we are looking at how mitochondria came about there is a theory known as endosymbioti theory that tries to explain this. A eukaryotic ancestor cell which is anaerobic engulfed an aerobic bacteria. Uve read up on this bur what I dint understand is how the aerobic bacteria could live inside the anaerobic ancestor cell because the bacteria requires oxygen but wouldn't any oxygen be a poison to the anaerobic cell and kill it ?

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Hi,

I believe that the eukaryote ancestor cell would have been helped by the presence of the mitochondria, because the mitochondria would have stopped the oxygen being toxic to the eukaryote, hence allowing the eukaryote to become an aerobic cell (by utilising the mitochondria for aerobic respiration).

This website might help you quite a bit, you should give it a read: http://www.nature.com/scitable/topic...ndria-14232356

Specifically, this part explains what you are asking:

This view is linked to the ideas that the mitochondrial endosymbiont was an obligateaerobe, perhaps similar in physiology and lifestyle to modern Rickettsiaspecies; and that the initial benefit of the symbiosis might have been the endosymbiont's ability to detoxify oxygen for the anaerobe host.


I hope this answers your question.

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Hal.E.Lujah
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(Original post by willp93)
Just because the cell respired anaerobically doesn't mean oxygen would kill it...

Oxygen is very reactive and therefore can be toxic to some anaerobic species. It can also interrupt the processes of some enzymes.
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willp93
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(Original post by Hal.E.Lujah)
Oxygen is very reactive and therefore can be toxic to some anaerobic species. It can also interrupt the processes of some enzymes.
thanks for that random bit of info, but its not really relevant. oxygen is not toxic to all anaerobic cells...
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