Energy released when splitting an atom?

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Taelii
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#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
I guess this is the right place to put my question I'm not studying physics but I'm just curious because atoms and stuff are really interesting.

How much energy is released when splitting an atom, how do they split atoms and how the scientists collect the energy produced?
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InsertWittyName
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#2
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Nuclear fusion in reactors is caused by firing neutrons into a nucleus with a high atomic mass (e.g. uranium)

In nuclear fusion, the sum of the split nuclear masses is less than the original mass of the nucleus before it was split (mass deficit). From the mass-energy equivalence E=mc^2, the 'lost' mass is sent out as high energy photons (gamma radiation).

This energy is usually used to heat water, creating steam which moves some sort of turbine (or something to that effect)
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kallijay
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Neutrons are fired at an unstable nucleus that has more neutrons than protons. The nucleus splits into two daughter nuclei and this releases energy. Also it sparks a chain reaction. Image
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Taelii
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#4
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
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(Original post by InsertWittyName)
Nuclear fusion in reactors is caused by firing neutrons into a nucleus with a high atomic mass (e.g. uranium)

In nuclear fusion, the sum of the split nuclear masses is less than the original mass of the nucleus before it was split (mass deficit). From the mass-energy equivalence E=mc^2, the 'lost' mass is sent out as high energy photons (gamma radiation).

This energy is usually used to heat water, creating steam which moves some sort of turbine (or something to that effect)
Thank you very much
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Stonebridge
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Report 6 years ago
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(Original post by InsertWittyName)
Nuclear fusion in reactors is caused by firing neutrons into a nucleus with a high atomic mass (e.g. uranium)

In nuclear fusion, the sum of the split nuclear masses is less than the original mass of the nucleus before it was split (mass deficit). From the mass-energy equivalence E=mc^2, the 'lost' mass is sent out as high energy photons (gamma radiation).

This energy is usually used to heat water, creating steam which moves some sort of turbine (or something to that effect)
I think you mean fission.
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InsertWittyName
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#6
Report 6 years ago
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(Original post by Stonebridge)
I think you mean fission.
Whoops- didn't notice I was typing fusion .

Bah. Words confuse me.

(Original post by Taelii)
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^Tis fisison m'lad.
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