Will my brain get full? Learning too much!

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Da Di Doo
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This may be the dumbest question I have ever asked, but I am studying so much. I am learning EVERYTHING in my textbook - stuff that is not mentioned in the specification because I'm paranoid that it might still come up.

Right now it's not hard at all. Everything is going into my brain, I'm understanding everything, the workload is perfect but I'm just worried if my brain will get too full of information. Is that even possible?
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Da Di Doo
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(Original post by williamstranix)
You are a woman and so have a very limited brain capacity.
Who broke your heart?
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SuperiorGenius
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(Original post by williamstranix)
You are a woman and so have a very limited brain capacity.
:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
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askew116
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(Original post by Da Di Doo)
This may be the dumbest question I have ever asked, but I am studying so much. I am learning EVERYTHING in my textbook - stuff that is not mentioned in the specification because I'm paranoid that it might still come up.

Right now it's not hard at all. Everything is going into my brain, I'm understanding everything, the workload is perfect but I'm just worried if my brain will get too full of information. Is that even possible?
To inject some seriousness into this thread, our brains are not like a hard drive, with a specific capacity. We learn new information by making connections between synapses. The good news is that everyone has billions of synapses, and so the number of possible connections is practically infinite.

However, your capacity for learning will be affected by more mundane things, such as your mood, energy levels, hydration and the amount of time you've been studying etc. That's why standard advice is to keep eat healthily (oily fish is supposed to be good for your brain!), drink plenty of water, and take short but regular breaks.

Edit: It would make a novel excuse for not learning something/not doing homework..."But Miss, my brain was full!"
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Ggmu!
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(Original post by williamstranix)
You are a woman and so have a very limited brain capacity.
:awesome:

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cole-slaw
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(Original post by Da Di Doo)
This may be the dumbest question I have ever asked, but I am studying so much. I am learning EVERYTHING in my textbook - stuff that is not mentioned in the specification because I'm paranoid that it might still come up.

Right now it's not hard at all. Everything is going into my brain, I'm understanding everything, the workload is perfect but I'm just worried if my brain will get too full of information. Is that even possible?
This is both a long term and short term question.

In the short term its impossible to process more than a handful of ideas at once. For every hour you spend studying, you probably need an hour off to let you brain process the information. Good sleep is really important to a good memory, so your brain can file away the stuff you learnt the previous day. This is why staying up late to revise before an exam is a terrible idea. Not only will you not learn anything new, but your reduced sleep will mean that the next day you will have forgotten almost everything you have studied.

This is really important to remember come exam period!


In the long term, there is only so much information you can store in your brain, but it turns out to be a hell of a lot. If you don't use a piece of memory for a long time, it gets lost and eventually overwritten. So make sure you use, or at least think about, the really important stuff like the content of your degree to stop yourself forgetting it.

On the other hand, the less you think about useless information like who won the x-factor, the better, then you can free that space in your memory.
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FreshGarbage
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Short term memory, holds 7+/-2 units of information at one time. Long term memory is pretty much unlimited. Obviously its more complicated than that but there is the general gist.

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Da Di Doo
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I thumbed up all the serious answers as a thank you.
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williamstranix
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(Original post by FreshGarbage)
Short term memory, holds 7+/-2 units of information at one time. Long term memory is pretty much unlimited. Obviously its more complicated than that but there is the general gist.

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Your name really suits you! Although you should probably alter "Fresh" to "Stale"!
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FreshGarbage
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(Original post by williamstranix)
Your name really suits you! Although you should probably alter "Fresh" to "Stale"!
That is so kind :L
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username931319
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It's dyspeptic that the pedigree of what's considered "too much" is learning from a textbook, and non-specific information apropos to the subject.
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Da Di Doo
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(Original post by AntisthenesDogger)
It's dyspeptic that the pedigree of what's considered "too much" is learning from a textbook, and non-specific information apropos to the subject.

(Original post by FreshGarbage)
Short term memory, holds 7+/-2 units of information at one time. Long term memory is pretty much unlimited. Obviously its more complicated than that but there is the general gist.

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(Original post by cole-slaw)
This is both a long term and short term question.

In the short term its impossible to process more than a handful of ideas at once. For every hour you spend studying, you probably need an hour off to let you brain process the information. Good sleep is really important to a good memory, so your brain can file away the stuff you learnt the previous day. This is why staying up late to revise before an exam is a terrible idea. Not only will you not learn anything new, but your reduced sleep will mean that the next day you will have forgotten almost everything you have studied.

This is really important to remember come exam period!


In the long term, there is only so much information you can store in your brain, but it turns out to be a hell of a lot. If you don't use a piece of memory for a long time, it gets lost and eventually overwritten. So make sure you use, or at least think about, the really important stuff like the content of your degree to stop yourself forgetting it.

On the other hand, the less you think about useless information like who won the x-factor, the better, then you can free that space in your memory.

(Original post by askew116)
To inject some seriousness into this thread, our brains are not like a hard drive, with a specific capacity. We learn new information by making connections between synapses. The good news is that everyone has billions of synapses, and so the number of possible connections is practically infinite.

However, your capacity for learning will be affected by more mundane things, such as your mood, energy levels, hydration and the amount of time you've been studying etc. That's why standard advice is to keep eat healthily (oily fish is supposed to be good for your brain!), drink plenty of water, and take short but regular breaks.
I'm studying for 16 exams if that makes a difference so 11 textbooks (4 subjects, AS and A2).
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askew116
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(Original post by Da Di Doo)
I'm studying for 16 exams if that makes a difference so 11 textbooks (4 subjects, AS and A2).
No it makes no difference. Just wait until you get to degree level, though!
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