My teacher refuses to raise my predicted grades?

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snikutsmullac
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In AS-Level Law I got a B; my UMS was exactly half-way between the B and A boundaries so it was a good, solid B. In one exam I got an A and in the other I got a C, 1 UMS off of a B. I am resitting the C exam and am certain I can get it up to an A, as I know exactly where I went wrong and how to improve.

I have been working my socks off since the beginning of A2 to do my best and try and get an A overall. However, my teacher refuses to predict me higher than a B. I have explained to her that I need an A for almost all of the universities I am looking at, she can see how hard I am working and she knows I am retaking the one exam but she is completely refusing to predict me an A. It is not fair because I am sure I will get an A, and it is likely going to prevent me from getting offers from every university I am looking at. I don't know what to do.

Any advice?
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Chlorophile
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(Original post by snikutsmullac)
In AS-Level Law I got a B; my UMS was exactly half-way between the B and A boundaries so it was a good, solid B. In one exam I got an A and in the other I got a C, 1 UMS off of a B. I am resitting the C exam and am certain I can get it up to an A, as I know exactly where I went wrong and how to improve.

I have been working my socks off since the beginning of A2 to do my best and try and get an A overall. However, my teacher refuses to predict me higher than a B. I have explained to her that I need an A for almost all of the universities I am looking at, she can see how hard I am working and she knows I am retaking the one exam but she is completely refusing to predict me an A. It is not fair because I am sure I will get an A, and it is likely going to prevent me from getting offers from every university I am looking at. I don't know what to do.

Any advice?
Sorry, but there's really nothing else you can do. You're not entitled to an 'A' prediction. Most people do worse at A2 than they did at AS. If you had a borderline A then I might sympathise a bit more but you didn't.

If it's any consolation, just because you're predicted something doesn't mean the universities will believe it. As I said, most people do not go up a grade at A2. So if lots of people are predicted to go up a grade, universities simply won't believe it. Your AS results are more important than your predicted grades.
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benq
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(Original post by snikutsmullac)
In AS-Level Law I got a B; my UMS was exactly half-way between the B and A boundaries so it was a good, solid B. In one exam I got an A and in the other I got a C, 1 UMS off of a B. I am resitting the C exam and am certain I can get it up to an A, as I know exactly where I went wrong and how to improve.

I have been working my socks off since the beginning of A2 to do my best and try and get an A overall. However, my teacher refuses to predict me higher than a B. I have explained to her that I need an A for almost all of the universities I am looking at, she can see how hard I am working and she knows I am retaking the one exam but she is completely refusing to predict me an A. It is not fair because I am sure I will get an A, and it is likely going to prevent me from getting offers from every university I am looking at. I don't know what to do.

Any advice?
The same thing happened to me last year. Go to the Head of House or the Principle. Maybe even ask your parents to talk with the teacher or the staff above. Teachers can refuse to predict you a grade, but there is no rule that they have to predict you X if you got Y. They are in power to predict you an A* even if you got a C. Good luck.
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snikutsmullac
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(Original post by Chlorophile)
Sorry, but there's really nothing else you can do. You're not entitled to an 'A' prediction. Most people do worse at A2 than they did at AS. If you had a borderline A then I might sympathise a bit more but you didn't.

If it's any consolation, just because you're predicted something doesn't mean the universities will believe it. As I said, most people do not go up a grade at A2. So if lots of people are predicted to go up a grade, universities simply won't believe it. Your AS results are more important than your predicted grades.
I'm sorry, but I am certain I am not going to do worse at A2 than at AS.
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Chlorophile
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(Original post by snikutsmullac)
I'm sorry, but I am certain I am not going to do worse at A2 than at AS.
That's wonderful. Unfortunately, universities aren't going to trust your judgement over that of your teachers.
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Le Nombre
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Your teacher can predict you what they like.

If she thinks you're going to get a B she's going to predict you a B. This is more so if you're applying for Law, as she'll have students applying every year and won't want to get a reputation amongst Law Facs as giving excessive predictions.
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Folion
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On the assumption that your teacher/school won't budge on your predicted I can only see that you have 2 options.

1) On your application put a couple of optimistic choices that ask for an A and put other choices down that ask for your predicted grades. Hopefully you'll get offers from the safer lower grade options and if lucky from an aspirational choice. If you do as well as you hope and get an A then you might be able to go through Adjustment to a course and uni that is nearer your aspirations.

or

2) Don't apply this year, blast your A levels then reapply next year with known grades and a gap year's worth of decent experience doing something.

As others have said it doesn't matter what you think it's what your school and unis think based on lots of students and previous experience.

Good luck though
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2007PSanHa
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I don't think they can predict more than 1 grade higher than your AS result (that's what we got told anyway)!
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RagaZ
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Risk it for a biscuit, apply to the universities that require a grade A,
and hopefully you will get offers. I've had some friends in the year above do this and get offers

if this dosnt work and you don't get offers then smash your Alevels and apply through clearing. Then photocopy your results sheet....take copy...roll it up....and shove it right up your teachers Ass
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Maker
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Its important teachers make realistic predictions. Otherwise, students would choose courses that are either above or below their likely grades and they would be disappointed.

Its too late for the OP now to change but it shows how important to work consistently hard rather than coast for a year and a half and expect to gain top marks at A2 and for your teachers to go along with it.
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Robocop656
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Yeah i'd agree with these people, risk it. Boss those exams and prove the teacher wrong; make sure you have a minimum of one place that are at your predicted grades though - You can then firm them and be eligible for adjustment if you do get what you think you deserve!
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snikutsmullac
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(Original post by Chlorophile)
That's wonderful. Unfortunately, universities aren't going to trust your judgement over that of your teachers.
Even teachers that have a reputation for consistently predicting students lower grades than they achieve

(Original post by Le Nombre)
Your teacher can predict you what they like.

If she thinks you're going to get a B she's going to predict you a B. This is more so if you're applying for Law, as she'll have students applying every year and won't want to get a reputation amongst Law Facs as giving excessive predictions.
You've hit the nail on the head, she's more worried about protecting herself from trouble than doing the best for us

(Original post by Folion)
On the assumption that your teacher/school won't budge on your predicted I can only see that you have 2 options.

1) On your application put a couple of optimistic choices that ask for an A and put other choices down that ask for your predicted grades. Hopefully you'll get offers from the safer lower grade options and if lucky from an aspirational choice. If you do as well as you hope and get an A then you might be able to go through Adjustment to a course and uni that is nearer your aspirations.

or

2) Don't apply this year, blast your A levels then reapply next year with known grades and a gap year's worth of decent experience doing something.

As others have said it doesn't matter what you think it's what your school and unis think based on lots of students and previous experience.

Good luck though
It's probably going to end up being adjustment, a lot of unnecessary hassle though

(Original post by 2007PSanHa)
I don't think they can predict more than 1 grade higher than your AS result (that's what we got told anyway)!
Not true, I got a C in AS history and my reasonable history teacher is predicting me an a for the same reasons as with law

(Original post by RagaZ)
Risk it for a biscuit, apply to the universities that require a grade A,
and hopefully you will get offers. I've had some friends in the year above do this and get offers

if this dosnt work and you don't get offers then smash your Alevels and apply through clearing. Then photocopy your results sheet....take copy...roll it up....and shove it right up your teachers Ass
It looks like I'll have to go down the adjustment route unless I'm fortunate enough to get offers.


(Original post by Maker)
Its important teachers make realistic predictions. Otherwise, students would choose courses that are either above or below their likely grades and they would be disappointed.

Its too late for the OP now to change but it shows how important to work consistently hard rather than coast for a year and a half and expect to gain top marks at A2 and for your teachers to go along with it.
I didn't coast last year, I worked hard last year but this year I'm working even harder and approaching my resit exams in a different way

I'm realistic, I know I'm not oxbridge material but I know what universities I can get into with the right predictions... Better than my teacher who every year predicts students lower than what they get just to make herself look good
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snikutsmullac
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I do appreciate your advice even if some of it is a bit harsh... Thanks guys
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TolerantBeing
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(Original post by Chlorophile)
Sorry, but there's really nothing else you can do. You're not entitled to an 'A' prediction. Most people do worse at A2 than they did at AS. If you had a borderline A then I might sympathise a bit more but you didn't.

If it's any consolation, just because you're predicted something doesn't mean the universities will believe it. As I said, most people do not go up a grade at A2. So if lots of people are predicted to go up a grade, universities simply won't believe it. Your AS results are more important than your predicted grades.

I don't think so, from my school everyone did better in A2. In AS you're still getting used to the new format of A-levels and most don't realise how much work they need to put in compared to their GCSEs.

Most teachers would put a grade higher in their predictions, and especially considering he had an A in an exam, I think it's harsh of her not to. OP, I'd suggest explaining the situation to your head of year.
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TolerantBeing
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(Original post by Chlorophile)
That's wonderful. Unfortunately, universities aren't going to trust your judgement over that of your teachers.
Was the 'that's wonderful' intentionally sarcky?
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snikutsmullac
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(Original post by TolerantBeing)
I don't think so, from my school everyone did better in A2. In AS you're still getting used to the new format of A-levels and most don't realise how much work they need to put in compared to their GCSEs.

Most teachers would put a grade higher in their predictions, and especially considering he had an A in an exam, I think it's harsh of her not to. OP, I'd suggest explaining the situation to your head of year.
My college doesn't do as well at AS but has the best A2 results in the region, so we do better at A2 as well.

The person who is head of A-Levels is just as stubborn
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by Robocop656)
Yeah i'd agree with these people, risk it. Boss those exams and prove the teacher wrong; make sure you have a minimum of one place that are at your predicted grades though - You can then firm them and be eligible for adjustment if you do get what you think you deserve!
I agree.
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TolerantBeing
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(Original post by snikutsmullac)
My college doesn't do as well at AS but has the best A2 results in the region, so we do better at A2 as well.

The person who is head of A-Levels is just as stubborn

My advice is this, do not settle. Don't settle for a lower uni than your ambitions just because you want to go this year. A gap year is definitely not a year wasted, but three years at a university you didn't want to go to in the first place is definitely a waste.


I think you should forget about predicted grades, don't give in to your teacher, smash through your A-levels, have a year out doing whatever you like and apply to unis without having the stress of predicted grades. To me it's simple
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snikutsmullac
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(Original post by TolerantBeing)
My advice is this, do not settle. Don't settle for a lower uni than your ambitions just because you want to go this year. A gap year is definitely not a year wasted, but three years at a university you didn't want to go to in the first place is definitely a waste.


I think you should forget about predicted grades, don't give in to your teacher, smash through your A-levels, have a year out doing whatever you like and apply to unis without having the stress of predicted grades. To me it's simple
I do get what you're saying but I don't want to take a gap year, what I'll probably do is firm a place with lower requirements and go through adjustment
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Observatory
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(Original post by snikutsmullac)
In AS-Level Law I got a B; my UMS was exactly half-way between the B and A boundaries so it was a good, solid B. In one exam I got an A and in the other I got a C, 1 UMS off of a B. I am resitting the C exam and am certain I can get it up to an A, as I know exactly where I went wrong and how to improve.

I have been working my socks off since the beginning of A2 to do my best and try and get an A overall. However, my teacher refuses to predict me higher than a B.
The information that exists doesn't justify predicting you an A. You did not get an A at the (easier) AS level and it does not sound like your marks are particularly close to an A either. The grade she predicted is in line with your past performance. I would understand if she had predicted a C.
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