Why are under 25''s not given much option?

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bahonsi
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#1
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#1
I feel this government is failing under 25's and still treating us as kids. What are your thoughts?
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Tiger Rag
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#2
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#2
In what ways?
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bahonsi
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#3
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#3
(Original post by OU Student)
In what ways?
My cousin has just finished university, and was lucky to get a job, however the salary she gets isn't even enough to pay her rent and other bills without her struggling and seeking loans, she then tried to see what help she had and was told she isn't entitled to anything other than JSA as she is under 25, but having worked and paid tax since the age of 16 isn't able to claim anything. On the other hand people who haven't worked a day in their life just because they are over 25 are able to claim whatever benefit or help the require. I just think it's unfair, never really given it much thought but I just feel were being screwed over, we are old enough to pay taxes but not old enough to benefit from does taxes.
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Tiger Rag
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#4
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#4
(Original post by bahonsi)
My cousin has just finished university, and was lucky to get a job, however the salary she gets isn't even enough to pay her rent and other bills without her struggling and seeking loans, she then tried to see what help she had and was told she isn't entitled to anything other than JSA as she is under 25, but having worked and paid tax since the age of 16 isn't able to claim anything. On the other hand people who haven't worked a day in their life just because they are over 25 are able to claim whatever benefit or help the require. I just think it's unfair, never really given it much thought but I just feel were being screwed over, we are old enough to pay taxes but not old enough to benefit from does taxes.
I am one of those people who has never really worked. I receive a lot less than someone who would be working.

Does she really want to swap places with someone who is unable to contribute to society and is forced to live on benefits and have to constantly prove that they have a severe disability?
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Clip
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#5
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#5
(Original post by bahonsi)
My cousin has just finished university, and was lucky to get a job, however the salary she gets isn't even enough to pay her rent and other bills without her struggling and seeking loans, she then tried to see what help she had and was told she isn't entitled to anything other than JSA as she is under 25, but having worked and paid tax since the age of 16 isn't able to claim anything. On the other hand people who haven't worked a day in their life just because they are over 25 are able to claim whatever benefit or help the require. I just think it's unfair, never really given it much thought but I just feel were being screwed over, we are old enough to pay taxes but not old enough to benefit from does taxes.
It might seem a bit unfair, but the rationale is to prevent people from getting into the cycle of non-work. For generations, there have been young people going straight from school to the dole with no intention of ever working. Each and every one of these people is an enormous drain on the state.

Clearly, your cousin isn't one of these, but there's no effective way of differentiating - and you have to start somewhere.
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tengentoppa
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#6
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#6
Most young people are politically apathetic and not many young people vote. Why then, would a party bother reaching out to young people?
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bahonsi
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#7
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#7
(Original post by tengentoppa)
Most young people are politically apathetic and not many young people vote. Why then, would a party bother reaching out to young people?
If more young people were involved politically we would vote more often, the political part seem to just alienate the younger generation, but once were given the chance to participate am sure majority will take that chance.
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donutaud15
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#8
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#8
OP you're right and it sucks.

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bahonsi
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#9
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#9
(Original post by OU Student)
I am one of those people who has never really worked. I receive a lot less than someone who would be working.

Does she really want to swap places with someone who is unable to contribute to society and is forced to live on benefits and have to constantly prove that they have a severe disability?
There's a difference with people not being able to work and those who are able to work and chose not too. I just feel she's spent all that time in education and is now struggling where as my friend who didn't even get to sixth form with a child now has a flat being paid for by the government and lives in bliss while getting £300 weekly, not including her rent and bills which are all paid for.
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bahonsi
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Clip)
It might seem a bit unfair, but the rationale is to prevent people from getting into the cycle of non-work. For generations, there have been young people going straight from school to the dole with no intention of ever working. Each and every one of these people is an enormous drain on the state.

Clearly, your cousin isn't one of these, but there's no effective way of differentiating - and you have to start somewhere.
A system should be put in place for the under 25 working, they should get help like housing benefit to at least help them. Majority of under 25's will never own a home and have to put up with extortionate rental rates and with no help from the government even though they seem to think introducing buy to help or other schemes will help get us on the ladder, when we can't even save up for a deposit with the rental cost weighing on our heads.
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Tiger Rag
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#11
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#11
(Original post by bahonsi)
There's a difference with people not being able to work and those who are able to work and chose not too. I just feel she's spent all that time in education and is now struggling where as my friend who didn't even get to sixth form with a child now has a flat being paid for by the government and lives in bliss while getting £300 weekly, not including her rent and bills which are all paid for.
would you rather your friend and her child starved and were on the streets?

As far as the Government are concerned, your other friend has enough money to live on.
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bahonsi
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#12
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#12
(Original post by OU Student)
would you rather your friend and her child starved and were on the streets?

As far as the Government are concerned, your other friend has enough money to live on.
Not really, but why are they being rewarded for taking the easier route? I decide to keep my head down finish my education and hopefully get a good job but I don't get the government giving me £300 a week not even in student finance.

But that's not the case, my cousin earns a fairly decent wage for a new graduate but that barely covers her rent in London let alone her bills.
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Clip
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#13
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#13
(Original post by bahonsi)
A system should be put in place for the under 25 working, they should get help like housing benefit to at least help them. Majority of under 25's will never own a home and have to put up with extortionate rental rates and with no help from the government even though they seem to think introducing buy to help or other schemes will help get us on the ladder, when we can't even save up for a deposit with the rental cost weighing on our heads.
The problem here is that you have been sold the "House buying = Holy Grail" thing, probably by older people.

Nothing wrong with renting, especially when you're young. Why try and buy a dump when you can rent somewhere cool and exciting?
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rsdntbplr
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#14
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#14
(Original post by bahonsi)
If more young people were involved politically we would vote more often, the political part seem to just alienate the younger generation, but once were given the chance to participate am sure majority will take that chance.
I'm not saying it's right but I'm afraid it works the other way around. Political parties chose policies that will when them more voters. As the majority of voters tend to come from the older age groups, policies benefitting those groups are prioritised to win them more voters.

As for the claim that under 25's can't claim anything, it is partially incorrect. If you are 16-25 and have a child or are disabled you can get Working Tax Credit. Then there's housing benefit and income allowances should you be on a low income (along with free and/or discounted prescriptions and dental treatment). Housing benefit is of course only available under 35 if you're in shared accommodation or a bedsit but if she's in a bad financial situation, she needs to cut costs anyway. And if you're taken badly ill, Employment and Support Allowance and other disability related benefits.

Benefits and financial support services are there for those on low incomes, with disabilities and others that need it. They are not a right and none of us are entitled to them just because we work, or breathe, or live. We are lucky to have such a large welfare budget because a lot of countries do not provide any support no matter your situation.

If your cousin is living in her own home and having to pay rent, she should be entitled to housing benefit unless she is earning above the threshold. And if her salary is low she probably hasn't actually paid much if any tax at all.

The national debt is over £1trillion. The government can't just give handouts to anybody that demands them. If she was in a dire situation she'd get financial help.
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bahonsi
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#15
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#15
(Original post by Clip)
The problem here is that you have been sold the "House buying = Holy Grail" thing, probably by older people.

Nothing wrong with renting, especially when you're young. Why try and buy a dump when you can rent somewhere cool and exciting?
Personally I would prefer renting being American our new American Dream is renting. But having spent 9 years in the uk everyone seems to think owing your own home is a status of wealth and that's what the harsh reality is. I would much rather the government scrapped the help get on the housing laser scheme and use that to help fund affordable renting. I personally don't see myself owing my own home in the uk with the depreciating value with will be a costly mistake.
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scrotgrot
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#16
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#16
(Original post by Clip)
The problem here is that you have been sold the "House buying = Holy Grail" thing, probably by older people.

Nothing wrong with renting, especially when you're young. Why try and buy a dump when you can rent somewhere cool and exciting?
If renting wasn't so expensive (especially in the "cool and exciting" places) it would be fine. But giving half your wage to some landlord so he can make a monthly profit on top of the asset you're buying him is obscene and limits our freedom. The less disposable income you have, the more of a slave you are, that's the bottom line.

It's not about being sold anything. Given the choice between overpaying in perpetuity with nothing to show for it, having to work to pay rent till you drop dead, and overpaying for a few decades and coming out with an asset to retire on - particularly as there will be no pensions for our generation - anyone would want to buy.
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Clip
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#17
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#17
(Original post by scrotgrot)
If renting wasn't so expensive (especially in the "cool and exciting" places) it would be fine. But giving half your wage to some landlord so he can make a monthly profit on top of the asset you're buying him is obscene and limits our freedom. The less disposable income you have, the more of a slave you are, that's the bottom line.
Of course. Because mortgage interest isn't exactly the same thing.
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bahonsi
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#18
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#18
(Original post by rsdntbplr)
I'm not saying it's right but I'm afraid it works the other way around. Political parties chose policies that will when them more voters. As the majority of voters tend to come from the older age groups, policies benefitting those groups are prioritised to win them more voters.

As for the claim that under 25's can't claim anything, it is partially incorrect. If you are 16-25 and have a child or are disabled you can get Working Tax Credit. Then there's housing benefit and income allowances should you be on a low income (along with free and/or discounted prescriptions and dental treatment). Housing benefit is of course only available under 35 if you're in shared accommodation or a bedsit but if she's in a bad financial situation, she needs to cut costs anyway. And if you're taken badly ill, Employment and Support Allowance and other disability related benefits.

Benefits and financial support services are there for those on low incomes, with disabilities and others that need it. They are not a right and none of us are entitled to them just because we work, or breathe, or live. We are lucky to have such a large welfare budget because a lot of countries do not provide any support no matter your situation.

If your cousin is living in her own home and having to pay rent, she should be entitled to housing benefit unless she is earning above the threshold. And if her salary is low she probably hasn't actually paid much if any tax at all.

The national debt is over £1trillion. The government can't just give handouts to anybody that demands them. If she was in a dire situation she'd get financial help.
Exactly what I pointed out, under 25's and have a kid are in a better position than does who don't. She earns £21k and pays rent of £900pcm for a small studio. She tried claiming Housing benefit and was told she wasn't entitled to anything as she was under 25, and even at that she will only be entitled to £90 a week when she turns 26 (shared accommodation) providing her salary doesn't increase. She can't claim working tax credit, can't claim pretty much anything. Free prescription? I had to pay £40 the other week for my proscription. Maybe am just misinformed about what's available. Am not saying handouts should be readily available rather the right help should be given to the right people.
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scrotgrot
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#19
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#19
(Original post by Clip)
Of course. Because mortgage interest isn't exactly the same thing.
Uhhh see above, at least you get something out of it at the end, and you might have a chance of retiring
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rsdntbplr
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#20
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#20
(Original post by bahonsi)
Exactly what I pointed out, under 25's and have a kid are in a better position than does who don't. She earns £21k and pays rent of £900pcm for a small studio. She tried claiming Housing benefit and was told she wasn't entitled to anything as she was under 25, and even at that she will only be entitled to £90 a week when she turns 26 (shared accommodation) providing her salary doesn't increase. She can't claim working tax credit, can't claim pretty much anything. Free prescription? I had to pay £40 the other week for my proscription. Maybe am just misinformed about what's available. Am not saying handouts should be readily available rather the right help should be given to the right people.
21K?!! How the hell do you think the government should pay benefits to someone earning 21K? My mother is 56, she's been working all her life, and she's never earned more than 21K per year. That's HUGE to still be expecting benefits and whatnot. Especially at her age. I'm 20 and I'm stuck on about 8K a year. Your cousin should try living on that without any support!

And free/discounted prescriptions are for those on low incomes - definitely nowhere near 21K!
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